SEARCH SCALEAUTOMAG.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

WIP 1965 Ford Mustang pickup

1031 views
6 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    March, 2013
WIP 1965 Ford Mustang pickup
Posted by Perpetualfanboy on Tuesday, August 06, 2019 6:14 PM

So I had this Mustang coupe lying around that I had got about a year ago with a group of parts and pieces. I don't have any pics handy of how I originally got it, but let me tell you it was the product of the average 9 year old's enthusiasm....a near complete glue bomb. It appeared to be the AMT '64 1/2 - '65 Mustang that you could build as a coupe or convertible. Well, the previous owner made it into a coupe and seemed to use the entire tube of glue doing so. There was huge globs of dried glue where the roof met the body on the rear deck, the hood was glued shut, and various spots touched by glue covered hands. The builder also made a tonneau cover from a rag and installed it under the hardtop(!) and then topped it off with various racing decals.

And even though I've never had much of an affinity for early Mustangs, I knew I wanted to do something with this one. Something different. So I started by removing the top and opening up the hood. Thankfully the glue was very old , so it didn't take as much coaxing. The windshield, on the other hand, was a different story. A lower section cracked and broke. At least the frame stayed intact.

For the last year, I thought about the variety of Mustang pickups out there, so I thought I'd go with that. One thing led to another and next thing, the rear deck amd trunk are being cut out. Then the roof is being shortened and glued to the windshield frame.

Then the entire rear seat area was cut out ( the pan was back halved up to the end of the center console. I'll keep that for a future project ;) ) and the pan was capped by a section of the cut out trunk. The idea is to use as many of the original pieces as possible, keeping with the whole "Ship of Theseus" thing ( more about that in another thread.....). And speaking of that ship, I didn't use the original chassis because the two exhausts cross into one pipe like the entry level V-8. Since I had an original issue GT style rear pan with dual exhausts I wanted to use, that was a no-go.

That's where the donor car comes in: a later issue AMT '66 Mustang coupe. It was glued together with that appeared to be Elmer's Glue, so taking it apart was no problem. It also had the upgraded dual exhaust chassis. Now the body, interior pan, and chassis are together, in a temporary sense, anyway. Next comes the bed. Originally, the floor was going to be glued in place onto the chassis, but that was going to be awkward. So instead, the wheelwells were sawed away from the chassis at the point where the floor met the bottoms and they were glued in place together inside the rear of the body as a unit. Then after gluing in scrap plastic as sort of a mold, quick set resin was poured into the sides ( kinda similar to a 1:1 fiberglass job), foming the sides of the bed. It didn't come out perfect, but next time will be better. In fact, I might use Miliput next time; It's easier to work with. Then just add a front wall for the bed and cut away a tailgate and that's where it winds up in the pics.

 

Now I have to say that all of this came about spontaneously in a fit....well, just a fit. I had no idea where this was going or any preconceived plans whatsoever......well, except for a few stray ideas here and there.

Orphans welcome!

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by Perpetualfanboy on Friday, August 09, 2019 8:37 PM

A little further along. The front pan is glued and I'm trying out a set of Astro slot mags sourced from the '65 Riviera kit. The aim for this build will be of a one-off mid '60s mild custom that had been long forgotten.

This was done by cutting off the wheelwells and adding sheet styrene pieces. The firewall was positioned first so I had something to glue the rearward sections of the sides to so they could be canted slightly diagonal. The "shock towers" were made with square cut styrene cut into a trapezoidal shape ( note the pen marks). The tops are actually axle bosses from the Astro wheels. They were cut off so the wheels could be used with the '66 Mustang's kit supplied wheel backs. The bosses were then glued to the tops of the trapezoids about halfway around, allowed to dry and then glued to the engine bay sides right where the front wheels would be.

  

Then I took a paper clip, bent it around a piece of .030 round, and cut the excess of both, leaving a longer piece of paper clip. The paper clip was then glued into the tower hole and quick set resin was poured into the bottom to keep everything firm. Styrene strip was also added to the hood sides and the radiator top.

Now, it may have been a lot easier to surgically implant an engine bay from another model, say the AMT '67 Mustang fastback ( the newer issue), but I got so caught up in the moment, it didn't even occur to me. That and the fact that I have no other scrap Mustangs lying about and I'm not too crazy about parting out any kits.

Orphans welcome!

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by Perpetualfanboy on Wednesday, August 14, 2019 2:01 PM

Dusted on some primer and did a little more bodywork. Also added onto the roof trim and am trying to reconcile the b-pillar with the hump on the sides.

This was my first attempt to attach the tailgate using 3/64" brass rod and the spaces on the side. It looked okay, but didn't function as smoothly as I hoped. That would be replaced by L-shaped bent paper clips glued on each side of the tailgate. That allowed for a lot more wiggle room.

Orphans welcome!

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by Perpetualfanboy on Monday, August 19, 2019 7:10 PM

The engine for the most part is done. This is the kit engine topped with a parts box Ford air cleaner and a distributor also from the parts box. It is built as a C-code 225 hp 289 ci 4 bbl w/ 4 spd. No A/C, no power steering, no power brakes. Not really top of the line, but not from the budget area of the car lot, either. 

The braces are scratchbuilt and the radiator is a slightly warped piece from the parts box. 

 

Orphans welcome!

  • Member since
    August, 2015
  • From: Hamptonville, NC
Posted by TarheelRick on Tuesday, August 20, 2019 7:00 AM

Interesting concept.  I like the work you have done.  Keep those updates coming.

I build models because I can't afford the real thing!

  • Member since
    March, 2010
Posted by leapin leo on Sunday, August 25, 2019 9:28 PM

Built one of those about 10 years ago, used the roof/back window from the Ford Ranger pk. I hand formed the  bed out of ribbed styrene, to give it a bed liner look. Good job on the conversion.

Perpetualfanboy

So I had this Mustang coupe lying around that I had got about a year ago with a group of parts and pieces. I don't have any pics handy of how I originally got it, but let me tell you it was the product of the average 9 year old's enthusiasm....a near complete glue bomb. It appeared to be the AMT '64 1/2 - '65 Mustang that you could build as a coupe or convertible. Well, the previous owner made it into a coupe and seemed to use the entire tube of glue doing so. There was huge globs of dried glue where the roof met the body on the rear deck, the hood was glued shut, and various spots touched by glue covered hands. The builder also made a tonneau cover from a rag and installed it under the hardtop(!) and then topped it off with various racing decals.

And even though I've never had much of an affinity for early Mustangs, I knew I wanted to do something with this one. Something different. So I started by removing the top and opening up the hood. Thankfully the glue was very old , so it didn't take as much coaxing. The windshield, on the other hand, was a different story. A lower section cracked and broke. At least the frame stayed intact.

For the last year, I thought about the variety of Mustang pickups out there, so I thought I'd go with that. One thing led to another and next thing, the rear deck amd trunk are being cut out. Then the roof is being shortened and glued to the windshield frame.

Then the entire rear seat area was cut out ( the pan was back halved up to the end of the center console. I'll keep that for a future project ;) ) and the pan was capped by a section of the cut out trunk. The idea is to use as many of the original pieces as possible, keeping with the whole "Ship of Theseus" thing ( more about that in another thread.....). And speaking of that ship, I didn't use the original chassis because the two exhausts cross into one pipe like the entry level V-8. Since I had an original issue GT style rear pan with dual exhausts I wanted to use, that was a no-go.

That's where the donor car comes in: a later issue AMT '66 Mustang coupe. It was glued together with that appeared to be Elmer's Glue, so taking it apart was no problem. It also had the upgraded dual exhaust chassis. Now the body, interior pan, and chassis are together, in a temporary sense, anyway. Next comes the bed. Originally, the floor was going to be glued in place onto the chassis, but that was going to be awkward. So instead, the wheelwells were sawed away from the chassis at the point where the floor met the bottoms and they were glued in place together inside the rear of the body as a unit. Then after gluing in scrap plastic as sort of a mold, quick set resin was poured into the sides ( kinda similar to a 1:1 fiberglass job), foming the sides of the bed. It didn't come out perfect, but next time will be better. In fact, I might use Miliput next time; It's easier to work with. Then just add a front wall for the bed and cut away a tailgate and that's where it winds up in the pics.

 

Now I have to say that all of this came about spontaneously in a fit....well, just a fit. I had no idea where this was going or any preconceived plans whatsoever......well, except for a few stray ideas here and there.

 

  • Member since
    December, 2006
Posted by hachirokami on Tuesday, August 27, 2019 9:07 AM

If you need further inspiration for the tailgate check out the Ford Durango.  A Ford sponsored "Ranchero" made from a ford fairmount futura.

 

Great progress,  by the way.

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

FREE MONTHLY NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our privacy policy