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Lola T-70 Mk III

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  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, June 2, 2019 11:43 AM
I started by cleaning up the tub and main body panels. 
Lots of filling and sanding to remove the twenty ¼ inch diameter ejection pin marks in the tub alone and general parting lines.  But still a nicely molded kit considering its age.
The insides of the body also needed to be addressed for the same issues.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    November 2004
  • From: UK
Posted by PatrickW on Sunday, June 2, 2019 3:52 PM

I'm looking forward to this build. I saw these when they were prototypes being tested at the Silverstone circuit where I was as a marshall at the time, and later as race cars! They were the loudest thing I had heard as they circulated!

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, June 2, 2019 4:46 PM
Converting the steering rack over to left-hand drive.  Part of the framework had to be cut and other areas filled for the track of the rack to slide and everything to be "flipped".  Then a new gear for the rack had to be created since the teeth were backwards.  The ejection pin holes were filled and new mounting holes for the pedal set were drilled too.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, June 3, 2019 10:32 AM
The top of the dash also needed to be converted to LHD.  I cut the pod out and a matching area on the left and swapped and blended them back together.  A little white styrene was used as filler on the new passenger side.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, June 3, 2019 4:38 PM
The front bulkhead was converted to LHD and all the holes were drilled out.  The inside was milled to be a constant thickness too.
Before:
After:

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, June 4, 2019 9:42 AM
The cowl also had to be modified for LHD.
Before:
In Progress:
Styrene was used as filler in some places; in other places the kit plastic was cut and reused.
The rivets were cut off and drilled out.
Since this car will only have one master cylinder the reservoirs for the dual set were shaved off.
The underside had to be modified as well so the steering would work properly and everything would fit.
Aluminum rivets…  Hand cut, filed and installed (some of them).
After:

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Roswell, GA USA
Posted by Ergo Proxy on Wednesday, June 5, 2019 2:26 PM

I have one of thos kits at home that I've had since the mid 80's. Still haven't built it yet. And I also have the Porsche 935 unbuilt and I bought the Scale Motorsports superkit for that one back in 2005.

Too many models to build in a lifetime.

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, June 5, 2019 3:16 PM

I've built both of the Porsche's, this one is an earlier release and it shows, but still looks to be a good kit.

 

Fitting the body panels.  I started with the side pods.  They have molded-in rivet detail along the top edges.  Those were removed and drilled out to accept small screws. 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    January 2005
  • From: sunny Sydney, Australia
Posted by nottheband on Wednesday, June 5, 2019 6:10 PM

G'day Mark.  Impressive start.  I followed your Lotus build and was amazed all the way, I expect this beautiful T70 build will be more of the same, and I'm in.  1/12 is a big scale, how long is the body, about 12" 300mm or so?  Cheers

Steve

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, June 5, 2019 6:25 PM

Yep Steve, right about 12 inches long nose to tail.  And thanks!

 

The windshield frame/cowl section of the body did not fit very well on its own or locate positively.  Brass reinforcing plates were fabricated to make aligning it easier.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, June 6, 2019 11:50 AM
.040 sheet styrene was added to make the thread blocks on the underside of the tub for the small screws that will hold it together.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, June 7, 2019 12:42 PM
The side pods are mounted to the tub and the brass reinforcements are in place.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, June 8, 2019 11:23 AM
The windshield frame/cowl has been mated to the tub and side pods.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, June 10, 2019 10:19 AM
First test fitting of the front clip.  Fits pretty well out of the box after the seams were cleaned up.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    January 2008
  • From: Plano (Dallas), Texas
Posted by mmthrax on Monday, June 10, 2019 4:49 PM

Just found this.  Always inspired by your work.

I'm on board sir.  Me and my notebook.  Big Smile

This will be another excellent build I'm sure. Yes

 

Just keep picking away at it...

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, June 10, 2019 8:59 PM

Thanks for the kind words.  Please do "ride along".  I never buit one of these before so it's a new ride for me...

 

The rear bulkhead.  It doesn't fit very well or positively so it needs to be fastened to the tub in a similar fashion as the cowl was.  It also needs to be installed so the doors will fit too.
 
A flange was added to the bottom of the bulkhead and reinforced with a dozen buttresses.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, June 11, 2019 11:12 AM
Two more brass flanges were made and added to the rear side of the bulkhead.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, June 11, 2019 7:34 PM
The windshield frame is very fragile and the way the kit is designed the center of the roof holds it to the rear bulkhead and the doors are hinged off that little center section too.   In order the shore up the greenhouse and be able to fill in the seams and allow the doors to operate (and to make it safer for the occupants…), I decided to add a simple roll cage.
The first hoop was made from Plastruct 3/16 tubing to replicate 2.25 inch steel tubing.  I found a roll of tape that was the approximate diameter to match the arc of the roof & doors and clamped the tubing to it while heating with a hairdryer.
When it cooled, I spot heated it again with the hairdryer to make it conform to the inside contours.  Steel pins locate it to the bulkhead and brass receivers were installed into the tub for the roll bar to slide into. 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, June 12, 2019 10:05 AM
There were gaps in both door sills and under both sides of the rear bulkhead where it meets the side pods.  I guess I should consider myself lucky that the gaps were consistent side to side.  Strips of sheet styrene were used for filler.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, June 13, 2019 9:52 AM
The engine cover does not fit as well as the front clip by a long shot.  At least the top of the leading edge lines up with the bulkhead fairly straight.
But the insides of the scoops are about 0.055 taller than the same spots on the bulkhead.
And the gaps where it meets the side pods are off in a different way on each side.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, June 13, 2019 4:22 PM
To fix the discrepancies at the scoops the outside of the bulkhead was built up with sheet styrene. 
I also trued up where the bulkhead meets the side pods.
 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, June 13, 2019 9:07 PM
After dry-fitting the engine cover and massaging the fit, I averaged out most of the ill-fitting areas and then shimmed the bottom edges with a couple blocks of styrene that were shaped to fill the gaps.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, June 14, 2019 9:10 AM
Now that the mating surfaces of the engine cover are getting close I noticed shapes at the bottom of the scoop openings in the engine cover are very different, and the one on the right does not match the contour of the bulkhead at all.  At least the one on the left follows the bulkhead even if it doesn't align to it…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, June 14, 2019 5:25 PM
I hand filed the opening and reshaped where it meets the bulkhead.  Better, but still more fine tuning needed.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, June 15, 2019 9:46 AM
The right side of the bulkhead needed to be fattened up too, both to thicken the cross-section and to bring it up to the height of the engine cover.  I used .018 sheet styrene.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, June 15, 2019 6:30 PM
I thinned the left inside of the bulkhead with a Dremel and hand sanding for continuity then added some .010 sheet styrene to bring it up to the engine cover.  At this point I'm using the doors as guides to shape the body line in the bulkhead as well as the engine cover.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, June 16, 2019 11:02 AM
Until the doors are modified and installed the work on the bulkhead and engine cover is on hold.  The front roll bar was made the same way as the rear one.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, June 17, 2019 12:05 PM
I sawed the oil and fuel fill columns off the tub.  I doubt I'll reuse them; probably machine new ones, but they are not very visible with the dash installed either…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, June 17, 2019 9:06 PM
When I mounted the front roll bar to the cowl/windshield frame I paid attention to get a good fit for the windshield.  But now the hood/fenders/nose doesn't fit very well to it.  Not a surprise and an easy tradeoff.   But it also turns out the dark blue plastic the body is molded in is really brittle. 
A goal from the start was to not have the body panels under tension when assembled, but now it is very important due to how many cracks and parts have broken under just modest stress.  Brass reinforcements have been added along the way including the pins and machined tubes for mounting points at the cowl.  To cut down on the load/stress I had to add mounting points to the front of the tub and hood too.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, June 18, 2019 10:29 AM
A little sheet styrene and reshaping remedied most of the discrepancy at the cowl/hood panel line.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, June 18, 2019 4:00 PM
More shimming and shoring up to try to true out the tub and body.  I added several support ribs to the tub in the side pods and the rear of the side pods are now anchored to the tub with screws too.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, June 18, 2019 8:40 PM
I designed the wheels for it in SolidWorks.  Because seven spokes…  They will be a combination of 3D grown masters and machined aluminum parts.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, June 20, 2019 3:47 PM
After I made the front wheel, (different offset), I designed the outer rims even though they will made of aluminum on the finished project.  This way I can use them for mocking up the car.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, June 21, 2019 12:09 PM
The inner door panels needed a lot of clean-up. This one still needs more…  Both inner doors mostly cleaned up and with mounting holes added.  I added mounting plates and locking strips to insides of the doors.  Dry fitting.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    January 2005
  • From: Canberra, Australia
Posted by aussiemuscle308 on Sunday, June 23, 2019 6:35 AM
amazing work here. this is already looking like an epic build.

My Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/87459383@N07/albums

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, June 23, 2019 7:47 PM

Thank you!

 

Door hinges "before".
The part that clamps the hinges to the roof didn't look strong enough to hold up to the disassembly and reassembly that this project will require so I reinforced it with stainless steel tubes that will accept the spring steel rods.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    January 2008
  • From: Plano (Dallas), Texas
Posted by mmthrax on Tuesday, June 25, 2019 9:28 AM

This is great stuff.

Seems to be fighting you, but I do appreciate your responses to the challenge and

your tips and "work arounds."

Carry on sir....

Just keep picking away at it...

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, June 25, 2019 4:54 PM

Thanks, I wouldn't say it's fighting me, I expected these issues and planned for them to some degree.  But it is a time consuming process.

 

The right side door fits better than I expected, but it needs some serious work.
The left side door does not fit as well as the right side, so I will start to rework it first. 
 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, June 27, 2019 2:20 PM
Before I can make the doors fit I need to put the center section of the roof in, and that part is too weak by itself.  So first I added the roll cage side bars.  Each side has a 0.062 steel rod for strength.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, June 28, 2019 11:06 AM
Finally the roof center section could be cemented in place.  Three steel pins help strengthen it.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, June 30, 2019 12:34 PM
After a lot of reshaping by sanding and adding material I got the left door kind of close to fitting the more complex contours of the cowl and bulkhead.  It's just sitting on the body loose.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, June 30, 2019 9:29 PM
Then I reworked the right side in a similar fashion as the left.  It still needs more work too, but not until I get the left door to this stage.
 
But the right side is hinged.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, July 1, 2019 8:57 PM
I added magnets to the doors and inside the side pods.  These will end up inside the door sill.
 
The magnets allowed me to solidly and consistently close the doors in the same locations.  I did a lot more reshaping and filling and filing.  Still plenty more work to do though.
But it was also time to check the progress with a coat of primer.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, July 2, 2019 8:46 PM
It may not look all that different from the last post, but a lot more filling and shaping has been done. 
 
The left door has been relocated on the hinges to make the top gap the same as the gap on the right door.
Both doors operate smoothly and track quite well, and they have been on and off a few times. I started building up the bottom door sill on the left door to box in the magnets and give it a proper finished look.
 
All the door gaps are starting to become somewhat uniform, but it still needs more work… 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    March 2019
  • From: Quitman, Texas
Posted by LostInStyreneAnd... on Wednesday, July 3, 2019 1:27 PM

Having seen a few of these in real life at the many vintage races I attended, I can tell you that when you're done - you'll have a better "fit & finish" than most of the 1:1 cars I've seen!   I can't wait to see the finished product - what an Amazing build!

Eric Automobile

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, July 3, 2019 8:57 PM

Thanks Eric.  Yes the ones I've seen (except the over restored ones) were rough around the edges.  I didn't want to fall back on that since this one will be a modern replica and should be a bit better finished.

 

Now that the lower parts of the doors work properly and track consistently with the magnets, I converted the hinge mounting system from screws to magnets as well.  This way I won't have to worry about damage to the outer surface of the roof when it is reassembled after final painting.
The left side hinges were beefed up and drilled for the magnets.  The right side ones still have the holes for the screws.
The slots for the hinges in the doors were widened to accept the thicker hinges and also drilled to accept the magnets.
The door still lines up like before and I can move on to finessing the fit and shape of the body and doors.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, July 5, 2019 4:59 PM
The magnetic approach worked so well I went back and re-engineered the side pods to be held in place with only three small screws on the bottom.  All the hardware that held the pods to the tub has been replaced with magnets and the screw holes filled in.  So before I can finish the doors I need to rework the fastening system for the parts they are mounted to.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, July 5, 2019 7:21 PM
To eliminate the screws that fastened the cowl to a pair of brass brackets anchored to the tub, I removed the brackets and made new parts to hold three magnets on each side.  Three more magnets were set in recessed holes in the tub and a brass tube was used to help align the set up.  The brass tube may or may not stay… This is the right side just behind the front wheel well.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, July 6, 2019 10:15 PM
It used to take me several minutes to assemble or disassemble even a couple of these parts with all the screws I used to get it trued up and properly aligned.
Now with the magnets it only takes a few seconds to completely tear down or assemble all this.  And the doors operate.  Now I think I'll redo the hood the same way.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, July 7, 2019 1:34 PM
I received the first set of wheels that Fraxional grew/printed from the SolidWorks files I made.  These are 100% raw as delivered.  Rear parts on the left and front parts on the right.  They are still on the supports and are slated to be used for mock-up only, but I may finish them just to see how they'll look.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, July 8, 2019 6:03 PM
The front hood mounting bosses were cut down and holes were milled into them to accept magnets.  1/8th inch steel rods were cut as receivers since a second pair of magnets would create too much pull for that part of the hood.  Plastic spacers center the rods in the brass tubes.  Driver's side is installed. 
Magnets were also installed in the rear-view mirror supports at the cowl edge.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, July 10, 2019 2:34 PM
I spent about a half hour removing the supports (like sprues on injection molded parts) and cleaning up the support points on these two rear wheel pieces.  There are no mold lines to deal with on 3D printed parts, but there can be a texture on some areas.  These did not need any attention in regards to smoothing texture out.  The material Fraxional used on these is more like resin than styrene in the way it sands and creates a very fine powder.  There is a mild odor, but it's not objectionable.
A little paint for the heck of it…  I played around with some weathering/chipping techniques to make it look used.  I see by the fit of the tire I can go wider with the rim.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, July 11, 2019 9:47 AM
I reworked the lower nose section that holds the driving lights and stone guard for the radiator.  It fit OK, but not positively.  I used a combination of sheet styrene and removal of some material to make it fit. 
The junction boxes for the lights house magnets in the hood section.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, July 11, 2019 3:14 PM
Now that the hood locates to the tub and center body section consistently, I reshaped the surfaces where the hood meets the cowl.  I took off a good .030 - .040 of material on the upper surfaces and did a lot of blending.  The white is the sheet styrene filler.  Not done, but good enough until I do the same to the doors and side pods and center section.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, July 12, 2019 9:11 AM
I started reworking one of the forward bulkheads/core support.  I drilled out the duct openings molded into the part and added ducting and supports on the inside so it can be installed without the flexible cooling ducts.  The elbows won't be seen when it's assembled, but I didn't want the intakes dumping into an open space.  I also shimmed the edges for a better fit.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, July 12, 2019 6:04 PM
The A-Pillar sections of the doors are inherently weak, and I could see with all the heating and bending some fractures were appearing.  They would have broken well before I could get to painting and if they broke it would affect all the fitting I had already done.  I bent some .061 spring steel reinforcements that fixed the arc to closely match that of the A-Pillar along the windshield.
The left door.
The right door.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, July 13, 2019 10:54 AM
A lot more sanding and shaping was done to the doors and roof after the doors were set in their frames and hinges and reinforced with steel, (way more than the hood received).  I added a few thousandths of an inch of material around the windshield and center of the roof and removed and added more elsewhere; as much as .030 was removed (at the bottom of the doors) in addition to what had been done previously.
The door panel lines are getting trued up and both doors operate well.
All the holes I drilled for threaded hardware have been filled too.  Since the primer has been sanded off much of the material used to reshape the doors and other parts is visible.  Clearly more work to do… but a lot of progress so far too…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, July 13, 2019 10:55 PM

And we have an action shot… 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, July 15, 2019 9:09 PM
I started making the shifter and the linkages to connect it to the shift shaft that ultimately feeds into the transmission.  All brass, hand filed and soldered.
At this point the shifter mechanism actually is functional, but will likely be "frozen" in first or neutral later.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, July 16, 2019 6:12 PM
I cleaned up and assembled the other wheels Fraxional "grew" from my files.  But I decided to try some other colors for the heck of it.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, July 19, 2019 8:08 PM
The tires were one of the parts I intended to use at the start.  I was a little concerned however when they turned out to be Bridgestones instead of Firestones as shown on the box art. 
What became a larger concern was that they were a little wonky in shape (probably from long-term storage) and there were flaps of rubber material on some of the sidewalls. 
I put the rims in them to hopefully retrain their shape and that worked well over the course of a few weeks of resting.
But when I started to sand the tread to give a scuffed look and remove the mold lines, light colored specks started to show through.  They were embedded in the material.  Removal would leave a divot or scar, so I applied some dye I use for resin casting and it hid the spots well. 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, July 20, 2019 1:07 PM
The door windows needed to be fitted now that the exterior of the doors were getting close to being fixed.  A good amount of reshaping the openings including the corners was done.  Since I didn't do anything to the openings until this point I was a little surprised at both how off one side was and how close the other was. 
I tried not to rework the clear parts, but some extending was required on the bottom edges of both main sections and shaping on other sides.  There were also a couple hairline fractures in those parts that had to be repaired too.
 
After I got the windows to fit I seamed the edges with 1000 grit sandpaper then started smoothing the faces with 1200.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, July 20, 2019 5:39 PM
All polished out…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by justmike on Monday, July 22, 2019 11:58 AM

Which begs the question; Whats the secret to extending a clear part!?!?  If you have to kill me after telling me though, maybe I don't wanna know.Big Smile

Feelings are like scents: The more they are analyzed, the worse they smell.
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Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, July 23, 2019 9:56 AM

No secret Mike, just build it up with CA.

 

I wanted to get the hinge mechanism made for the rear hatch since it's the last part of fitting up the body that needed to be done.

 
I had to start by reworking the rear bulkhead.
The rear tray has half of the hinges molded to it.  I cut them off and installed a stainless steel tube.

 

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, July 23, 2019 9:42 PM
The two little plastic parts of the hinges that mount to the engine cover didn't look like they would stand up to too much action, at least at the joint where they would be cemented.   Plus I could see they are supposed to be added after painting the exterior, further creating fit continuity issues.  The gray pieces are the modified and beefed up kit parts; the rest is scratch-built from sheet styrene.  The plan is to make the hinge system stand-alone from the body shell.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, July 25, 2019 12:40 PM
Final new part with 1/16 inch steel rod laminated in to it for strength.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, July 25, 2019 6:54 PM
The outer hinges are made of brass and styrene.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, July 25, 2019 8:16 PM
More magnets…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, July 26, 2019 4:03 PM
I started reworking the two rear supports that connect the tray to the rear bulkhead so I can continue working on the hinging of the engine cover.  I removed the posts that supported the battery box (used to be a motorized kit) and drilled out the flanges for the spare tire guides.  Since they also have suspension mounting points that will need to accept closed ended fittings I had to engineer them to facilitate those parts (that will be made later).  The first machined aluminum pieces for this project…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, July 28, 2019 8:01 PM
Brass tubing was used to make the hinges for the engine cover.  More magnets were also utilized.
 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, August 13, 2019 2:21 PM
The gas struts for the doors.
Upper hinges, acid cut brass.
The strut bodies are brass, the shafts are stainless steel.
The lower hinges are machined aluminum.
Closed.  They compress well.
Open.  They slide smoothly and provide just enough friction to keep the door open.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Quitman, Texas
Posted by LostInStyreneAnd... on Tuesday, August 13, 2019 3:33 PM

Just Incredible work!!!!   It's been a looooooooooooooong time since I've seen one up close, but I have a feeling your finished product will look better than what Lola built back in the day.   

Eric Automobile

  • Member since
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  • From: cleveland,ohio
Posted by cameraboy5 on Friday, August 16, 2019 11:32 AM
WOW! Just came across this thread Amazing work and love all of your remedies for ill fighting parts. Where are you getting the magnets from? Size?
"If its not surrounded by a corn field..... its not a real race track!!
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Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, August 30, 2019 1:45 PM

Thanks guys!

I found the magnets online, ordered from three different sources.  I'm using 1/8 x 1/16 and 3mm x 1mm.

 

The last part of fitting the door skins to the openings was to add the gaps at the bottoms of the doors.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, September 1, 2019 5:54 PM
The little winglets are shown on the box art but are not included in the kit.  Not a big deal for this project, but I wanted some on it nonetheless.  I hand cut a pair from sheet brass and slotted the nose to accept them.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, September 3, 2019 10:05 AM
Then I cut and annealed a couple strips of brass, shaped them to the fender and curvature of the winglets and soldered them in place for the mounting flanges.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, September 5, 2019 11:37 AM
I started adding the rear spoiler fairings.  Sheet styrene instead of brass, but installed in slots like the front winglets.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, September 5, 2019 9:31 PM
I added the top edge of the rear spoiler(s) by sawing a notch into the existing peak to accept some strip styrene and fairing it in.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, September 6, 2019 2:25 PM
Looks much better in primer…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, September 7, 2019 2:01 PM
The kit engine is a SB Chevy, but it doesn't quite look right on its own and it builds up differently than a "normal" American kit.   (Probably due to it being designed to house an electric motor.)  Plus the heads were molded to the block halves and the rear of the block is a separate piece creating interesting seams.
I borrowed the engine parts from the Monogram '69 Z/28 Camaro kit and made molds then cast resin copies. 
I cut off the oil filter, bellhousing & engine mounts from the oil pan, and the transmission & bellhousing from the block halves as well as the fuel pump from the front of the block.  The timing tab was also removed from the timing cover and the bolts were cut off and holes drilled in their place.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, September 7, 2019 10:05 PM
The rear of the block didn't look bad when it had a bellhousing molded to it, (and was going to be hidden by a firewall), but it turns out it is not at all symmetrical.  Since the rear of this engine will be very exposed when in the car I had to rework it.  I added 0.020 sheet styrene and reworked it.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, September 8, 2019 12:01 PM
I drew the valve covers (copied from my real car) in SolidWorks.  I'll have Fraxional "grow" them.
 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, September 9, 2019 10:26 AM
I also made the bellhousing in SolidWorks since the kit item wasn't a fit or match for the new engine.  Again Fraxional is my go-to 3D printer.  This is will be a stand-in for mocking up the engine mounts and rear suspension and might get modified later.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, September 10, 2019 3:43 PM
The bolt-on rear spoiler is made of brass.  I hand cut two identical pieces from 0.010 sheet.  Then drilled 19 holes in each and scored one side of both for the upper "tabs".
The upper "tabs" were bent using an angle template for continuity.
Then I soldered them together.  This is the rear side.
I acid cut a recess that will accept a clear spoiler element/window. This is the front side.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, September 10, 2019 8:37 PM
 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, September 12, 2019 11:50 AM
I started building the transaxle so it might be ready when I get the bellhousing from Fraxional, (the 3D printing service I've been using). 
First up was to cut off and drill out all the bolts, studs, drain plugs… and fill some sink marks.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, September 13, 2019 10:04 PM
I drew up a new Hewland transaxle rear cover because there was a sink mark where some of the lettering was.
Since the kit part had HEWLANG molded in with that sink mark, it only made sense to fix both issues this way.
I planned ahead for the mounting of the part too.

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, September 14, 2019 3:46 PM
The resin heads I cast have been reworked by removing all the molded on "bolts" and drilling out for the aluminum replacements I'll machine.  The spark plug holes have been relocated to their proper locations too.  The exhaust ports have been hogged out and the holes for the accessory mounting brackets added.
(The white head is the stock Camaro one.)

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, September 14, 2019 7:06 PM
I used the Lola kit header tubes but had to make the ends that go into the head smaller diameter.  Originally they were a constant diameter the same as the tubes.  I made a tool from an old collet to uniformly cut those ends down to a 0.13 diameter.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, September 14, 2019 7:22 PM
New header flange also designed in SolidWorks.  Heavy duty 3/8 inch thick flange for the 1- 7/8 diameter big tube headers to come.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, September 16, 2019 8:54 PM
I started working over the Z/28 water pump I copied in resin, but I realized it wasn't the best choice for this application let alone an accurate piece even for what it is supposed to represent.  The shorter Corvette pump with the oversized bearing was more appropriate even though in the end it will hardly be visible, and it will buy me more space since the engine I'm using is longer than the kit provided one.
The Tamiya water pump actually was closer looking to the short style even though it didn't measure out or and has some "interesting" details.
Here's the Lola kit part.
Having a real pump at my feet made it a lot easier to modify the part into a more accurate rendition.  It still needs the mounting hardware and heater hose fitting to be machined and the sand cast texture to be added.
I also started reworking the harmonic balancer.  I shaved it down to a proper 8" diameter and installed a brass sleeve.  I also cut the timing mark into it.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Quitman, Texas
Posted by LostInStyreneAnd... on Tuesday, September 17, 2019 7:39 AM

I feel my fingers cramping and my eyes starting to hurt just Looking at all the detail!  What an Incredible build!   Geeked

Eric Automobile

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, September 17, 2019 10:01 PM

Thanks.  My fingers get taxed sometimes too.

 

I machined a billet aluminum water pump pulley.  It's dual & deep grooved so I can run the same belt set up I have on my real car and add an alternator to this car.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, September 18, 2019 9:05 PM
Here's the matching crank pulley.
Both loosely sitting on the engine.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, September 20, 2019 9:41 AM
I made some washers and bolts and added the pump shaft and set up the mounting system for the pump pulley…
Video:
https://i.imgur.com/hpinOnZ.mp4

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, September 22, 2019 7:56 PM
I installed more magnets to attach the heads to the block.
The four holes on each head where the valve train would be are to mount the valve covers.
 
I got the bellhousing I designed back from Fraxional.  They did an excellent job of 3D growing it.  Other than removing the supports on the face that mounts to the engine, this is how it came to me.  A tiny bit of clean up is in order as it is not the higher resolution they offer.  (It was provided as a "test shot" but it is good enough to use.)
 
It aligns to the block with two dowel pins like the real ones.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, September 24, 2019 8:56 PM
Since the exhaust port spacing on my heads is different on than the Tamiya parts I had to modify the rear of the inboard tubes to meet the collectors.
I used the header flanges I drew that were printed by Fraxional and fitted the tubes to them and the heads.
And they are mounted into the heads with magnets…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, September 27, 2019 10:43 AM
Removable front engine cover for the interior.  Since the engine I'm building is larger than the kit provided item, and I'm using a dual belt pulley set-up, I had to make room for the water pump pulley.
Before:
After:

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by LostInStyreneAnd... on Monday, September 30, 2019 1:30 PM

Bow  What an Incredible Job!   I am in awe of the detail!

Eric Automobile

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    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, October 2, 2019 5:15 PM

Thanks Eric!

 

I had Fraxional grow me a second bellhousing after I reengineered the center section where the transmission mounts to it.  (Very easy to deal with this 3D printing service.)
More magnets are used to hold these sub-assemblies together.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, October 4, 2019 8:05 PM
Since I'm not using the magneto (I'll make a distributor) I have to add an alternator.  I designed a proper Delco-Remy alternator in SolidWorks and it will be printed by Fraxional. 
To make it look more realistic I made it in four main pieces.  I'll machine the pulley later as well as the other hardware and electrical connectors.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, October 7, 2019 1:15 PM
Now that I have the bellhousing to positively locate the engine, I can start to make the front motor mounts.  Good old sheet styrene fabrication…
Front:
Rear:
Dry fitted:

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, October 7, 2019 7:38 PM
Once I mocked up the heads with the headers on the engine in its final orientation due to the motor mounts I could see the headers should have a little more clearance around the rear shock upper mounting points.  They fit, but I wouldn't want the heat from them on a real car.
I used a metal wedge and a hair dryer to bend the pipes.
I had to replace the header flanges too, luckily Fraxional provided me with a second set before I decided to make this change. 
I also had to lengthen the inboard pipes on both headers with some Plastruct tubing.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: CA Gold Country foothills.
Posted by mishalah on Thursday, October 10, 2019 11:00 AM
At this point here, why didn't you just use steel or aluminum rod?

"Help me....I've fallen and I can't get up."...my models are crushing me. my pics: https://public.fotki.com/dallas916/

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Posted by mishalah on Thursday, October 10, 2019 11:37 AM

This is obviously a seriously complex and uber-detailed RE-build of what most of us assumed was a fairly accurate kit.  The amount of correction is both astounding and disheartening. 

I started this kit over 10 years ago, even bought a second one to make another version.  I made a tub from aluminum sheet and then set it aside to work on the engine, thinking I was making progress toward a better replica.  After making flared chrome intake stacks from (believe it or not) radio antenna tubes, I was working on making the exhaust better.  Then....I was told that the engine that Tamiya gave us in this version was NOT the correct one at all.....that it should be the Aston Martin DOHC V8.  Ummm...CRAP.  So, I stopped and started looking for a way to replicate that engine.  :(  Eventually, Best Balsa Kits out of Belgium came up with a whole, seriously detailed, fully pieced out version of the Aston Martin (5.0 L, I think) engine.  It looks incredible...but so is the price (around $400)).  I stopped there and put both kits away.  They sit and will most likely never get done because I have too many other WIPS and too little time...and my eyes and hands are failing me.  I love this gorgeous example of what racing gave us back then, but my brain will not let me do a half-ass job, and my arthritic/diabetic body won't let me do the work I need to.  :(  :(  :( 

 

Your work is an inspiration to serious builders.  I noticed you have a couple of sources to make parts.  I also have a 1/8 Entex Porsche RSR Turbo that stopped me at rebuilding the engine to proper configuration with the fan and alternator bracket and drive assembly that was actually used.  I never could get an accurate bracket shaped by hand, so I put that one aside.  I have LOTS of pics of the real thing, so I would really like to hand that odff to an expert parts creator.  Possible???

"Help me....I've fallen and I can't get up."...my models are crushing me. my pics: https://public.fotki.com/dallas916/

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Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, October 14, 2019 3:59 PM

No need to make more work for myself when the kit pipes were already properly molded.  There were no header flanges in the kit, and even if there were, they would have been too small for the heads I am using. 

Have you bent steel rod in that diameter before?  I have, it's a lot of work.  Same for aluminum in comparison to plastic.  Since they are not going to be raw metal finished it simply is not worth the extra work.

 

The engine in the Tamiya kit is the correct Small Block Chevy engine for the car the kit builds. 

 I do side work so yes, I might be interested in working with you on your Porsche parts.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, October 15, 2019 3:04 PM
Rear hub carriers.  Step one, remove the brake calipers.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, October 16, 2019 9:05 AM
Front spindles.  Step one, remove the brake calipers.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, October 16, 2019 12:27 PM
Rear lower control arms.  Left is kit part as it comes.  On the right is the reworked one ready for brass and aluminum hardware upgrades.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, October 16, 2019 6:23 PM
Reworked and assembled rear hub carriers.  Brass tubing was added for the hinge points and open holes.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, October 17, 2019 12:45 PM
I added two more "ears" to the front bulkhead for the front shock and upper control arm mounting points (per photos of real T-70s).

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, October 17, 2019 7:48 PM
Front upper control arms as they come in the kit.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, October 18, 2019 4:24 PM
New fittings and bushings for the front pivot points.  Machined aluminum & brass with steel reinforcements.
Both arms with upgraded front bushings and adjusters.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, October 19, 2019 11:01 AM
And new fittings for the rear pivot points, same construction as the front ones.
Upper control arms dry fitted.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, October 19, 2019 10:02 PM
I started drawing up the calipers.  This is an inboard half.  Still more details to be added.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, October 20, 2019 7:48 PM

More details and the other (outer) side.

The rotors will be machined; I just wanted a blank to make sure it would all fit later.

Now to make the pads...

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, October 21, 2019 8:10 PM
Brake Pads, more designing in SolidWorks…
Ready to send off to Fraxional for growing.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, October 26, 2019 11:03 AM
The start of the aluminum rims.  Some T6-6061 stock and a wooden angle block with 22 and 27 degree angles cut into it.  The block was indexed to the tilt-table as a secondary measure to ensure the angles were uniform on all the wheels.
First round of cutting; this will be a rear.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, October 26, 2019 2:21 PM
This is a rear…  Still raw and needs to be refined.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, October 28, 2019 3:07 PM
Here are two rears and a front on the right.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, October 29, 2019 10:16 AM
All five wheels, two rears and three fronts, (one for the spare).
 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, October 29, 2019 1:50 PM
I added the radius/fillets and then polished them up.
And a dry fitted front…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, October 29, 2019 7:02 PM
I decided a more modern set of calipers would not only look cooler, but also be more appropriate for the car with some of the other upgrades it is getting.  I made the Wilwood retrofits for the C3 Corvette calipers I made earlier.  They use the same pads.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, November 3, 2019 9:19 PM
I've been working back and forth and back again with 3D designing, old school machining and basic hand building to facilitate better fitting of the soon to be grown parts to help the fit of the end results.
I milled up caliper and rotor "blanks" out of resin to help check tolerances inside the software and to the physical parts I have.  I also had to draw up in 3D some of the kit parts I modified for spatial orientation.  Here's some screen grabs I took before sent the files off to Fraxional.
 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by IT_JEDI on Monday, November 4, 2019 12:47 PM

test

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Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, November 12, 2019 8:39 PM
These are the tie-rod ends with adjusters for toe.  Brass and aluminum loosely assembled.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, November 14, 2019 12:17 PM
I acid treated them instead of using paint.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, December 8, 2019 9:46 PM
I got some more of my 3D parts from Fraxional over the weekend.    All parts are raw as "grown", but I have cleaned off the supports.  Here's a few.
Flywheel with pressure plate & clutch.  Small 153 tooth flywheel.
Front side installed in bellhousing.
New corrected Hewland rear transaxle cover.
 Engineered to mount with magnets.  (I had the bosses for the magnets grown into the part.)
Full engine & transaxle dry fitted together.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, December 10, 2019 5:11 PM
Half shaft yokes 3D printed by Fraxional.  The shafts are brass; the larger one has already been treated with acid for the color.  Just dry fitted together.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, December 24, 2019 11:49 AM
I took a shot at growing some parts myself.  Here's a valve cover.  It's hard to capture the details in the clear resin in photos.  I plan to cast copies in opaque urethane resin.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, December 26, 2019 5:35 PM
The alternator parts were grown by Fraxional, but I neglected to send one of the part files so the clear piece is the inner/center section that I grew rather than wait. 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, December 26, 2019 9:02 PM
I made some design changes to the wheel centers and rather than wait for Fraxional to grow new ones for me I took a shot at it by doing a front first.  (My impatience; they have good turn-around times).  I can't get the quality that Fraxional does (at least at this time…) and so I had to spend a couple hours fine tuning it on the mill.  Not sure if this will be the final master or if I will go back to my original plan of having Fraxional grow these wheel parts.  Primer will help determine that path…
Doesn't look too bad with my aluminum outer rim on it though.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, December 27, 2019 3:24 PM
Brake pad masters ready to have a mold made.  My 3D files grown by Fraxional.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, December 28, 2019 6:02 PM
I grew the masters of the Wilwood calipers I designed but was not able to get the outsides to look their best without sacrificing the details on the insides where the pads mount.
I machined and hand finished the insides to accept the pads and to fit together.
Fronts on top, rears on the bottom.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    November 2019
Posted by mrgts1 on Sunday, December 29, 2019 10:15 AM

Mark, what printer did you purchase out of curiosity? I bought a Epax myself a few months ago to print all my parts out for the pro mod.

Paul

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, December 29, 2019 6:29 PM

I'm using a Photon S.  

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, December 31, 2019 5:12 PM
This is the inside of the valve cover master.  While I designed it with mounting features they filled in when the part was grown.  So I milled those features in by hand.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, December 31, 2019 5:28 PM
I wasn't satisfied with the last wheel I grew so I redesigned a few parts of it and made a new one.  The front came out fine; it was the back side I didn't like.
It like the previous one required a good bit of post-machine work (it was designed to have that work done) and I think it is an improvement.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, January 2, 2020 12:07 PM
The valve cover pattern is done and ready to have a mold made from it.
Same for the calipers.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, January 3, 2020 2:29 PM
Once in primer I still was not satisfied so I re-engineered the wheel to be three pieces instead of two.
This is the new spoke piece as it was grown.
And then machined.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, January 3, 2020 3:56 PM
This is the rear section of the new rim design; it still needs to be final machined.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, January 3, 2020 6:37 PM
The U.V. resin is very hard and brittle.  That part did not survive the machining process.
I started growing a beefier part and realized I could probably machine one from scratch faster.
I was correct, made this from scratch and the printer is still running.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, January 7, 2020 11:01 AM
I grew a new alternator fan but the inside filled in, a common issue with this printer.
So I machined it out.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    January 2015
Posted by mustang1989 on Tuesday, January 7, 2020 4:29 PM

All's I've gotta say about this is.....

Being really stupid is the new smart!! 

    Joe

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, January 18, 2020 3:08 PM
I had a bit of a setback when it turned out that the platinum based RTV I use primarily would not cure against the U.V. cured 3D resin from the printer.  Even after using the sealing materials that worked as barriers in the past, the molds were not curing and worse than the time loss was it making gooey messes on my patterns. That took many hours over several days to clean up.
I invested in some tin based RTV and that seems to be the right stuff for this resin. 
Here are the calipers and one pair of pads I'll use on the car.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    January 2020
  • From: Florida USA
Posted by Gooch01 on Saturday, January 18, 2020 7:21 PM

I really like what your doing keep up the great work 

Regards 

Dave 

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, January 21, 2020 10:57 AM

Thanks Dave.

 

These are the resin versions of the valve covers.

With an internal mounting system to hold and align the magnets to the ones in the heads.

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, January 22, 2020 11:56 AM
I redesigned the rear wheel to be three pieces like the fronts and restyled the back of the spokes to match too.  This is the raw 3D grown/printed master before machining.
 
And after…
(The black marks are index points for making the mold.)

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, January 23, 2020 9:46 AM
I machined tool to make controlling the parting line in the wheel molds easier. 
It locks into the back of the wheel center like the rear piece of the rims.
Clay is used to seal one side.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, January 26, 2020 2:00 PM
Then I cast the side that contains the face of the wheel in RTV so that the seams are all on the inside of the wheel and quite minimal at that.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: CA Gold Country foothills.
Posted by mishalah on Saturday, February 1, 2020 7:40 AM
Those valve covers are outstanding!

"Help me....I've fallen and I can't get up."...my models are crushing me. my pics: https://public.fotki.com/dallas916/

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, February 1, 2020 7:17 PM

Thanks!

 

The half-shafts are done for now.  The yokes are cast resin (dyed black) copies of 3D parts.
The shafts are brass acid treated for the dark finish. 
Each U-joint has four bearings/caps (with E clips) and they work.  The half-shafts telescope too.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    January 2020
  • From: Florida USA
Posted by Gooch01 on Saturday, February 1, 2020 8:36 PM

Excellent work your cad work is spot on next-level stuff.  

Regards 

Dave 

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, February 5, 2020 6:07 PM

Thanks Dave!

 

I was going to have to adjust the rotor hubs (or make shims) so I decided to mill a new one out of resin stock instead of editing the 3D file and growing a replacement.  This was quicker too.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    January 2015
Posted by mustang1989 on Thursday, February 6, 2020 7:59 AM

Always good to pop in on this one and see the work going on. Lookin' good so far.

Being really stupid is the new smart!! 

    Joe

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, March 8, 2020 4:21 PM
I designed and then grew the rotors several times over the course of a few months.  The detail I want is just not something my printer can do on both sides.  (One side is great.)  I redesigned them adding more material so I could post-machine  after growing them, but the material is too brittle when cured, and too soft and pliable before fully curing.  I was able to make them look really good after machining, but every one of them had micro fractures (or worse) that would show up under paint.
The good side of them:
The rough side of them before machining:

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, March 8, 2020 4:52 PM
So after way too much time and effort without acceptable results, I went back to my original plan to make the rotors before I got the 3D printer…  Good old machining.
First I milled in the rectangular vent holes around the perimeter.
Then I cross-drilled 60 holes in each side.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, March 9, 2020 3:55 PM
As satisfied I was at the time, the more I looked the more I thought I could do better…  So more time on the mill and now I think I have what I want.  These cross-drilled holes scale out to ¼ inch in diameter.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, April 16, 2020 1:42 PM
I decided to go with my earlier rotor configuration; slotted and cross-drilled.
Raw rotor blanks cut from high-pressure cast blank aluminum composite material.
I milled the vents around the perimeter and faced them.
I cross-drilled and slotted them.  They are directional.
This is the natural cut finish of the material.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, May 6, 2020 10:08 AM
One year "birthday" for this project.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, May 13, 2020 8:58 PM
I got the Wilwood calipers painted, going for a ceramic finish look.  They are Corvette retrofit units I designed in SolidWorks and 3D printed before hand-finishing the masters then casting resin copies.  I used the new Tamiya LP-6 Pure Blue for the color.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, May 14, 2020 10:21 AM
The new 3D printed caliper brackets I designed and grew to mount the calipers have been attached to the front spindles.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    December 2010
  • From: Hillsboro, TX
Posted by ibj40 on Thursday, May 14, 2020 2:19 PM

Just popped in as this came up in a new posts search.

You are amazing, with your skills and imagination.

I am in awe!

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, May 14, 2020 9:43 PM

Thank you ibj40, that is very kind of you to say!

 

I carefully saved the rear caliper mounts on the hub carriers when I cut off the molded on calipers from the kit.  But those had to go too because the larger Wilwood calipers couldn't be mounted to them.  Again, these are 3D parts I rendered in SolidWorks and printed.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, May 15, 2020 1:51 PM
Composite brake pads.  They have been seated and used just a little bit…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, May 15, 2020 9:04 PM
The pads are installed and the calipers have been dry set up on their respective bracketry.
The rotors, hubs, calipers and pads are all scratch-built. The slide pins are polished steel, but still more hardware to machine for the calipers.
Rears:
Fronts:

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, May 17, 2020 8:03 PM
I had to make the coil over shocks next to continue mocking up the suspension.
Shock bodies…


 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, May 18, 2020 5:32 PM
Spring tension adjusters/lock rings.  The taller ones fit inside the springs.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, May 18, 2020 7:11 PM
Tops of the shocks with the piston shafts.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Monday, May 18, 2020 9:01 PM
All press-fitted machined aluminum with the kit provided springs (also friction fit).
I'll paint the springs later.  At least now I can continue engineering and building other pieces of the car…
Yes, there are rubber bushings for the eyelets and of course they work.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, May 19, 2020 2:12 PM
Front shocks installed…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, May 19, 2020 3:53 PM
Rear shocks installed…
I also turned an aluminum pulley to drive the alternator and it's mounted to the half-shaft.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, May 19, 2020 4:50 PM
Finally, and for the first time it is up on its wheels so I can get an idea of where the ride height is.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, May 20, 2020 10:36 PM
Back to working on the alternator; because it has become relevant to the suspension.
More fabrication…

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, May 23, 2020 2:39 PM
Alternator bracket.  I designed it in SolidWorks and grew it.
Alternator drive pulley.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, May 23, 2020 6:09 PM
Assembled alternator bolted to the bracket.  I machined the hardware.
(The fan spins too.)  Still some detail painting to do…
 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, May 23, 2020 6:21 PM
I had to make an offset pulley for the alternator to clear the transmission mounts.  The ratio comes out to the alternator turning about 3000 RPM at 100MPH.
Alternator assembly loosely fitted to the car.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, May 31, 2020 1:41 PM
I drew up the base of the intake manifold and did a test print.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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