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'27 T Lo-Boy - Completed with final photos.

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  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
'27 T Lo-Boy - Completed with final photos.
Posted by gbk1 on Saturday, April 14, 2012 2:12 PM

I'm building this for a hot rod build-off on another board.  They do a lot of show rods so a Flintstone 27 T body with Revell Parts Pack Caddy mill and mostly Revell 29 RPU suspension, a Lo-boy stance, Testors Inca Gold paint, pearl white frame and interior, and lotsa chrome seemed appropriate given my building style.

The key influences for the image in my head are the Gary Heliker 26 T (which gained infamy in the movie Hot Rods To Hell), and the Ray Anderegg 25 T in the later “Golden Chariot” version recently cloned by Von Franco and featured as a TRJ cover car.

The Gary Heliker T:

The later Hot Rods To Hell Version:

The Von Franco Golden Chariot clone as featured in The Rodder’s Journal:

I've been wanting to do this project for a long time but have continually put it off because of the large amount of scratch building involved. But I think I may be up to it, now.

I scratched together the chassis after having built the mill to get the dimensions I needed. The air cleaner is from Modelhaus.



And here's a mockup for stance check, held together by rubber cement... The rear wheels are the ones I'll be using (from Modelhaus). The fronts will be chrome ones like the ones you see. The tires will be either these or slightly wider ones. Alternate tires and the chrome front wheels are on order from Modelhaus so that will probably be the long pole in the tent... Chopped Revell Deuce grill shell. I'm pretty sure I'll be running lakes pipes under the body to add some interest to the lower edge of the car. I'll probably have to make them.




The really big challenge is now, and has always been, scratching together an interior. Probably no way to avoid it any longer...

Thanx for lookin',
B.

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    September, 2011
Posted by Deathgoblin on Saturday, April 14, 2012 3:14 PM

Looking good!!  I really like this one.  :)  So is the whole car going to be the gold of the air cleaner?

  • Member since
    February, 2010
Posted by ace-garageguy on Saturday, April 14, 2012 5:57 PM

Nice work, especially that frame.

Plan your work, work your plan.

Measure twice, post once.

  • Member since
    May, 2011
  • From: Australia
Posted by IMPALA SS 427 on Saturday, April 14, 2012 6:47 PM

That frame looks sweet, excellent progress so far...

Currently working on: DUEL Plymouth valiant, 1958 Biscayne 4 door RHD.

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Saturday, April 14, 2012 7:01 PM

Thanx guys. I do these mockups and stance checks at the beginning to make sure things look right and will go together properly. Looking at the car in photos and also "in the plastic", there was something that bothered me. It looked a little stretched out. I decided it was because the rear wheels were a little too far out at the corners, so I moved the rear axle in about 1/8 inch or roughly 3 1/8 scale inches. This tucks the top of the rear tire below the trunk line creating a symmetry between them, and makes the car slightly more close coupled without spoiling the Lo-Boy effect. Belows is a comparison between the two with new stance at the bottom. The camera angle isn't a perfect match but I think it shows the difference.

The air cleaner is Testors Inca Gold, the color I'll paint the body. The frame rails and the interior upholstery will be pearl white.

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    February, 2010
Posted by ace-garageguy on Saturday, April 14, 2012 7:40 PM

Definitely an improvement. Since you brought it up, personally, I would prefer to see the front axle moved back a tad as well, maybe to where the tire tread just lined up with the rear face of the grille shell. It's very hard to tell exactly in your reference photos, but my eye seems to be telling me the front could come back......maybe not as much as I've suggested....and the balance might be a little more pleasing.

What is the scale wheelbase as she sits now?

For a '32 with the rear axle in the original location relative to the body, I've found 114" is about as long as you can go without looking like a Dachshund.

Plan your work, work your plan.

Measure twice, post once.

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Saturday, April 14, 2012 8:23 PM

The wheelbase is 4.5" = 112.5 scale inches, so under your Deuce rule of thumb. Regarding the front end, the front axle just clears the front crossmember right now so there is little room to take the front axle back without cutting up the frame. Also, I'm planning to run a fan on the motor (chromed, of course) so I have to allow for some space there. Once the motor placement is fully nailed down, including the fan and firewall clearances, that will determine the final placement of the grill shell. It most likely will move forward a bit which will change the look of the front end somewhat. And finally, I think that adding color, headlights, shocks, etc, will help fill the expanse at the nose.

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    August, 2009
Posted by Spex84 on Saturday, April 14, 2012 10:43 PM

This is rad. Looking forward to seeing the rest of the build!

  • Member since
    November, 2011
Posted by Tony Ds garage on Saturday, April 14, 2012 11:16 PM

what kit is the caddy air cleaner from?

 

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Sunday, April 15, 2012 9:45 AM

The air cleaner is the 1953 Cadillac air cleaner from The Modelhaus. ( http://www.modelhaus.com/index.php?y=&c=&pt=18&part=1&Submit=Search ) It can be found under Parts - Customizing Parts on Page 1. It's also available in a chromed version. 

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    June, 2009
Posted by lazyman on Sunday, April 15, 2012 12:11 PM

     Just a suggestion,,,I'd drop the mill down low between the frame rails,looks a bit high.

Lazyman, AKA Thread Killer

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Tuesday, April 17, 2012 4:41 PM

Thanx again guys!

I’ve received several comments regarding the stance of this car and decided to revisit it one more time to dial things in to address what I thought were some perceptive and constructive observations. The result was that I did an extensive re-do of several areas.

To begin with, I noticed that the  rear axle interfered with the lower edge of the body, causing the body shell to be jacked up and spoiling the original channel I had done. Removing some additional bodywork to clear the rear axle corrected this problem.

Next up was that I noticed that the front end was extremely low, creating a more extreme rake than I wanted and causing the front end to look more stretched out than was desirable. By lowering the suicide perch I raised the front end about 1/16” or about 1.5 scale inches.

Lastly, the motor sat too high relative to the bodywork, a problem made even worse once I corrected the rear axle interference. I made several changes to address this, the goal being to place the upper edge of the oil pan at the same level as the tops of the frame rails.. First of all I changed the transmission from the very large automatic transmission that comes with the Parts Pack Cadillac to a compact little La Salle box which lowered the back end of the motor without having to rebuild the center crossmember. Next I fabricated new  engine mounts that were slightly narrower and extended horizontally from the frame rails to support the engine at the center of the block casting rather than at the lower edge of the crankcase. With the engine lowered relative to the cowl top I found it necessary to raise the air cleaner slightly so I fabricated a small spacer placed between the air cleaner and the carburetor.

With all these changes it was necessary to finalize the motor location in order to dial in the grill shell placement, a design element which is critical to determining if the front end would appear too stretched out. This required fabricating the firewall, which I made from an AMT ’29 Ford roadster unit. In addition I installed the motor’s chromed fan. And finally, because it effects where the eye is drawn in evaluating the overall stance, I mocked up a windshield frame resembling the unit on the Anderegg car.

One more change still needs to be made. With the body properly located now, the grill shell will need to be cut down some more to align properly with the cowl.

All this work really has made a big difference. The car sits more solidly on its wheels and looks more put together than it did. So , thanks to those who were interested enough to comment.

Thanx for lookin’
B.




Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    February, 2010
Posted by ace-garageguy on Tuesday, April 17, 2012 5:17 PM

YES, YES, YES !! Now that is one mean looking little T.  Exceptionally nice rework.

Plan your work, work your plan.

Measure twice, post once.

  • Member since
    February, 2010
Posted by ace-garageguy on Tuesday, April 17, 2012 5:33 PM

You're going to hate me, but I'm really trying to be helpful....this looks SO good now, there's one tiny little thing you might consider adjusting, and that would be a very slight rework of your engine mounts to get the valve cover parallel to the frame rail. It's a small thing, but the rest of your proportions are so nice, I think that little adjustment would make it 100% perfection.

If this were a 1:1 build, the adjustment would also help to lower the tunnel a bit, and improve the angles on the driveshaft universal joints.

Plan your work, work your plan.

Measure twice, post once.

  • Member since
    March, 2007
  • From: SOUTH FLORIDUH
Posted by MikeMc on Tuesday, April 17, 2012 5:39 PM

ace-garageguy

You're going to hate me, but I'm really trying to be helpful....this looks SO good now, there's one tiny little thing you might consider adjusting, and that would be a very slight rework of your engine mounts to get the valve cover parallel to the frame rail. It's a small thing, but the rest of your proportions are so nice, I think that little adjustment would make it 100% perfection.

If this were a 1:1 build, the adjustment would also help to lower the tunnel a bit, and improve the angles on the driveshaft universal joints.

I agree with the Ace...It will make it a lot easier for the headers...Looking like another HOME RUN  Bernard!!!

HANG UP AND DRIVE........ Mike

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Friday, April 20, 2012 4:49 AM

Thanx for the comments. I’ve made a small modification to the engine mounts so that the motor now sits with the valve covers parallel with the frame rails and the top of the oil pan just about even with the top of the frame.

This update is Part One of the interior fabrication. One of the challenges one faces when working from a resin body for which there is no equivalent kit is that a large part of the build must be made from scratch. I find the process is often part logic and tactics and part accident and discovery. This is an excellent example of what I mean.

To start with I made an interior structure by tracing a pattern directly from the inside surfaces of the body to paper. Then I copied the pattern to a sheet of .010” styrene and cut it out. This would form the base for the actual surfaces you would see. Here is the pattern displayed flat and then installed in the body. It’s held in place using rubber cement.

Then I fabricated the “upholstered” surfaces using Evergreen Novelty sheet styrene in a siding pattern for the main surfaces and styrene half-round rod to make the bolster that will run around the outer edge of the body. The bolster was built up from .1875” stock and .080” stock glued together to form a “P” shape. The pieces were based on the original pattern I made and trial fit and trimmed using rubber cement before being permanently glued to the base using liquid cement. Here are the pieces that resulted. As you can see the base has broken apart from handling. The .010” styrene sheet becomes quite brittle and fractures and tears easily. However, I didn’t want to use anything thicker to minimize fitment issues. (The photo is out of sequence as will be explained below.)

Once the upholstered surfaces were finalized and glued in place to the base I clamped them in place and left them for a time in order for the plastic to gain some memory and conform to the compound curves of the interior. That explains the curved ends in the photo above. I discovered that once the interior tore apart installation of the interior pieces became much easier with no sacrifice of accuracy of fit.

And finally, here is the completed interior as it stands up to this point. You’ll note the small half-round .080” strips sticking out on the ends at the back. These will be bent home and glue in place to form a continuous strip and the seams and gaps filled and sanded to final shapes. Tactically this means the interior will have to be glued into the body before painting and the body masked and the interior painted but I can’t think of a way to avoid this.

It should be obvious that my build style is pretty improvisational, with some advanced planning but a lot of “on the fly engineering”. I haven’t decided whether to make a bench seat or use buckets. The inspiration cars both have bench seats. I’ll probably try both before deciding. A floor needs to be fabricated and a dashboard made. About the only thing I’ve decided on in advance is to use a ’60 Chevy Impala steering wheel from Modelhaus which will influence my design decisions.

Thanx for lookin’,
B.

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    September, 2010
  • From: NW Phoenix
Posted by gasser59 on Friday, April 20, 2012 7:30 AM

This is a really nice build so far and all of the revisions have improved the whole look and feel of the car. I agree on getting the valve covers parallel to the frame rails. Your imagination is dialed in on this one Bernard. Lovin' this.

gasser59

On the bench - '41 Willys pickup gasser & Dodge L-700 ramp truck.

  • Member since
    April, 2012
Posted by MkStudioArt on Tuesday, April 24, 2012 8:05 PM

Nice work your ...

Mounted at the end of last year, with that body ...

other photos ...

http://mkstudioart.com/studio/fotos/projetos/ford-t-roadster-1927/

 

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Wednesday, April 25, 2012 3:47 PM

Thanx guys! Smile

MKS, I dig the radical simplicity of your version and how the w.i.p. pictures on your website demonstrate the process by which you got there.

This is a small update which actually represents a fair amount of work. The body is narrow enough that using bucket seats proved impractical. In order to build out a bench seat I needed to finalize the floor of the car, The floor, in turn, needed to take into account the transmission and drive train to the degree to which it intruded into the cab. In a car this small everything is tightly interrelated.

The floor was fabricated from styrene sheet, rod, and strip with a low transmission tunnel which doubles as a support for the bench seat. The “upholstery” for the seat bottom was made from the same half round rod and siding patterned styrene sheet as the sides and back.

Below is a composite picture showing the interior and floor from various angles. It’s all in raw plastic because I’m trying to avoid gluing and painting until everything is fabricated and fully test fitted. This might sound obvious but in the past I have tended to glue and paint as I went along, leading to more problems than was necessary if I had been disciplined enough to complete all my sub-assemblies before doing finish work and assembly.

Next up will be the dashboard and windshield, which, once again, are interrelated. Once that’s done the interior will be complete and I can move on to finalizing the suspension bits and beginning paint and assembly.

Thanx for lookin’,
B.

 

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    September, 2008
  • From: East Templeton Ma
Posted by streetrod on Wednesday, April 25, 2012 10:13 PM

Hi Bernard,

Your project is looking better and better all the time. I'm very impressed with youe fab work and ingenuity. I really enjoy following your builds and am looking forward to the completion of this one as well. It's too bad that you and I live so far apart. It would be nice to meet in person and "shoot the "male cow" sometime. Maybe at some future date at NNL East.

Barry Fadden

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Wednesday, April 25, 2012 11:10 PM

Thanx Barry. I've really wanted to make it back East to do the rounds of some of the big model car shows. The style of modeling you guys turn out is right up my alley and it would be totally cool to hang out and shoot the breeze. Some day...

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Thursday, April 26, 2012 5:28 PM

This stage of doing the interior is now complete. I made the dashboard and windshield, both of which will receive more work as the build progresses. I’m accustomed to making complete interiors in advance of final assembly, including all paint and finish work. But that’s not possible here because of the bolster which runs all the way around the interior. It needs to be glued into the body before final sanding and filling to shape. After everything is primered using white primer I’ll mask the body and finish out the interior in Testors Pearl White. Then I’ll mask the interior, remove the body masking and paint the body Testors Inca Gold.

 

The dashboard turned out to be a very simple affair, with the continuation of the bolster across the front of the cabin and a simple rectangular dash with an oval extension dropping slightly below the lower edge containing a Model Car Garage photo-etch instrument cluster.

 

The windshield is a narrowed AMT ’32 Ford Phaeton piece which is held in place currently with rubber cement. It will most likely be chopped and have the upper cross piece removed.

 

For now it’s onwards to chassis, suspension, and body finish work in preparation for paint. Here are a coupla pics.

 

Thanx for lookin’,
B.

 

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Southern Maine
Posted by surfnut on Saturday, April 28, 2012 8:17 PM

That is one beautiful ride & some great craftsmanship. Love the scratch frame. It has been fun to watch this build progress & am looking forward to see the finished piece.

Classic Plastic Model Club.  Always watching for waves

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Thursday, May 17, 2012 1:43 PM

Thanx surfnut!

Giant sigh of relief!!!

I got the basic painting done, but not without some heavy melodrama. I started by shooting the frame and body in Duplicolor white primer. Then I masked the main body surfaces, leaving the upholstery exposed. The interior colors (Duplicolor Ivory White covered with Testors White Lightning pearl white) went on OK. Then I removed the main body masking and masked the upholstery surfaces in preparation for shooting the main body color of Testors Inca Gold. So far so good...

Unfortunately I got a defective can of Inca Gold which spattered as I sprayed the first coat. The damage was done, setting the basis for a bad case of orange peel. So I shot more color to fill in the gaps in the spatter. Then I waited 10 days for the paint to get good and hard and wet sanded with 1500 grit and 2000 grit and polished out the result. The paint surface was now nice and smooth but the uniformity of the metallic pattern was gone and there were spots where the primer showed through. So I got a replacement can of Inca Gold and hoped it was a good one. This time I test shot it on some scrap bodywork. It was good! And it went down smooth on the body!!! Then I applied 4 coats of Duplicolor clear.

The moment of truth came with removing the masking tape. The paint, it turns out, will require no touch up and has nice crisp edges. Here's a color check picture taken in bright sunlight. The contrast between the white upholstery surfaces and the flaked gold paint is what I was after. Major relief on my part... I'll wait a few days to polish out the clear. Meanwhile I'll paint the grill shell and some frame bits and begin assembly work.

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    December, 2005
  • From: Tennessee
Posted by SLUSHER on Thursday, May 17, 2012 6:17 PM

Really amazing work so far..Yes.and great color....Slusher

IT TAKES A LIVING SAVIOR TO SAVE A DYING WORLD....

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by FULL HOUSE FLATTY on Friday, May 18, 2012 8:32 AM

Thank you so much for sharing this awesome tutorial and incredible vintage Hot Rod Build ! You have helped me so much in my Revell 32 Five Window classic hot rod build.

You have absolutely nailed the vintage hot rod look.

Back in the late fifties or early sixties on an episode of Ozzie and Harriet, there was an incredible hot rod in one of the episodes that looked a lot like your inspiration from the one in Hot Rods To Hell.

 It certainly got my attention as a ten or twelve year old kid back then.

My pappy said son you gonna drive me to drinking, if you don't stop driving that Hot Rod Lincoln ! Cool

  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Friday, May 18, 2012 10:46 AM

Very kind of you. Thanx.

Here's the Tony La Masa roadster lent to the Nelsons for use in their TV show:

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by FULL HOUSE FLATTY on Saturday, May 19, 2012 12:42 PM

You're most welcome. Thanks for posting that vintage rod from Ozzie and Harriet. That thing is mouth watering !

I really like the detail shots of your chassis mods, and your craftsmanship throughout.

I hope to be posting some shots in the near future of my five window, after we get moved to our new residence. I have everything packed up at this point.

My five window will be the vintage version with the hairpins, steelies, baby moons and beauty rings from the Revell kit. 

The mill will be the 409 from the skip's fiesta 55. That's a fiddly kit, but the motor has a lot of detail, and that 409 with the dual quad intake looks a lot like the infamous Z11 427 based on  Chevy's 409.

Thanks again for posting your great step by step build. I'm really loving it.

 

My pappy said son you gonna drive me to drinking, if you don't stop driving that Hot Rod Lincoln ! Cool

  • Member since
    September, 2008
  • From: East Templeton Ma
Posted by streetrod on Sunday, May 20, 2012 9:24 PM

Hi Bernard,

It's looking real nice. I also can't wait to see the finished piece. I always look forward to following your WIPs.

Barry Fadden

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: The Great Northwest (SPOKANE)
Posted by Space Cowboy on Sunday, May 20, 2012 10:08 PM

That color suits the car perfect. Its great to see your work step by step...................

(I Love It When A Plan Comes Together) Hannibal Smith.

http://s116.photobucket.com/albums/o33/moose5147/

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