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LHD Gulf Seven

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  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
LHD Gulf Seven
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, July 06, 2017 12:25 PM

 

This was a factory built Caterham model from Tamiya I bought in 2002 so I could display it next to the Red Super Seven I built and heavily modified/detailed to show the difference between what the kit builds straight from the box and the changes I did. 

 

I took it apart and I am going to make it Left Hand Drive along with some other upgrades.  I had already begun tinkering with it when I took this picture of it looking like a pile of junk.

 

You can see more of this in the June 2017 issue of Scale Auto in the article titled From Right to Left.

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    December, 2005
  • From: southeast Texas
Posted by texwardfan on Thursday, July 06, 2017 1:16 PM
Looks like this will be a great fixer upper.
  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, July 06, 2017 7:02 PM
I usually start with the wheels and brakes on these reworked or fabricated Sevens, this one is no exception. I milled these cross-drilled directional carbon rotors from raw stock I cast out of aluminum impregnated resin.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, July 07, 2017 9:53 AM

 

I milled a set of aluminum hubs for the front brakes.  The parts at the bottom of the photo have been acid dipped to create the finish.

 

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by mustang1989 on Friday, July 07, 2017 12:39 PM

This is going to be one serious build is all I've gotta say. Surprise

Being really stupid is the new smart!! 

    Joe

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, July 07, 2017 4:31 PM

 

The front hubs are assembled. Again acid was used to make the final finish. 

 

 

The studs are the only thing I used from the kit and are a press in fit.

 

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    March, 2017
Posted by Moparlover64 on Saturday, July 08, 2017 1:06 AM

Looking Awsome I'm tinkeringaround with a shereline 4000 lathe n mill. Havent quite figured out the mill but got me a press n a set of end mills lathe is proving to be fun gotta grab an xyaxiscmill vise I'm so far eye balling and freehanding but have bought some calipers and micrometers n measuring devices we 'll.  Maybe you'll share some info n talent with me like a good tool n metals suppliers n such

Moparlover64

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, July 08, 2017 10:44 AM

Sure, I'll be glad to help.  Let me know if you have any specific questions.  I have been using Industrial Metal Supply for stock, plus just keeping my eyes open for scrap aluminum.

 

 

 

These are the assembled front rotors/hubs.

 

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    March, 2017
Posted by Moparlover64 on Saturday, July 08, 2017 11:13 AM

I've had some kns brass n aluminum stock from a hobby shop I bought out years ago but I been scrapping too. I operated a few lathes in the day always wanted one so at 52 I bought this used shereline I've made a few pieces already. Bought almost everything else at harbor freight so far. Since moving back home I'm still setting up shop but I'm getting close to operational. Got 3 major projects going my hobby room, my 1to1 garage and my honeyddo list of remodeling . here's my email dmbrickwood6404@gmail.com I'm Dave email me with SAE forum in subject line so I don't trash it ill share a few ppics of my setup would love to see others set up too thanks always dave

Moparlover64

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, July 08, 2017 5:54 PM

 

These are the raw machined parts for the rear hubs.  Being similar to the fronts sped up the process of making them.

 

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, July 08, 2017 9:26 PM

 

And the finished assembled rear hubs, studs and rotors.  No paint, just treated/raw materials.

 

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    March, 2017
Posted by Moparlover64 on Sunday, July 09, 2017 11:34 AM

Incredible detail mark you're doing some Awsome stuff I lost all my emails yesterday so I lost the links ya sent me. think I'm gonna need a magnifier window to be able to do that stuff lol

Moparlover64

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, July 09, 2017 12:14 PM
These four corners are ready to be bagged until final assembly of the car.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 1:48 PM
I masked off the FORD lettering and filed off the "bolt detail" and drilled for the new hardware then textured the cam cover.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 5:30 PM
The lettering was repainted after the final dark metallic gray color was applied. (The texture looks a lot coarser in the photos than it actually is.)

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    March, 2017
Posted by Moparlover64 on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 5:48 PM

All ya need is a greasy parts washer sitting by and I'd swear it was real

Moparlover64

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, July 12, 2017 10:06 AM
I machined the bolts, washers and fittings and installed them by press fit. (Some of them may have to come out later to mount some brackets.)

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, July 12, 2017 2:52 PM
I milled the oil cap for it from aluminum; I'll make the decals for that later. This subassembly will be bagged until needed.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Sunday, July 16, 2017 4:00 PM
This is the steering rack from brass tube and sheet stock. The inner workings of it are made of rod and tubing.  Painted and assembled. The tie rod halves are pinned so the ends can pivot when the rack is slid side to side. I made the bellows by machining a master and casting them with rubber-like resin that was dyed black.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    March, 2017
Posted by Moparlover64 on Sunday, July 16, 2017 8:12 PM

Man thats awsome wish I was that good looks so real 

Moparlover64

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Tuesday, July 18, 2017 2:17 PM
The front control arms are cast in Zamac as the exact same parts for both sides so the sway bar receiver (on the upper arm) ends up being different from side to side instead of mirror imaged. So I filled them in and reshaped and drilled them to accept the sway bar. Also the shocks snap onto the lower arms leaving the bottom of the shock eye open, not realistic but easy to assemble. To make it so I can install closed loop shock eyes I cut out the mount from the A-arm and drilled a hole to use hardware like the real cars. I added a brass section to beef up the parts before cut out the shock mount, and to make it look like the beefier optional part. Before:  After:

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    March, 2017
Posted by Moparlover64 on Tuesday, July 18, 2017 2:28 PM

Man I hope you made or make a set of keys to cause the level of detail you achieving I think it'll start up and be drivable when you're done all I can say is wow incredible

Moparlover64

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, July 19, 2017 11:10 AM

Oh great. Thanks Mopar.  One more thing I have to make now...

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

TnT
  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by TnT on Wednesday, July 19, 2017 1:06 PM

Holy crap. Friggin nuts. Over the top. Man you retired? I barely have time to build out of the box, and here you are building the real deal. Skills like that you should make a crank and pistons and just build a working motor. Now i know what a scale master builder is. It is you.  So do you cast then turn your rotors? I did read about your build. I would need a year off to even begin to build that. 

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, July 19, 2017 6:41 PM

No I'm not retired, in fact I am quite busy designing 3D models for car body patterns and drawing decal artwork for Scale-Master Decals.  Not to mention building and writing for Scale Auto...  This is just how I relax.  Yes, the material was cast into raw stock then milled, (not technically turned) and drilled. 

 

 

 

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Wednesday, July 19, 2017 6:54 PM

One of the fenders was slightly damaged during the tear down.  (In fact I found several pieces that were broken or cracked at the screw-together points when they were taken apart; probably due to the tightness of the original assembling.)

 

I also thought they would look more accurate if all the mounting holes were the same.  Straight from the kit two "holes" on each fender are actually slots for ease of assembly.  I filled them in and redrilled them while fixing the broken piece.  I also filled in the holes for the side marker lights and the rather obstinate ejection marks on the underside.

 

I added seven evenly spaced but different sized holes (larger to smaller front to rear) for letting air out at higher speeds.  

 

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    March, 2017
Posted by Moparlover64 on Wednesday, July 19, 2017 7:11 PM

Dam mark maybe you should come up and do the butterfly hood and grill on my 41 dam nice wirk

Moparlover64

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Thursday, July 20, 2017 8:11 AM

 

To limit the size and therefore amount of debris that could get through those holes I made rock screens from some fine steel hydraulic filter material.  Holes were drilled through the screens and then correlating ones into the fenders. 

 

Small clamps to spread the load were made from 0.004 thick sheet plastic. 

 

The screen assemblies are just sitting loose next to their final placement.  Mounting hardware will be made later…

 

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, July 21, 2017 9:02 AM

 

Dipstick. All brass.

 

 

 

 

The stripped down engine block.  Since I relocated the alternator to the other side I'll have to address the area it used to mount to.

 

 

 

 

Painted dipstick, dry fitted to partially reworked and repainted engine block.

 

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, July 22, 2017 9:23 AM

 

The timing belt had rotted and disintegrated (not that I was going to use it…) so I milled a new one from a black zip-tie.  Learning from the last time I was able to make this one even thinner so it will wrap around the cogs easier.

 

 

I made this jig for the last Super Seven I built to preload a memory into the belt.  It will stay in it for a few days in direct sunlight when possible, (instead of a week like last time).  It isn't critical for the belt to hug the jig; the teeth will engage the cogs and lock it in place on the model.

 

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

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