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Lola T-70 Mk III

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  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, July 16, 2019 6:12 PM
I cleaned up and assembled the other wheels Fraxional "grew" from my files.  But I decided to try some other colors for the heck of it.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, July 19, 2019 8:08 PM
The tires were one of the parts I intended to use at the start.  I was a little concerned however when they turned out to be Bridgestones instead of Firestones as shown on the box art. 
What became a larger concern was that they were a little wonky in shape (probably from long-term storage) and there were flaps of rubber material on some of the sidewalls. 
I put the rims in them to hopefully retrain their shape and that worked well over the course of a few weeks of resting.
But when I started to sand the tread to give a scuffed look and remove the mold lines, light colored specks started to show through.  They were embedded in the material.  Removal would leave a divot or scar, so I applied some dye I use for resin casting and it hid the spots well. 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, July 20, 2019 1:07 PM
The door windows needed to be fitted now that the exterior of the doors were getting close to being fixed.  A good amount of reshaping the openings including the corners was done.  Since I didn't do anything to the openings until this point I was a little surprised at both how off one side was and how close the other was. 
I tried not to rework the clear parts, but some extending was required on the bottom edges of both main sections and shaping on other sides.  There were also a couple hairline fractures in those parts that had to be repaired too.
 
After I got the windows to fit I seamed the edges with 1000 grit sandpaper then started smoothing the faces with 1200.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, July 20, 2019 5:39 PM
All polished out…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    February, 2008
Posted by justmike on Monday, July 22, 2019 11:58 AM

Which begs the question; Whats the secret to extending a clear part!?!?  If you have to kill me after telling me though, maybe I don't wanna know.Big Smile

Feelings are like scents: The more they are analyzed, the worse they smell.
  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, July 23, 2019 9:56 AM

No secret Mike, just build it up with CA.

 

I wanted to get the hinge mechanism made for the rear hatch since it's the last part of fitting up the body that needed to be done.

 
I had to start by reworking the rear bulkhead.
The rear tray has half of the hinges molded to it.  I cut them off and installed a stainless steel tube.

 

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, July 23, 2019 9:42 PM
The two little plastic parts of the hinges that mount to the engine cover didn't look like they would stand up to too much action, at least at the joint where they would be cemented.   Plus I could see they are supposed to be added after painting the exterior, further creating fit continuity issues.  The gray pieces are the modified and beefed up kit parts; the rest is scratch-built from sheet styrene.  The plan is to make the hinge system stand-alone from the body shell.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, July 25, 2019 12:40 PM
Final new part with 1/16 inch steel rod laminated in to it for strength.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, July 25, 2019 6:54 PM
The outer hinges are made of brass and styrene.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, July 25, 2019 8:16 PM
More magnets…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, July 26, 2019 4:03 PM
I started reworking the two rear supports that connect the tray to the rear bulkhead so I can continue working on the hinging of the engine cover.  I removed the posts that supported the battery box (used to be a motorized kit) and drilled out the flanges for the spare tire guides.  Since they also have suspension mounting points that will need to accept closed ended fittings I had to engineer them to facilitate those parts (that will be made later).  The first machined aluminum pieces for this project…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, July 28, 2019 8:01 PM
Brass tubing was used to make the hinges for the engine cover.  More magnets were also utilized.
 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, August 13, 2019 2:21 PM
The gas struts for the doors.
Upper hinges, acid cut brass.
The strut bodies are brass, the shafts are stainless steel.
The lower hinges are machined aluminum.
Closed.  They compress well.
Open.  They slide smoothly and provide just enough friction to keep the door open.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    March, 2019
  • From: Quitman, Texas
Posted by LostInStyreneAnd... on Tuesday, August 13, 2019 3:33 PM

Just Incredible work!!!!   It's been a looooooooooooooong time since I've seen one up close, but I have a feeling your finished product will look better than what Lola built back in the day.   

Eric Automobile

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: cleveland,ohio
Posted by cameraboy5 on Friday, August 16, 2019 11:32 AM
WOW! Just came across this thread Amazing work and love all of your remedies for ill fighting parts. Where are you getting the magnets from? Size?
"If its not surrounded by a corn field..... its not a real race track!!
  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, August 30, 2019 1:45 PM

Thanks guys!

I found the magnets online, ordered from three different sources.  I'm using 1/8 x 1/16 and 3mm x 1mm.

 

The last part of fitting the door skins to the openings was to add the gaps at the bottoms of the doors.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, September 01, 2019 5:54 PM
The little winglets are shown on the box art but are not included in the kit.  Not a big deal for this project, but I wanted some on it nonetheless.  I hand cut a pair from sheet brass and slotted the nose to accept them.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, September 03, 2019 10:05 AM
Then I cut and annealed a couple strips of brass, shaped them to the fender and curvature of the winglets and soldered them in place for the mounting flanges.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, September 05, 2019 11:37 AM
I started adding the rear spoiler fairings.  Sheet styrene instead of brass, but installed in slots like the front winglets.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, September 05, 2019 9:31 PM
I added the top edge of the rear spoiler(s) by sawing a notch into the existing peak to accept some strip styrene and fairing it in.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, September 06, 2019 2:25 PM
Looks much better in primer…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, September 07, 2019 2:01 PM
The kit engine is a SB Chevy, but it doesn't quite look right on its own and it builds up differently than a "normal" American kit.   (Probably due to it being designed to house an electric motor.)  Plus the heads were molded to the block halves and the rear of the block is a separate piece creating interesting seams.
I borrowed the engine parts from the Monogram '69 Z/28 Camaro kit and made molds then cast resin copies. 
I cut off the oil filter, bellhousing & engine mounts from the oil pan, and the transmission & bellhousing from the block halves as well as the fuel pump from the front of the block.  The timing tab was also removed from the timing cover and the bolts were cut off and holes drilled in their place.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, September 07, 2019 10:05 PM
The rear of the block didn't look bad when it had a bellhousing molded to it, (and was going to be hidden by a firewall), but it turns out it is not at all symmetrical.  Since the rear of this engine will be very exposed when in the car I had to rework it.  I added 0.020 sheet styrene and reworked it.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, September 08, 2019 12:01 PM
I drew the valve covers (copied from my real car) in SolidWorks.  I'll have Fraxional "grow" them.
 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, September 09, 2019 10:26 AM
I also made the bellhousing in SolidWorks since the kit item wasn't a fit or match for the new engine.  Again Fraxional is my go-to 3D printer.  This is will be a stand-in for mocking up the engine mounts and rear suspension and might get modified later.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, September 10, 2019 3:43 PM
The bolt-on rear spoiler is made of brass.  I hand cut two identical pieces from 0.010 sheet.  Then drilled 19 holes in each and scored one side of both for the upper "tabs".
The upper "tabs" were bent using an angle template for continuity.
Then I soldered them together.  This is the rear side.
I acid cut a recess that will accept a clear spoiler element/window. This is the front side.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, September 10, 2019 8:37 PM
 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, September 12, 2019 11:50 AM
I started building the transaxle so it might be ready when I get the bellhousing from Fraxional, (the 3D printing service I've been using). 
First up was to cut off and drill out all the bolts, studs, drain plugs… and fill some sink marks.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, September 13, 2019 10:04 PM
I drew up a new Hewland transaxle rear cover because there was a sink mark where some of the lettering was.
Since the kit part had HEWLANG molded in with that sink mark, it only made sense to fix both issues this way.
I planned ahead for the mounting of the part too.

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, September 14, 2019 3:46 PM
The resin heads I cast have been reworked by removing all the molded on "bolts" and drilling out for the aluminum replacements I'll machine.  The spark plug holes have been relocated to their proper locations too.  The exhaust ports have been hogged out and the holes for the accessory mounting brackets added.
(The white head is the stock Camaro one.)

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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