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Pro Street Mustang

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  • Member since
    May 2008
Pro Street Mustang
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, January 17, 2004 10:54 PM
has anyone seen or built the pro street mustang by amt?i haven't seen one yet and was wanting to know if it is a good kit or notQuestion
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, January 18, 2004 1:50 AM
Hopefully it will be a "decent" AMT kit but.....Im not holding my breath, I havent seen it upclose yet but if I do I will let you know of my impression and try to be as un-biased as I can.
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, January 18, 2004 3:57 AM
i've seen pictures of the box art looks like an old mpc gasser made street legal
  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Westland Michigan
Posted by KRIS MORGAN on Sunday, January 18, 2004 11:38 AM
I have this kit and, Like tc noticed in the pics this is not really a "pro street" but rather an old gasser. It has a one piece flip-up frontend, the slicks hang out of the quarters, it has a S.O.H.C. 427 w/ a blower. It is not the greatest kit as far as details go but, it is a cool old kit. If you are looking for a super clean modern pro street, this is not the kit to find it. This is a gasser and, depicts that subject fairly well. Hope I could help you out some.

Hockey players wear numbers because, they cannot always be identified by dental records. Lets go Red Wings!!

  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, January 20, 2004 6:30 PM
thanx for the info kris!i like the old gassers so i guess i'll go out and get one.if nothing else it would be a good starting point for a pro street
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, January 20, 2004 8:46 PM
Whats the diff between pro street and gasser?
  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Westland Michigan
Posted by KRIS MORGAN on Thursday, January 22, 2004 2:46 PM
Well gassers are full tilt old school drag racers, I think they ran from the early 60s to the early 70s. They were built from real factory cars. They eventualy evolved to pro-stockers. These are full tube chassis race cars that share very little with a factory stock car, besides looks. A pro street is supposed to look like a pro stock race car but, be set up for street use. Backin the late 70s early 80s this became a popular trend in the full scale car world, In all reality most of the early pro streeters were anything but reliable street cars. Most were simply trailer queen wanna be's. They were often "over built" and could not hit the streets without over heating or breaking down. The latest trend in pro streeting seems to be a back basics approach,a tubbed car with a reliable drive train,simple one color paint job and, many seem to retain a "somewhat" stock interior. All this is to thebest of my knowledge, if anyone has more knowledge on this subject please feel free to correct me.

Hockey players wear numbers because, they cannot always be identified by dental records. Lets go Red Wings!!

  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, January 22, 2004 5:41 PM
I think that gassers had to run off pump gas.
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, January 22, 2004 6:06 PM
Thanks for the reply Kris.
Stoney
  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Westland Michigan
Posted by KRIS MORGAN on Thursday, January 22, 2004 11:00 PM
Stoney no trouble at all,thats the cool thing bout this site everybody helpin one another

Hockey players wear numbers because, they cannot always be identified by dental records. Lets go Red Wings!!

  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, January 23, 2004 2:05 AM
You are close on that kris. Gasser's became the Half between FX/A and Funny Car because of the short'n wheel base and they looked funny . FX/A was Factory Expermintal /A class that ended up being today's Pro Stock. You had to run what you could get from the factory but with very little changes. Pro Street realy came in around the early mid 80s.. Before this it was Street Machine.
Street Machine : Biggest Motor you can build in a non flashy Paint job and the wide's and biggest rear tires you could ram under her and still hang out 6" rule in most states.
Some one then came and said wow lets tub them put tube chassis to lighten it up and shuve 33" Mickys under her with a 9" rear and keep the tires under the fenders and the police will not bother you. So Pro Street was born. Now it tunner car's turn to take a shot at this. Can they run with a full blown Pro Street yes only because of the weight and that is all they have to keep them from being ran over.
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, January 23, 2004 12:05 PM
Dang!! You guys know your car history. BowBow
Thanks, Stoney
  • Member since
    January 2004
Posted by slotcaracer on Friday, January 23, 2004 3:36 PM
I have a beat up old original MPC Ohio George mustang gasser, I built it back in the seventies, rebuilt it in the late eighties, and it kinda fell apart again. It has been sitting in my spares box with the intent to build again someday. I jumpd on the pro street mustang as it was pretty obvious what it was, it is a reissue, with slight changes of the old Ohio George gasser kit. While I have not matched every single part, and I will let you know the wheelie bars and parachute are left out of the kit, and the flip front end is missing the "scoop", AND the slicks are ridiculously wide along with more current wheel offerings in the new kit, this is the old kit that fetches in excess of $150 on ebay these days.
So if you want an old classic mustang gasser, you can have it, just add correct wheels and tires, a chute and wheelie bars and you have it.

Stone Woods and Boyd campaigned a very similar car to Ohio George (Mustang) and although I have not researched the details, the hood has only a minimal scoop. It would be pretty easy to modify the hood in the new pro street kit to make a replica of the old Swindler A gasser car.

With a bit more work on the hood, and some decals from Fred Cady, you can once again build the Malco Gasser of Ohio George.

Gassers were born sometime in the fities, when hot rodders began to strap old GMC truck blowers on the big blocks of the day and jam tehm into small cars that were available then. This was long before the camaro, the mustang or vegas came along, there were old Anglias, willys and austins around cheap, thus was born the classic blown gassers. These were high and short wheelbase with too much power, on too small a tire and made for a hairy ride, this was also the era of laughable safety equipment.

Through the late sixies, performance improved to high 8 second trips in excess of 160 mph. Ford motors requested that Ohio George run a ford body since he was running their engines and getting their backing, thus the 67 malco gasser shed the old 33 willlys image and the mustang was born. From the late sixties to the death of the blown gassers in the very early seventies, racers quickly evolved into more slippery cars like Opel GT's and cadets and others. The evolution of the AFX class into the funny car took place during this era nad captured fan interest, the gassers were penciled out of the NHRA in 72 or so.

I remember watching one of the northeastern greats, Jim Oddy who ran an Austin at Niagara Dragway in 1970, giant wheelstands and hairy runs made for exciting racing.
  • Member since
    January 2004
Posted by slotcaracer on Friday, January 23, 2004 3:54 PM
Oh yeah.....to clear up some old drag history.

The factory experimantals evolved into funny cars as any fuel, injectors, blowers and even tube frames and glass one piece bodies became part of that scene as the rules were so loose on FX. By 1970 the funny car as we know it evolved and NHRA made a seperate class for them. The FX class was redefined and survived until the early eighties as a pro stock clone with different cubic inch to weight class breaks. By the early eighties, NHRA killed off modified eliminator and melded it's classes into Super stock or comp and in Competition eliminator, there were far too many class types that were almost identical, in the paring down, FX was dropped from the rule book.

FX originated in the mid sixties as stock class racers began to alter wheelbases and add significant hop ups and fule additives, so FX is really rooted in Stock.

Pro stock also roots out of stock via Superstock. Stockers were being built with big block motors, lightweight components and factory backing in the early sixties (remeber the ramchargers, the dodge golden comandos, the little old lady from pasadena?) As these stockers evolved they set off a super stock class that allowed for more mods. By the end of the sixties, Teams like Sox and Martin, Bill Jenkins and others had developed Super-superstockers which became Pro stock in 1971. Early Pro stocks were tubbed full frame camaros, dudas and the like with regular manual trannys and carberated big blocks capable of wheelstanding mid 9's at over 140.

  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, January 23, 2004 10:28 PM
Dyno Don and My Father's 409s that was ran in NHRA in1960 was FX/A so they where there before the mid 60s..
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Watertown ny
Posted by gratch73a on Saturday, February 7, 2004 2:35 PM
I have it, i got it for christmas 03. It'll take me a year or so to get to it. I did open it and from the looks it'll be a blast to build. From what i understand it is an old mpc mold. If you have built it you know what it's like, if not i guess you gotta get one.Wink

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