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1969 Barracuda Pro Touring

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  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
1969 Barracuda Pro Touring
Posted by chucky on Thursday, January 23, 2014 8:13 PM

I started this one last winter along with the '68 Dart 270 that I posted last month. I began with the AMT '69 Barracuda from the triple musclecar "Super Set". I combined it with the mechanicals from the Revell 2009 Challenger SRT8 with the body and interior from the '69 Cuda. I wanted to retain as much of the Cuda flavor as possible so I kept the interior as stock as possible to include the unique fold-down rear seat. I adapted the Challenger shifter and quadrant to the Cuda center console. I added a tilt column with paddle shifters with the stock rallye dash. I built a roll cage which still allows access to the rear seat and replaced the front seats with Recaro-type seats from the parts box to which I added the upholstery from the stock Cuda seats. The Challenger floor pan, driveshaft and exhaust system is shortened to fit the Cuda body. I had to widen the fenders and quarter panels substantially to fit the wheels from the Challenger. The intent was to create  a pro-touring type car with as much of the '69 Cuda look as possible but with the late model 425hp Hemi and four wheel independent suspension. The paint is Testors German Silver Metallic enamel with Testors enamel clear coat. Thanks for looking. Comments and questions are welcomed, as usual. 

chucky

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Thursday, January 23, 2014 8:16 PM

Here are a few more pics

chucky

  • Member since
    June, 2013
Posted by bondo bill on Thursday, January 23, 2014 9:58 PM

kool build

  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: sunny Sydney, Australia
Posted by nottheband on Thursday, January 23, 2014 10:35 PM

Impressed with what you have done here, your planning and execution are spot on, and the colour suits it to a tee.  Cheers

Steve

  • Member since
    March, 2011
  • From: South Central Pa.
Posted by CarGuy1963 on Thursday, January 23, 2014 10:43 PM

Very sharp Pro Tourer you got there Chucky! Excellent bashing and modding! I really like the widened fenders and hood treament. Very well done sir!

Its only plastic until you add imagination! CG63.

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Friday, January 24, 2014 10:42 PM

Thanks, Bill, Steve and Michael! I appreciate your comments. It turned out to be much more of a challenge than I initially figured. In addition to the obvious, I had to do major surgery to the front strut towers and wheelhouses, and had to modify the hood twice to get clearance for the intake manifold and had to scratch an air filter to squeeze into what little space was left. Ironically, a Revell '69 Charger (the one with the less than perfect body dimensions) donated its fenders and quarter panels which were "bulged" into place and the gaps filled with strip styrene.(The Cuda was looking more like a NASCAR modified after I cut the wheel openings large enough to fit the '09 Challenger wheels/tires.) Amazingly, the shape of the wheel openings on the Cuda and Charger were nearly identical. I'll have to get some outdoor photos when the deep freeze lets up: the build is much cleaner than it appears in the photos above.

chucky

  • Member since
    August, 2013
  • From: West Seneca, NY (Buffalo)
Posted by Snork56 on Friday, January 24, 2014 11:18 PM

Oh Chucky....  I'm gonna like this!!!  Got my evil eye on it!

To get back up when you are down, fight when you are struggling, give the extra effort when you are in pain, come back when no one expects you to and stand up tall when people try to pull you down.    That is what makes up a true champion!!   Snork56 (S56) Henry D.  

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Friday, January 24, 2014 11:35 PM

Thanks, Henry! I've got plenty of in-progress photos in case anyone has a question on how something was accomplished. As with the '68 Dart Street Racer, I held off on posting the build until after completion so as not to drag the WIP out for a year or more since build time is sporadic around here. Laugh

chucky

  • Member since
    August, 2013
  • From: West Seneca, NY (Buffalo)
Posted by Snork56 on Saturday, January 25, 2014 6:03 PM

I'd like to give the Dart a look

To get back up when you are down, fight when you are struggling, give the extra effort when you are in pain, come back when no one expects you to and stand up tall when people try to pull you down.    That is what makes up a true champion!!   Snork56 (S56) Henry D.  

  • Member since
    August, 2013
  • From: West Seneca, NY (Buffalo)
Posted by Snork56 on Saturday, January 25, 2014 6:15 PM

Hey!  I just came back after looking at your Dart.....  Simply amazing!  Plain looking build with alot going on that doesn't pop out at you!  Everything is just right!  I like the way you dirtied up the driveline and the body..  The interior is a color that's just not seen, and where did you get that idea for the exterior color???  Man, It's ugly but it fits the rest of the car!  Liked how you carved up the chassis!  I don't know how I missed it!   Great build!  Thumbs up!

To get back up when you are down, fight when you are struggling, give the extra effort when you are in pain, come back when no one expects you to and stand up tall when people try to pull you down.    That is what makes up a true champion!!   Snork56 (S56) Henry D.  

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Saturday, January 25, 2014 9:20 PM

Thanks, Henry. I flattened the hood and scratched the body side moldings, bench seat and steering column with automatic shift lever and quadrant. I was going for a "used" look on the paint on the Dart. In fact, I originally was going to go with peeling paint on the horizontal surfaces, since Chrysler (and Ford, too) had some problems with adhesion of the light blue metallic paint in that time period. (My 1:1 '69 Valiant was a prime example before I stripped it and repainted it black.) I changed my mind, however, as I thought it would be a little more exposed gray and red primer than I would have driven around with on my own car. I did "rub through" some highlighted areas slightly to replicate a paint job that had been compounded once too often, although it doesn't really show in the photos. The interior color combo is what my 1:1 Valiant had and also was found several times in my research.(If you Google 1968 Dodge Dart interior image you'll see what I mean.) You have to keep in mind the thought process of the person who would have originally bought a conservatively-optioned bench seat Dart for a family car in 1968. If you think the paint on the Dart is ugly, just wait 'til you see the paint on my next build! Laugh

chucky

  • Member since
    August, 2013
  • From: West Seneca, NY (Buffalo)
Posted by Snork56 on Wednesday, January 29, 2014 11:07 PM

It's simply wild Chucky.. And you do realize that I mean "ugly" in a nice way!  It's "ugly" -> Hot!...  I see now that you were trying to replicate the look of the Plymouth Valiant "Pi**ed Off" (* = s) Coupe that has been popping with that killer late Hemi on the net.......  You may not realize it, but I think you're the first to get that look in scale !!!  Congrats!

And now you have me guessing what the next "look" will be, that you are threatening!  My Best to you....

To get back up when you are down, fight when you are struggling, give the extra effort when you are in pain, come back when no one expects you to and stand up tall when people try to pull you down.    That is what makes up a true champion!!   Snork56 (S56) Henry D.  

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Wednesday, January 29, 2014 11:37 PM

Thanks, Henry. I'm not familiar with that particular Valiant. I'll have to check it out. As for the next "look", the body and interior mods are underway, and I think the subject may turn out to be as much a surprise as the paint job. Time will tell. (A long time, if my past builds are any indication.) Laugh

chucky

  • Member since
    March, 2010
Posted by 70CudaTJ on Thursday, January 30, 2014 2:41 AM

Very cool Chucky, you don't see enough of these built up and not like this either. Love the updated Hemi too Thumbs Up Thumbs Up Thumbs Up

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Thursday, January 30, 2014 10:25 PM

Thank you, Tim! It's taken me a while to get into the "computer cars" in the 1:1 Mopar world, but there are so many cool Chargers, Challengers and Magnums in our local Mopar club that I can't help but respect the performance all around. I wanted to merge the late drivetrain with as much of the '69 Cuda body and interior as possible. This thing would be a beast in 1:1 without the excess weight of air bags, power windows, seats, etc. of the late model cars and reasonable fuel economy, too.

chucky

  • Member since
    February, 2012
  • From: Central/Eastern Europe
Posted by felhasznaaloo on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 9:41 AM

Man, this car IS wild. The photos taken from up top show how much 'muscle' got added with those Charger fenders. I just checked out the '68 Dart Street Racer you built, and can't decide which one is cooler...

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 11:45 AM

Hey Chucky Big Smile

I love subtle builds like this Thumbs Up.

Makes us all look real close and pay attention to your description of all that you did, so we don't miss anything.

Every aspect is so well done, from the excellent body work, to the very nicely done paint and detailing. Love the subtle reverse hood scoop. It's ALMOST invisible Cool.

Ya gotta be proud of this one - Dave

 

 

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 9:45 PM

Thanks, felhasznaaloo! I had fun with both builds. The widened fenders/quarters were a necessity and initially presented a challenge, but figuring that out is part of the satisfaction. As I mentioned, the Cuda was my first venture into late model cars as well as my first attempt at Pro Touring. The Dart is more in my comfort zone: I love street sleepers (in fact, another one is in the pipeline).

chucky

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 10:04 PM

Thank you, Dave! I tried to keep the body modifications to a minimum with changes made only where clearance was an issue. The hood scoop is actually the second one I scratched: the first one fit the intake manifold OK but would not clear the throttle body or air filter ducting. The present scoop just barely clears (as long as I use the scratched air cleaner) but blends nicely into the slightly modified header panel. Not obvious in the photos, I have three gauge faces mounted to the rear-facing portion of the scoop which is blacked out. I appreciate that you read the descriptions. Since my builds don't seem to progress quickly, this presentation doesn't involve a long term WIP but I have plenty of photos to help answer any questions that may arise.

chucky

  • Member since
    December, 2004
  • From: Indiana
Posted by wabatuckeun on Wednesday, February 05, 2014 3:10 PM

Nice job chucky! I like it, it looks AWESOME!!! I did something similar a while back for someone on another board. Iused a 67 Coronet, 09 Challenger drive train and a 66 Charger interior. He called it a "Charnet". Great build! You are very talented!!
StaceCool

On the 8th day God created the HEMI and all the Bosses and Rats ran away!!!!
  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Wednesday, February 05, 2014 8:03 PM

Thanks, Stace! It's something different for me. It was a challenge (no pun intended) to stuff all those mechanicals under that short wheelbase. The height and width of the tires was the biggest obstacle. I like the trend of 1:1 pro-touring cars. I still like the pro-street cars, but in reality the new generation of pro-touring is better suited to our crowded roads and the improved drivability and fuel economy doubtless make them more pleasant to drive. Either way, horsepower rules!

chucky

  • Member since
    August, 2010
  • From: Ct.
Posted by cadillac on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 9:39 PM

WOW! Very Cool.

I'm a bad monkey.

Aaaaaaaahhhhh insanity, It's not just for the insane anymore.

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 10:04 PM

Thanks, Cadillac! I appreciate your interest.

chucky

  • Member since
    December, 2005
  • From: Tennessee
Posted by SLUSHER on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 1:51 AM

Sweet custom build Chucky. Your build looks like a real life Hotrod cover car. Amazing work on this one bro........................Slusher

IT TAKES A LIVING SAVIOR TO SAVE A DYING WORLD....

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 10:11 PM

Thank you, Carl. That's quite a compliment. I'm glad you like it and can appreciate all that went into it. I'm still waiting for a chance to take some outdoor photos.

chucky

  • Member since
    February, 2014
  • From: The Grim and Frostbitten North
Posted by funeralxempire on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 10:41 PM

Aren't they sort of intended for different purposes? Pro-Street being drag racing influenced with Pro-Touring being more influenced by racing done by touring cars and GT cars on road courses?

Regardless, I love the idea of classic cars being upgraded to keep up with modern ones. I'd love to apply this concept to an old Hakosuka or Kenmeri Skyline and make a mean classic Datsun.

Lastly, this turned out really impressive. I'm sort of intimidated looking at the great builds on here, I don't want to butcher my IROC too badly.

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Thursday, February 13, 2014 9:16 PM

Thanks for your comments, funeralxempire. Don't be intimidated: be inspired! Many of us here started building models fifty years ago or more and have learned along the way. Take advantage of the help and information that is available here and don't underestimate your capabilities. As has been said before, this isn't brain surgery: it's only plastic. Naturally, you don't want to toast a rare kit, but be adventurous with kits that are readily available so if you mess one up beyond repair, you can start again with another kit. Pro Street and Pro Touring are two different breeds, for sure. Pro Street still has its appeal, but as with many automotive "fads", its popularity in the 1:1 world is diminishing due to the realities of today. Pro Touring cars are better handling, more fuel-efficient (on a per/horsepower  basis). That doesn't mean that Pro Street doesn't still have a strong following. Perhaps the biggest difference is that a large number of the eighties-style Pro Street cars were more show cars than real street competitors. While there are a number of Pro Touring cars that are certainly show-worthy, most are meant to be driven. As far as the Asian upgrades, there are kits available to put American V8 power into the Nissan 240 and Mazda Miata as well as earlier kits to put small block Chevy power into Nissan 240Z cars. No doubt there are others. Many of those conversions are very impressive performers.

chucky

  • Member since
    February, 2014
  • From: The Grim and Frostbitten North
Posted by funeralxempire on Thursday, February 13, 2014 9:47 PM

When I say intimidated it's not quite the right word. Intimispired maybe? Haha.

Basically, the standard of quality is high so I feel I'll need to do my very best to have something worthy of sharing. You're right about the information here and I do intend on making the most of this resource.

>

Pro-Touring has big appeal to me because I have a hard time calling something a race car when it can't corner well. I've noticed from reading the PT forums that the same 'show car' vs. 'go car' is starting to happen in the PT scene which is disappointing but nearly impossible to avoid. Every type of modified car eventually has a sub-set that focuses on the appearance more than performance unless appearance was all that mattered in that scene to begin with.

>

I know of kits to drop American V8s into classic Japanese cars but what I had in mind was something less blasphemous; swapping the old L engine from the Nissan Fairlady or Skyline for a newer RB engine from a newer Skyline. Like how you dropped a new Hemi into a classic MOPAR.

>

I love engine swaps, especially mutant ones but sometimes it's nice to keep the I6 or V8 sound you expect from the car even if you've gained a modern engine. Since RBs and JZs make comparable power and torque to the V8s they strike me as a better option.... so long as the kit that donates the engine is cheap.

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