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Lola T-70 Mk III

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  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Lola T-70 Mk III
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, June 02, 2019 11:38 AM
I pulled this kit from my stash on May 5, 2019; the night we got home from the GSL show. 
1997 reissue of the 1970 Tamiya kit.  It's been patiently waiting for 22 years in my stash to be built.
I've been researching, planning and figuring all month.  (Actually I was scheming a couple days before in case I didn't find a dream deal on another Caterham kit during the show/trip.)
It will be built as a street car T-70 replica with some modern upgrades. 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, June 02, 2019 11:43 AM
I started by cleaning up the tub and main body panels. 
Lots of filling and sanding to remove the twenty ¼ inch diameter ejection pin marks in the tub alone and general parting lines.  But still a nicely molded kit considering its age.
The insides of the body also needed to be addressed for the same issues.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    November, 2004
  • From: UK
Posted by PatrickW on Sunday, June 02, 2019 3:52 PM

I'm looking forward to this build. I saw these when they were prototypes being tested at the Silverstone circuit where I was as a marshall at the time, and later as race cars! They were the loudest thing I had heard as they circulated!

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, June 02, 2019 4:46 PM
Converting the steering rack over to left-hand drive.  Part of the framework had to be cut and other areas filled for the track of the rack to slide and everything to be "flipped".  Then a new gear for the rack had to be created since the teeth were backwards.  The ejection pin holes were filled and new mounting holes for the pedal set were drilled too.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, June 03, 2019 10:32 AM
The top of the dash also needed to be converted to LHD.  I cut the pod out and a matching area on the left and swapped and blended them back together.  A little white styrene was used as filler on the new passenger side.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, June 03, 2019 4:38 PM
The front bulkhead was converted to LHD and all the holes were drilled out.  The inside was milled to be a constant thickness too.
Before:
After:

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, June 04, 2019 9:42 AM
The cowl also had to be modified for LHD.
Before:
In Progress:
Styrene was used as filler in some places; in other places the kit plastic was cut and reused.
The rivets were cut off and drilled out.
Since this car will only have one master cylinder the reservoirs for the dual set were shaved off.
The underside had to be modified as well so the steering would work properly and everything would fit.
Aluminum rivets…  Hand cut, filed and installed (some of them).
After:

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Roswell, GA USA
Posted by Ergo Proxy on Wednesday, June 05, 2019 2:26 PM

I have one of thos kits at home that I've had since the mid 80's. Still haven't built it yet. And I also have the Porsche 935 unbuilt and I bought the Scale Motorsports superkit for that one back in 2005.

Too many models to build in a lifetime.

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, June 05, 2019 3:16 PM

I've built both of the Porsche's, this one is an earlier release and it shows, but still looks to be a good kit.

 

Fitting the body panels.  I started with the side pods.  They have molded-in rivet detail along the top edges.  Those were removed and drilled out to accept small screws. 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: sunny Sydney, Australia
Posted by nottheband on Wednesday, June 05, 2019 6:10 PM

G'day Mark.  Impressive start.  I followed your Lotus build and was amazed all the way, I expect this beautiful T70 build will be more of the same, and I'm in.  1/12 is a big scale, how long is the body, about 12" 300mm or so?  Cheers

Steve

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, June 05, 2019 6:25 PM

Yep Steve, right about 12 inches long nose to tail.  And thanks!

 

The windshield frame/cowl section of the body did not fit very well on its own or locate positively.  Brass reinforcing plates were fabricated to make aligning it easier.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, June 06, 2019 11:50 AM
.040 sheet styrene was added to make the thread blocks on the underside of the tub for the small screws that will hold it together.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, June 07, 2019 12:42 PM
The side pods are mounted to the tub and the brass reinforcements are in place.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, June 08, 2019 11:23 AM
The windshield frame/cowl has been mated to the tub and side pods.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, June 10, 2019 10:19 AM
First test fitting of the front clip.  Fits pretty well out of the box after the seams were cleaned up.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    January, 2008
  • From: Plano (Dallas), Texas
Posted by mmthrax on Monday, June 10, 2019 4:49 PM

Just found this.  Always inspired by your work.

I'm on board sir.  Me and my notebook.  Big Smile

This will be another excellent build I'm sure. Yes

 

Just keep picking away at it...

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, June 10, 2019 8:59 PM

Thanks for the kind words.  Please do "ride along".  I never buit one of these before so it's a new ride for me...

 

The rear bulkhead.  It doesn't fit very well or positively so it needs to be fastened to the tub in a similar fashion as the cowl was.  It also needs to be installed so the doors will fit too.
 
A flange was added to the bottom of the bulkhead and reinforced with a dozen buttresses.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, June 11, 2019 11:12 AM
Two more brass flanges were made and added to the rear side of the bulkhead.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, June 11, 2019 7:34 PM
The windshield frame is very fragile and the way the kit is designed the center of the roof holds it to the rear bulkhead and the doors are hinged off that little center section too.   In order the shore up the greenhouse and be able to fill in the seams and allow the doors to operate (and to make it safer for the occupants…), I decided to add a simple roll cage.
The first hoop was made from Plastruct 3/16 tubing to replicate 2.25 inch steel tubing.  I found a roll of tape that was the approximate diameter to match the arc of the roof & doors and clamped the tubing to it while heating with a hairdryer.
When it cooled, I spot heated it again with the hairdryer to make it conform to the inside contours.  Steel pins locate it to the bulkhead and brass receivers were installed into the tub for the roll bar to slide into. 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, June 12, 2019 10:05 AM
There were gaps in both door sills and under both sides of the rear bulkhead where it meets the side pods.  I guess I should consider myself lucky that the gaps were consistent side to side.  Strips of sheet styrene were used for filler.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, June 13, 2019 9:52 AM
The engine cover does not fit as well as the front clip by a long shot.  At least the top of the leading edge lines up with the bulkhead fairly straight.
But the insides of the scoops are about 0.055 taller than the same spots on the bulkhead.
And the gaps where it meets the side pods are off in a different way on each side.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, June 13, 2019 4:22 PM
To fix the discrepancies at the scoops the outside of the bulkhead was built up with sheet styrene. 
I also trued up where the bulkhead meets the side pods.
 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, June 13, 2019 9:07 PM
After dry-fitting the engine cover and massaging the fit, I averaged out most of the ill-fitting areas and then shimmed the bottom edges with a couple blocks of styrene that were shaped to fill the gaps.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, June 14, 2019 9:10 AM
Now that the mating surfaces of the engine cover are getting close I noticed shapes at the bottom of the scoop openings in the engine cover are very different, and the one on the right does not match the contour of the bulkhead at all.  At least the one on the left follows the bulkhead even if it doesn't align to it…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, June 14, 2019 5:25 PM
I hand filed the opening and reshaped where it meets the bulkhead.  Better, but still more fine tuning needed.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, June 15, 2019 9:46 AM
The right side of the bulkhead needed to be fattened up too, both to thicken the cross-section and to bring it up to the height of the engine cover.  I used .018 sheet styrene.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, June 15, 2019 6:30 PM
I thinned the left inside of the bulkhead with a Dremel and hand sanding for continuity then added some .010 sheet styrene to bring it up to the engine cover.  At this point I'm using the doors as guides to shape the body line in the bulkhead as well as the engine cover.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, June 16, 2019 11:02 AM
Until the doors are modified and installed the work on the bulkhead and engine cover is on hold.  The front roll bar was made the same way as the rear one.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, June 17, 2019 12:05 PM
I sawed the oil and fuel fill columns off the tub.  I doubt I'll reuse them; probably machine new ones, but they are not very visible with the dash installed either…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, June 17, 2019 9:06 PM
When I mounted the front roll bar to the cowl/windshield frame I paid attention to get a good fit for the windshield.  But now the hood/fenders/nose doesn't fit very well to it.  Not a surprise and an easy tradeoff.   But it also turns out the dark blue plastic the body is molded in is really brittle. 
A goal from the start was to not have the body panels under tension when assembled, but now it is very important due to how many cracks and parts have broken under just modest stress.  Brass reinforcements have been added along the way including the pins and machined tubes for mounting points at the cowl.  To cut down on the load/stress I had to add mounting points to the front of the tub and hood too.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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