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32 Ford Lakes-style Coupe - TROG 2 - Completed with Final Photos

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  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
32 Ford Lakes-style Coupe - TROG 2 - Completed with Final Photos
Posted by gbk1 on Thursday, January 04, 2018 9:29 PM

This is my second project for the 2018 NNL West The Race of Gentlemen theme, my first having been a ’29 Ford roadster done as a pre-war style dry lakes car sponsored by Gilmore Oil. My original plan had been to do another pre-war car, a one-man dry lakes modified based on a narrowed Ala-Kart body shell. But after finishing TROG #1 I realized that this project was far too ambitious, having a heavy scratch building component, with a good chance I wouldn’t finish it in time for the show’s February 3rd deadline.

So I’ve chosen to go to the radical opposite, a simple curbside build based on a neat Jimmy Flintstone chopped ’32 Ford 3-window with lakes-style slanted A-pillar. It even has a rolled pan, so all I have to do is fabricate a belly pan, rig up a front and rear suspension arrangement, and I'm good to go. I’m planning on using red tinted windows. If they’re dark enough I may even forgo the interior, in which case it will be a slammer!

Here’s a composite picture from the Jimmy Flintstone web site showing the basic body shell and a really nice completed model whose builder, sadly, is uncredited. As you can see it comes with a bulging molded show car-style rear pan with molded in license plate frame. As you may know, Flintstone bodies are quite thick, so it was an easy session with my Dremel to grind it down to a smooth, trim competition style pan. Other than that the body came in fine shape and very little was required to prep it for paint.



A popular style at the TROG meets is one where an old competition or street rod has been refurbished to sound mechanical state, but the original “barn find” patina has been preserved. There’s a fine example that’s featured in this year’s NNL Poster (see: http://nnlwest.org/ ). That’s the idea behind my project. Paint is Krylon Blue Ocean Breeze, a real 50’s Packard Caribbean style light blue. It was applied over successive layers of red and white primer and then distressed by sanding through the color layers in the appropriate spots. I then made homemade decals using some Photoshop techniques so that the decals themselves are distressed. Then the whole thing was sealed with Dullcote and further aged using weathering powders. Here are the results:



The wheels and tires are next. I’ll be making scratch built flat aluminum discs, the precursors of the fancier domed spun aluminum Moon discs. That will be the subject of my next update. Other than that the rear suspension will be non-existent, hidden under the bellypan, and the front suspension is a basic dropped axle affair from my parts box. Even at a leisurely build pace it shouldn’t take long to do…

Thanx for lookin’,
B.

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Friday, January 05, 2018 1:53 PM

Awesome! I love the weathering! As is often heard, "less is more". Very cool! Cool

chucky

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Friday, January 05, 2018 3:44 PM

NICE.

This one will be great to follow also Thumbs Up.Keep it coming.

Love Velocity channel, Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I learn so much there.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    May, 2017
Posted by Tom Louis on Friday, January 05, 2018 6:27 PM

This is going to be a good one, I'm watching.

Thunderbass Shufflemaster

  • Member since
    November, 2017
Posted by Gluecipher on Friday, January 05, 2018 6:46 PM

Aint that nice,man.

Its weird that i would pretty much never paint any real car in any kind of blue but all these burnt and worn light blue model cars tend to please my eye.

I can but wonder what kind of awesome ride you could pull out if you were to build lets say an old Gulf sponsored mk1 Ford Escort or Mustang  in barn find theme...

 

  • Member since
    March, 2017
  • From: Brighton England
Posted by Spencer Mopar Fan on Saturday, January 06, 2018 8:13 AM
As always Bernard , a beauty ! ( The car , not you LOL ) Looking forward to the "moon discs" , I have 1:8th ones for the Big T kit - one of them now has the 'double O eyes logo' behind my collection of 1:64 hotwheels & M2 mooneyes cars ( look out for the '68 s/s Cuda.. PHOAR !) but I want to make my own discs ( 1:24/5 & 1:64..... !) I love the weathered paint on this deuce .
  • Member since
    September, 2007
  • From: Melbourne, Fl.
Posted by rickr442 on Sunday, January 07, 2018 2:06 AM

Very cool! I used to contribute to a model column to Rod & Custom magazine, and I really wish this style of hot rod had been dreamed up back then. Congrats on a great piece of work.

www.fueledbythefallen.com

'Peggy, call the insurance agent... The cars got some bullet holes!'..... Joe Mannix

Yeah, but half an inch to the right, he woulda missed me altogether!'.....Jim Rockford

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Sunday, January 07, 2018 3:06 PM

Thanks everyone.

“Realism” had always been something that motivated me in my modeling. But realism is a pretty slippery concept. For different viewers, and even the same viewer in different circumstances, what looks "real" vary widely. For example, ultra-detailed models full of tiny, expertly applied parts to many will look “realistic” because the expectation is to see all these superbly rendered parts just as we would see them in the real world if we chose to look at something with care and in detail. For other viewers the same model might look busy and over detailed – some might say “toy like”. A great ultra-detailed model often “picks its battles”, as I like to say – the modeler includes the extra detail where it would be observed in the real world, and perhaps omits detail where it would get in the way. Most of the super-detail modeling I admire has this characteristic. But I also enjoy more impressionistic modeling, where colors and textures and subtle scaling effects are what render realistic impact to the completed model.

With so little to it - no interior, motor or chassis detail to speak of -this project I hope will fall in the impressionistic category. It’s all color, texture, rolling stock and bodywork. To me that’s the appeal of the curbside/slammer approach.

The wheels and tires are done now. The rear tires are Herb Deeks truck tires. I buy a stash every year from Herb at the NNL West. They're large enough in diameter to lend themselves to setting up a set of big ‘n’ littles. They are my current go-to for early era hot rods where narrow bias plys are the order of the day. The front tires are from the Revellogram ’37 Ford pickup and delivery kits. If you find an early enough issue they’re even branded Goodyear! They have a nice ribbed tread and pie-crust markings and pair up well with the Deeks tires.

Both types of tires are 1/24 and require the slightly larger diameter 1/24 wheels generally found in Monogram models and in the sports car modeling aftermarket.  For this application the actual appearance of the wheels was completely irrelevant. In fact the funkier and more useless the wheel the better, since it would be totally hidden by the wheels covers. Searching through my stash I happened on a set of – to my eyes – ghastly 90’s billet styles wheels in a Monogram ’37 Ford Sedan kit. Yechhh!!! They would do nicely...

I stripped them of their chrome. Ironically the narrower front set worked best at the rear, where they were paired with a pair of the wheels backs from the aforementioned Revellogram ’37 Ford pickup/van kits; this time reversed which supplied a handy mounting for the rear axle. The wider rear wheels took up the entire width of the skinny front tires, perfect, because all I needed to do was mount the inner front wheel covers to the flush wheel surface.

I used a circle cutting tool designed for cutting paper and thin plastic and cut 6 .66” diameter flat discs from .020” styrene. The discs were painted in Testors Aluminum Plate, allowed to cure thoroughly and buffed out.  Then the discs were weathered to go with the bodywork. I’ve found that applying Kosutte Gin San metalizing powder to Testors Metalizer Aluminum Plate makes for a very convincing worn polished aluminum finish. This was followed by a light application of the same weathering powders as I had used on the bodywork. The result is a hopefully “beach racing”-appropriate weathered finish.

Below is a composite picture of the process. Now for the bellypan panel, a blanking piece for the non-interior, the “suspension” and the red-tinted window glass…

Thanx for lookin’,
B.

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    March, 2017
  • From: Brighton England
Posted by Spencer Mopar Fan on Sunday, January 07, 2018 9:55 PM
I don't think I'll try doing the 1:64 wheel covers that way then eh ?? LOL ...... Thumb Tacks ! - I'll try them !
  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Tuesday, January 09, 2018 2:35 PM

Just about done, which shouldn’t be surprising given overall there wasn’t a lot to do. The front and rear suspension is installed and so it was time for a stance check. Things look like they turned out OK, with a racy rake to go with the lakes-style angled A-pillar, emphasized by the weathered molding on the body. The wheel covers were re-done to match the bellypan (see below) – I felt the first attempt was too bright to go with overall worn look.



The red tinted windows have been installed:



As I suspected the small window openings combined with the relatively dark plexiglas, completely obscures the interior, so the model is now a full slammer with absolutely no inside detail whatsoever. I made a blanking sheet to seal off the interior below the beltline, avoiding any possibility of seeing the rough resin and crude structure. It’s a sheet of styrene painted flat black and taped in place. The bellypan was fabricated from .020 styrene and finished in Duplicolor Silver metallic lacquer. Treated with Kosutte Gin Sang metalizing powder it looks like bare metal steel. Followed up with some weathering powders to match the body work and it all tied together well. At this point I re-did the wheel covers with the same treatment to match. The bellypan will be fastened in place using the L-shaped tabs on the reverse side as glue points. The T-shaped strip down the middle of the reverse side is to give the thin .020 styrene some structure. The notch is to clear the rear "axle".

In the composite photo below, besides the shots of the bellypan construction and placement and the interior view showing the sophisticated rear suspension system and the blanking sheet, I’ve included a detail shot of the front axle installation. I actually went to the trouble of fabricating a leaf spring from strips of .020 styrene, but on completion it turned out that the width of the spring was exactly the width of the slot in the bodywork to accommodate it, so it is totally invisible on the completed car. Oh well...

All that’s left to do now is to fabricate the steering and suspension detail. The rear shocks will be nonexistent since they are hidden in the bodywork, the front shocks being Revell ’40 Ford Standard vane-type units. The radius rods will be split from those found in the Revell ’37 Ford truck and van kits. The steering will have a side mounted bell-crank and external tie rod. With that it should be done!

Thanx for lookin’,
B.

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    November, 2017
Posted by Gluecipher on Wednesday, January 10, 2018 12:24 AM

How long do you think it will take, before your mind starts to think about installing "just a minor detail" here and there...eventually leading to building an engine,whole frame and interior Wink

 

Its kinda positively annoying to see how great curbside ( i think thats what this model style is called,without interior,motor etc ?) model one can build, when im trying to build detailed stuff the best i can but i keep thinking mine is more like curbside...especially when i see stuff like you just builtYes

If i were to make a display for your model, i'dd have it standing on "salt lake" with tiny puddle of oil under the car, and a broken piston rod behind the tail.

  • Member since
    March, 2017
  • From: Brighton England
Posted by Spencer Mopar Fan on Wednesday, January 10, 2018 9:22 PM
Love the detailing on the paint Bernard . I have a simple diorama idea for you . I used an old broken polystyrene ceiling tile ( I kept the straight edge for a rear print of "the mountain range")which has a mottled effect just like the salt and its relatively to scale . Works well with 1:64 too !
  • Member since
    November, 2017
Posted by Gluecipher on Thursday, January 11, 2018 3:27 AM

Its nice to read all those weathering products mentioned, as it helps me to pick a few. Yes

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Friday, January 12, 2018 3:37 PM

All Done! Here are the final photos.

Thanx to all who followed along,
B.





Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Friday, January 12, 2018 7:13 PM

Magnificent in its beautifully executed simplicity! Thumbs Up

chucky

  • Member since
    November, 2017
Posted by Gluecipher on Sunday, January 14, 2018 8:30 AM

I really like it...somehow you captured the motion in it as the body seems to be on the move in my eyesYes

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Monday, January 15, 2018 11:45 AM

Thank you guys. "Slammer" projects are ideal for focusing in on the total look you're going after without getting too sidetracked by fine detail. On the other hand, that's what makes them so challenging, since in a way your out there without a net: there's virtually nothing to fall back on except the total impression the completed model conveys. It either works or it doesn't... There is no possibility of extra points being given for effort (or detail, or complexity, etc.), LOL! So I'm glad my model could make an impression... Thanx again!

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Monday, January 15, 2018 12:09 PM

Well Bernard, another fine project completed Thumbs Up

I like your thoughts on the "Slammer" idea and totally agree.

As you said the focus becomes the appearance and all the work that went into it rather than all the other details we have to focus on and others look for, sometimes missing out on the over-all look that in this case your trying to emphacise.

Great job, and I wish you luck and tons of fun in SoCal Thumbs Up.

 

Love Velocity channel, Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I learn so much there.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by RudyOnWheels on Monday, January 15, 2018 1:30 PM
Super cool! I dunno why i'd never thought of doing a curbside Hot Rod before..... Great Job, especially the weathering techniques! - Rudy
  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 12:13 PM

Thanks Dave and Rudy.

Rudy, quite often hot rods are open cars and frequently have exposed engines - at that point a curbside is virtually impossible, so I think the idea of doing one that way doesn't offer itself to us much.

Dave. thanks as always. Many of your models look so strong "buttoned up" that they function most effectively as "virtual slammers", and I mean that in only the most complementary way!

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Ohio
Posted by HineMotors on Friday, February 23, 2018 8:47 PM
Outstanding!!! the weathering is perfect and overall really captures the era.

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