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Baremetal Deuce HiBoy Roadster - Completed with Final Photos

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  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Sunday, June 30, 2019 3:09 PM

Thanks Eric! Much appreciated. Glad you dig it!

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    March, 2019
  • From: Quitman, Texas
Posted by LostInStyreneAnd... on Wednesday, June 05, 2019 10:00 AM

That whole thing is simply Amazing!  what an incredible technique amd the look is just perfect!

Eric Automobile

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Tuesday, June 04, 2019 10:34 PM

Tim Boyd

Bernard....that one came out great!  I also like your choice of the DeSoto Hemi for the engine (I made the same choice in a chopped 3W Highboy Deuce I built a couple of years ago). 

The sprint steering box below the IP is a great detail, and the use of that old Monogram '32 Ford front axle is one I've used before too.  Wheel and tire choice are excellent as well.  Great result....

And terrific photography too!  Congrats...TIM

 

Thanks Tim. Photographing this thing was a bear because all the tones are so similar. And the interior seemed to come out as one big black hole. I had to draw on all my Photoshop bag 'o tricks to get the photos to look like the model. I landed up "pushing" the exposure on the interior to get the details to show and increasing the saturation to get enough contrast on the steel tones. But then the image was too blue and I had to mess with the color balance to get back to the effect I had created with the paints and metalizer. But somehow after all that the photos looks like the model.

The Big Hemi from the AMT '53 Ford pickup was all about making the car look beefy with lots of mass. I'm a fan of the Ohio Look deuces as exemplified by the cars coming out of the late Barry Lobeck's shop. The agressive bulk and in-the-weeds nose of his cars was an influence. The flatter stance and the bias-ply tires are a tip of the hat to The Rodder's Journal which obviously was the source of the original theme, the bare metal look.

Regarding the front axle, despite the sweet looking I-beam, I had always resisted using this setup because the back side of the shocks is flat. But at the end of the day the flat side is largely invisible and the axle has a nice drop and a straightforward shock arrangement. With the advent of Molotow there was simply no reason not to use it.

Thanks again for your comments. They are always greatly appreciated.

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    October, 2015
Posted by Tim Boyd on Tuesday, June 04, 2019 9:40 PM

Bernard....that one came out great!  I also like your choice of the DeSoto Hemi for the engine (I made the same choice in a chopped 3W Highboy Deuce I built a couple of years ago). 

The sprint steering box below the IP is a great detail, and the use of that old Monogram '32 Ford front axle is one I've used before too.  Wheel and tire choice are excellent as well.  Great result....

And terrific photography too!  Congrats...TIM

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Friday, May 31, 2019 6:30 PM

Thanks everyone! I accidently discovered this technique a few years ago when testing the metalizer powder over various finishes. It was being hyped as a chrome finish, something at which it fails miserably, at least as far as I could manage. But... by varying the brightness, texture and color of the underlying metallic paint, and how much and how you add and remove the black wash you can imitate anything from brushed or polished aluminum to old worn steel. It's definitely worth the time to fool round with it and come up with the look(s) that are appropriate to your project. In my case I was trying to reproduce the look of the steel tub on my frogeye Sprite when we were building it up from bare metal.

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Thursday, May 30, 2019 7:16 PM

Well done once again, Bernard! A real looker! Thumbs Up

chucky

  • Member since
    February, 2008
Posted by justmike on Thursday, May 30, 2019 11:56 AM

Nice!  You achieved a great look with that finish

Feelings are like scents: The more they are analyzed, the worse they smell.
  • Member since
    November, 2004
  • From: UK
Posted by PatrickW on Thursday, May 30, 2019 1:56 AM

Superb Bernard, you've done it again!

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Wednesday, May 29, 2019 5:50 PM

Here are the final presentation photos:






Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Tuesday, May 28, 2019 7:17 PM

Thank you all for the kind words!

This project is now completed. I’ll post the final presentation photos tomorrow but in the meantime here are some last construction notes and detail photos. The Revell Stacey David Rat Roster contributed most of the final detail bits, including the hairpins, chopped windshield, most of the steering bits in the front end (except, of course, for the bell crank and steering rod which I fabricated), headlights, and things like the rear view mirror and radiator cap. The taillights and license plate frame are from a Revell’32 Ford  Highboy Roadster, thinned down to look more to scale. Here’s a detail composite photo:



I’ve left some parts removable to present several variants. I made a small Moon tank from thecenter piece from an AMT ’49 Ford Moon tank and the two side plates from the Revell ’32 Ford 5—Window coupe Moon tank. Doing this eliminated the annoying horizontal seam of the Revel tank which results from the two piece center barrel. This allowed me to preserve the chrome, which I wanted to do in order to contrast with the bare metal grill and frame horns. Here are the 4 variants:



Next up the final “beauty” pictures. Thanks to all who followed along and for your comments.

Thanx for lookin’,
B.

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Sunday, May 26, 2019 6:52 PM

I continue to  be amazed by this build. Your photo and printing skills are first rate as well yielding a stunning array of pictures. It's been a pleasure watching this one come together. Thanks for the ride!  Thumbs Up

chucky

  • Member since
    November, 2013
Posted by Daddy_O on Sunday, May 26, 2019 8:42 AM
Fantastic work!
  • Member since
    May, 2019
Posted by graminger on Thursday, May 23, 2019 10:21 AM

That's a great looking finish Bernard, very original.

Mick..

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Wednesday, May 22, 2019 8:27 PM

As I was looking at my last post I was noticing that the body wasn’t set straight on the chassis. The driver’s side rear was skewed high. In addition I hadn’t set my camera to shoot RAW format and shot regular JPG format instead. RAW format is the basic data your digital camera generates before it compresses the color and pixel density information into a smaller file. Most cameras don’t offer you the option to save pictures in RAW format. It’s a feature mainly reserved for high-end professional and semi-pro cameras. But my cheap little Fujifilm ES900 9 megapixel compact camera will save to RAW, and the result is truer colors and sharper details. So, since the body was on crooked anyway, I decided to reshoot my last post with the body on straight and a  more faithful presentation of the bare steel effect. I also adjusted the white balance to represent the true white of the background I was using.

Here’s a comparison of the side view from the last post and the new image with the body on straight and the higher quality photography. The red circles highlight the effect of the crookedly mounted body.



And here’s the re-do of the last post.



And finally here are some additional details omitted from the last post. The undercarriage shot is only missing the front wishbones and steering tie rod. The interior shot shows the Schroeder sprint car steering underneath the cowl. And the two top photos show how the motor will look behind the grill with the carburetors in place. The top right photo is a little Photoshop-Phun with a ghost shot of the carbs showing through the hood panel.




Thanx for lookin’,
B.

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Tuesday, May 21, 2019 9:39 PM

Thanks Chucky!

The chassis work is now complete with the exception of the steering tie rod and hairpins. At last I could check the stance by temporarily attaching the wheels and tires. So below are 4 photos which amount to a stance check. I came out as I wanted, with that characteristic tough and slightly fat look of a classic highboy. I fabricated a steering pivot arm to connect to the largely hidden Schroeder sprint car steering (a lovely resin piece from the late Ron Royston at Early Years Resin).  The tie rod is done, fabricated from styrene rod and “plated” with Molotow, and the hairpins are the Revell Deuce ones from the 5-window coupe kit.

Lotsa fitting, fettling and adjustment right now, but it shouldn’t be long before this project is completed. I’ll include detail photos with my final update before completion. With only black to contrast with all the bare and plated metal tones it looks very monochromatic, which is what I like about the baremetal look.

Thanks for lookin’,
B.

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Thursday, May 16, 2019 7:23 PM

Wow! Looks like you nailed the bare metal look, Bernard! This one's going to be cool for sure. I'm watching!  Geeked

chucky

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Thursday, May 16, 2019 7:11 PM

Thanks for the nice comments, everyone.

I’m in the “bitsa” stage of this project. I’m doing some “bitsa” this and “bitsa” that, a natural outcome of my improvisational kit-bashing build style. I didn’t care for the thick look and stiffness of the interior panels so I landed up redoing them completely from .010” and .020” styrene sheet. The original was done from .030” styrene sheet as a base with .010 and .020 strip to construct the details. So the overall thickness is now about ½ of what it was. Because it’s so much thinner it’s flexible and rests snuggly up to the interior surface of the body. I also cut out the triangular areas so that the interior body surface is now revealed, creating a far better depth effect than before. I like it much better, now.

I also added a dash panel from an AMT Phantom Vicky kit. Both the new panels and the dash are shown as part of the composite summary photo below.

The rolling stock is now complete, too. The wheels are a combination of Halibrand mags, the fronts coming from an MPC funny car kit, and the rears are the front mags from the AMT Phantom Vicky kit. The wheel centers have been painted in Testors Acryl Jet Exhaust to simulate a Dow 7 coating. The rims were left in the kit chrome. The front tires are Modelhaus T110B’s and the rear tires are my favorite Old Skool hot rod rear tires, Herb Deeks bias ply truck tires.

Next up, the motor. As I mentioned I wanted a big, powerful looking motor, and considered several of the currently fashionable “alternative” Old Skool power plants, like the Buick Nailhead, or, as Tim suggested, a Ford Y-Block.  I gave a lot of thought to doing a blown Oldsmobile. But in the end I decided on the massive looking DeSoto Firedome from the AMT ’53 Ford Pickup Trophy Series kit. Those 8 Strombergs really command attention!

And lastly I’ve included a photo of the front and rear axles. The front is the dropped I-beam from the Revellogram 1/24th scale ’32 Ford Roadster kits. I shaved the spring to bring the front end further down. The spot brakes are from the AMT Phantom Vicky kit. The rear is a resin Halibrand quick change setup from parts stash. The rods you see protruding from the ’40 Ford brake backing plates are the mounting pins for the rear spring. They’ll be trimmed away to a shorter length once everything is assembled.

With the “bitsas” all cleared away it’s time for final assembly. The exhaust system and driveline will take some fiddling but it shouldn’t be too long before this project is completed.

Thanx for lookin’,
B.

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    March, 2017
  • From: Brighton England
Posted by Spencer Mopar Fan on Thursday, May 16, 2019 6:41 PM
Love it so far Bernard , as always your detailing is perfect! May I be so bold as to suggest something different in the engine bay , like a Stude , poncho or even *gasp* a JAG 6 ?? Still a 354 /331 would fit nice as well !
  • Member since
    October, 2015
Posted by Tim Boyd on Wednesday, May 08, 2019 7:49 AM

Bernard....glad to see you back at the altar of hot rod modeling!   The baremetal finish looks spectacular.  

Will be watching to see how it takes shape during the remainder of the build process.

As for the engine....not sure this is exactly in line with your current thinking...but how about a hotted-up Y-Block Ford? 

Best....TIM 

  • Member since
    November, 2013
Posted by Daddy_O on Tuesday, May 07, 2019 7:08 AM
Impressive!
  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Baremetal Deuce HiBoy Roadster - Completed with Final Photos
Posted by gbk1 on Wednesday, May 01, 2019 8:47 PM

I haven’t done a hot rod or drag car project since the Autorama contest on the TRaK board last December. This is quite a dry spell for me, but I’ve been working on several sports car projects since then, including a couple of Porsches. This project, however, has been percolating in my imagination for quite some time. It’s a ‘32 Ford roadster which will be done entirely in bare metal tones with the exception of the tires and any non-metal items like hoses and seating surfaces. The stance will be that of a “low Highboy”, with a Z’d rear end and severely dropped front axle, providing for a low overall ride height despite the body being mounted atop the frame rails. I’ve done the basic chassis work, based on a Revell Deuce chassis. I’m incorporating as many details that will emphasize the bare metal appearance as I can think of, so I grafted a ’37 Ford truck X-member to the Deuce rails. The rear end has a buggy spring from a Monogram ’27 Ford. The rear axle will feature a Halibrand quick change which will be visible from the back end because I won’t be extending the rear pan despite omitting the stock fuel tank.

The interior will be all bare metal except for the upholstery on the bomber-style seats which are resin pieces I got from Big Donkey Resins. The picture below shows a rough mockup of the interior bits. The interior side panels will be glued and clamped into place to conform to the body shape.



Below are some body photos showing the basic setup. All the metal finishes in the two phtos consist of Duplicolor Metallic Silver lacquer which was treated with Kosutte Gin San metalizer powder and a some thin black acrylic wash.



Still to be determined are some pretty major items, like the motor and rolling stock, but I wanted to get the basic look started in my belated re-entry to things of a hot rod nature. The motor will most likely be something big and powerful, not a flathead, and the motor will determine whether I include hood panels or not. The wheels will most likely be traditional Halibrands of some sort, with skinny big ‘n’ littles.

Thanx for lookin’,
B.

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

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