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Lola T-70 Mk III

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179 replies
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  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, January 23, 2020 9:46 AM
I machined tool to make controlling the parting line in the wheel molds easier. 
It locks into the back of the wheel center like the rear piece of the rims.
Clay is used to seal one side.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, January 26, 2020 2:00 PM
Then I cast the side that contains the face of the wheel in RTV so that the seams are all on the inside of the wheel and quite minimal at that.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: CA Gold Country foothills.
Posted by mishalah on Saturday, February 1, 2020 7:40 AM
Those valve covers are outstanding!

"Help me....I've fallen and I can't get up."...my models are crushing me. my pics: https://public.fotki.com/dallas916/

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, February 1, 2020 7:17 PM

Thanks!

 

The half-shafts are done for now.  The yokes are cast resin (dyed black) copies of 3D parts.
The shafts are brass acid treated for the dark finish. 
Each U-joint has four bearings/caps (with E clips) and they work.  The half-shafts telescope too.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    January 2020
  • From: Florida USA
Posted by Gooch01 on Saturday, February 1, 2020 8:36 PM

Excellent work your cad work is spot on next-level stuff.  

Regards 

Dave 

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, February 5, 2020 6:07 PM

Thanks Dave!

 

I was going to have to adjust the rotor hubs (or make shims) so I decided to mill a new one out of resin stock instead of editing the 3D file and growing a replacement.  This was quicker too.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    January 2015
Posted by mustang1989 on Thursday, February 6, 2020 7:59 AM

Always good to pop in on this one and see the work going on. Lookin' good so far.

Being really stupid is the new smart!! 

    Joe

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, March 8, 2020 4:21 PM
I designed and then grew the rotors several times over the course of a few months.  The detail I want is just not something my printer can do on both sides.  (One side is great.)  I redesigned them adding more material so I could post-machine  after growing them, but the material is too brittle when cured, and too soft and pliable before fully curing.  I was able to make them look really good after machining, but every one of them had micro fractures (or worse) that would show up under paint.
The good side of them:
The rough side of them before machining:

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, March 8, 2020 4:52 PM
So after way too much time and effort without acceptable results, I went back to my original plan to make the rotors before I got the 3D printer…  Good old machining.
First I milled in the rectangular vent holes around the perimeter.
Then I cross-drilled 60 holes in each side.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, March 9, 2020 3:55 PM
As satisfied I was at the time, the more I looked the more I thought I could do better…  So more time on the mill and now I think I have what I want.  These cross-drilled holes scale out to ¼ inch in diameter.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, April 16, 2020 1:42 PM
I decided to go with my earlier rotor configuration; slotted and cross-drilled.
Raw rotor blanks cut from high-pressure cast blank aluminum composite material.
I milled the vents around the perimeter and faced them.
I cross-drilled and slotted them.  They are directional.
This is the natural cut finish of the material.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, May 6, 2020 10:08 AM
One year "birthday" for this project.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, May 13, 2020 8:58 PM
I got the Wilwood calipers painted, going for a ceramic finish look.  They are Corvette retrofit units I designed in SolidWorks and 3D printed before hand-finishing the masters then casting resin copies.  I used the new Tamiya LP-6 Pure Blue for the color.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, May 14, 2020 10:21 AM
The new 3D printed caliper brackets I designed and grew to mount the calipers have been attached to the front spindles.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    December 2010
  • From: Hillsboro, TX
Posted by ibj40 on Thursday, May 14, 2020 2:19 PM

Just popped in as this came up in a new posts search.

You are amazing, with your skills and imagination.

I am in awe!

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, May 14, 2020 9:43 PM

Thank you ibj40, that is very kind of you to say!

 

I carefully saved the rear caliper mounts on the hub carriers when I cut off the molded on calipers from the kit.  But those had to go too because the larger Wilwood calipers couldn't be mounted to them.  Again, these are 3D parts I rendered in SolidWorks and printed.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, May 15, 2020 1:51 PM
Composite brake pads.  They have been seated and used just a little bit…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, May 15, 2020 9:04 PM
The pads are installed and the calipers have been dry set up on their respective bracketry.
The rotors, hubs, calipers and pads are all scratch-built. The slide pins are polished steel, but still more hardware to machine for the calipers.
Rears:
Fronts:

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, May 17, 2020 8:03 PM
I had to make the coil over shocks next to continue mocking up the suspension.
Shock bodies…


 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, May 18, 2020 5:32 PM
Spring tension adjusters/lock rings.  The taller ones fit inside the springs.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, May 18, 2020 7:11 PM
Tops of the shocks with the piston shafts.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, May 18, 2020 9:01 PM
All press-fitted machined aluminum with the kit provided springs (also friction fit).
I'll paint the springs later.  At least now I can continue engineering and building other pieces of the car…
Yes, there are rubber bushings for the eyelets and of course they work.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, May 19, 2020 2:12 PM
Front shocks installed…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, May 19, 2020 3:53 PM
Rear shocks installed…
I also turned an aluminum pulley to drive the alternator and it's mounted to the half-shaft.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, May 19, 2020 4:50 PM
Finally, and for the first time it is up on its wheels so I can get an idea of where the ride height is.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, May 20, 2020 10:36 PM
Back to working on the alternator; because it has become relevant to the suspension.
More fabrication…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, May 23, 2020 2:39 PM
Alternator bracket.  I designed it in SolidWorks and grew it.
Alternator drive pulley.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, May 23, 2020 6:09 PM
Assembled alternator bolted to the bracket.  I machined the hardware.
(The fan spins too.)  Still some detail painting to do…
 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, May 23, 2020 6:21 PM
I had to make an offset pulley for the alternator to clear the transmission mounts.  The ratio comes out to the alternator turning about 3000 RPM at 100MPH.
Alternator assembly loosely fitted to the car.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, May 31, 2020 1:41 PM
I drew up the base of the intake manifold and did a test print.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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