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1962 Chrysler Imperial - DONE.

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  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
1962 Chrysler Imperial - DONE.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Saturday, January 21, 2012 12:00 AM

I'm periodically trying something new that intrigues me, and motivates me to be a better modeler. This will be a bit of a different style for me. I love the flambouyant, elegant cars of the 50's and 60's, so I'm stepping into new territory for me in this type and style of building, and I'm expecting it should be challanging and  fun.

 I've never done BMF script detailing, and could use all the pointers and advise anyone would care to share. Never seen anyone do a "How to", so any help would be much appreciated.

Here's the project I'll be working on. This is a "builder" I got some time ago, that was fairly incomplete, so Modelhaus came to the rescue once again, and as usual the parts to finish the car are "Spectacular".

I am amazed at the quality of this incredibly old tooling, and the crispness seldom seen today in a lot of modern kits. Not knocking todays stuff one bit, just wasn't expecting the high quality of this model - the body especially, and the script detail. The interior is somewhat lacking, but easily excuseable due to the lack of period technology.

 As this is somewhat of a rare kit, I've never seen one at a contest or anywhere before, even with all the events I've been to over the years. I have seen some on ebay, but usually they're pretty trashed like mine was. This will be the first one for me to ever see done in person, so I want to do as nice a job as I can.

There are some amazing "Masters" out there who do incredible work painting and detailing these beautiful old pieces of rare art, but I never see opening features, so I'm going to open the doors and the trunk, and detail everything the best I know how, and put hinges on everything that opens and closes.

Here are some beginning pics and a bit of progress to get past all the parts that had been glued on it at one time, probably by some well-meaning youngster. Thank goodness the windshield frame and all the trim and script were mostly just like new. Just required a bit of touch-up in a couple of places.

Love Velocity channel, Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I learn so much there.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Mexico City
Posted by SrMopar on Saturday, January 21, 2012 1:14 AM

Hello Treehugger Dave!

I find yours a great idea to build such a beautiful car, as  I'm a Mopar fan Big Smile

A loooooooong time ago, a fellow modeler (he has a lot of experience and excellent craftsmanship)  taught me how to foil script details on model cars: using kitchen aluminum foil and Microscale Metal Foil adhesive (had best results using the Reynolds brand) and just at the point you are right now is a good time to do this. Apply the adhesive to a piece of foil that is about at least twice the size of he script, handle, logo, etc. you're going to foil. Then, with the tip of a wooden toothpick or something similar, "re-draw" the script all around its contour, and inside the "O's", "A's", etc.Use a soft, cotton cloth to press the foil against the plastic.

 

Then, with a really -almost surgical- sharp and NEW blade, cut the excess  material, again, following the path. Be careful when removing the excess, and clean with a benzine solvent, it will remove the glue and will not harm the primer.

It will be covered with paint that can be carefully removed via polishing and/or sanding very lightly with high grade sand paper (2000 and up). By the end of the paint job, it will show through with clean and sharp edges.

Of course, as everything, this procedure requires some practice and it is not as hard or tedious as it sounds and rewards with really nice results.

At this moment I don't have a close up pic to show, just this 61 Ford I did some time ago on which I did the hood Ford and side  Ranchero markings using this techique:

 

I'll try to post a "How to" tread on this soon to give you the chance to take a closer look at it, as well as some close up pics of finished examples.

It can also be done with BMF, but being as thin as it is, it will take more careful work to avoid taking it away.

Of course, something to consider is how many coats of paint do you usually apply, since the script might get lost under the paint.

There is always the Photo-etch option too, in the case that there are available sets for your specific model.

I will love to hear more options to do this, because, besides painting them silver with a tooth pic or very fine brush, I don't know any otehr way to do this.

Hope this works for you Big Smile

 

  • Member since
    December, 2011
  • From: Havant, hampshire, UK
Posted by popeyesurf on Saturday, January 21, 2012 1:45 AM

Hi, hope you dont mind me butting in, how SrMopar is describing it is juist about how i'm diong it with bmf although i always dont it after the color coat and before the final clear laqure (if the model's getting any) i never thought of doing it before any painting, i would also love to see a "how to", this is just a pic of the script on a lincoln, it is very fiddely and as said a brand new scalple knife is a must, along with (fo me) my reading glasses and an angle poise mag lit thing, be lost without that, i have my nose up against it so much i have to clean the oily nose marks off every time i use itBig Smile

i was ver interested about the phot-etch you mention, is there a etch sheet that contains loads of verious car logo's/scripts in verious styles? that would be great but i'm guessing you have to get a set for a particular model which would mean buying a set every time you buy a model kit,

scalelink here in the uk do a brass etch sheet of verious size letters and numbers but they are all "capitol's" and of course brass so i never conciderd useing them on model cars (used sme on model ships tho)

thanks and that chrysler's a great find, i have a 59 still in the box, yours is gonna look great!Thumbs Up

too young to die and too old to give a stuffBig Smile

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Saturday, January 21, 2012 2:00 AM

Thank you both for replying Cool.

Two totally different ways to foil, but both great options. So much appreciated. I hope there may be a few other idea's to try, as the more choices the better.

Thanks again for responding from so far away. Glad your both here enjoying this great hobby and the forum Thumbs Up.

All the best

Dave

Love Velocity channel, Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I learn so much there.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2008
  • From: West Virginia
Posted by gramps-xrds on Saturday, January 21, 2012 10:38 AM

Love those old Chrysler's Dave. Can't wait ta see this one done.

Bill AKA Gramps
  • Member since
    February, 2005
  • From: Southeast Pennsylvania
Posted by peanutgallery on Saturday, January 21, 2012 11:40 AM

Dave....Back in the 50's and 60's, the benefit of having a convertible "Land Yatch" was it cut down the time it took to Simoniz the  car......3 square inches at a time. Will be following your WIP.

Dennis

 

  • Member since
    February, 2010
Posted by ace-garageguy on Saturday, January 21, 2012 12:27 PM

Dave, it's great to see you stepping out of the comfort zone and developing a new skill. I figured you'd already have this process whipped.....I certainly don't, and in all honesty, it's probably one of the reasons I shy away from building box-stock....so I don't have to deal with the emblems.

I'll be really interested to see which technique you ultimately endorse. Your results may inspire me to try an entirely different kind of build.

Plan your work, work your plan.

Measure twice, post once.

  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Shepherdsville, KY
Posted by speedfische on Saturday, January 21, 2012 12:55 PM

I love this project, Dave!  I also am a big fan of building cars that are rarely seen or built.  I will definitely be following this one and enjoying it as much as I did your Henry J WIP.

Several great ideas for detailing the scripts have already been given by the gentlemen before me, but I thought I might throw out another option that I just recently tried on my Falcon.  I knew I wanted to be able to lay several coats of primer, color, and clear on the body, and then polish it all out with my LMG kit, and I didn't want to sand away or "overpaint"  the scripts in the process.  So, I cast new ones and removed the ones on the side of the car.  The process went something like this:

I applied a very light coat of Vaseline to the existing script and fender area of the plastic body.  Then I applied a generous amount of that orange automotive silicone gasket maker (that you find in the tube) over the script and let it dry overnight.  The next day, I carefully peeled off the silicone, and had a nice flexible mold.  I made several of these since I figured some might get ruined, lost or destroyed.

I then filled the molds with JB Weld epoxy, wiped off the excess with rubbing alcohol on a Q-tip, and let them dry.  The following day, I very carefully worked the scripts out of the molds with an exacto knife and gently afixed them to purple masking tape (the kind that has almost no tack to it).  While on that tape, I sprayed them with Alclad black base, and then Alclad chrome.

I made about two or three times as many as I would need for the car, in case any of them were broken or lost.  Then I sanded off the original scripts so that they would not be in the way of a good polish job on the body.  When the body was finished, I just glued them in place.  Here's a picture of one.  Sorry about the quality; my old camera does not do too well in very close situations.

 

Anyway, I'm really looking forward to seeing this project!

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Saturday, January 21, 2012 1:43 PM

Thanks guys for all the great idea's and encouragement Cool.

Here's a few more WIP shots.

Quite a bit of the car came complete like the cross-ram engine. It just needs to be disassembled detailed and then re-assembled and installed. Really quite a nice kit for the age.

And here she is, all boxed up in her little home Cool.

Love Velocity channel, Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I learn so much there.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Saturday, January 21, 2012 6:30 PM

This is where I lay the foundation for opening the doors and the trunk. especially the doors. Where the doors are cut out i need to support the body at the door sills, with brass strips under the doors, behind the body, so the body won't flex or break. 'I have examples here I'll share of another car I did, and I plenty strong. Stronger before the doors were cuy out.

Any]way, here's some pics to see how I'll re-inforce the 62'' Imperial door jam area.

Here's the brass I'll cut for re-inforcement on my bandsaw.

Here's a '62 Chevy 'vert with the same re-enforcement I'll put in the Imperial. You wouldn't believe how ridged a small amount of brass like this works, and really stabilizes the foundation of the build.

Here you can see it a bit better, along with the same type of hinges I'll use.

 

Love Velocity channel, Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I learn so much there.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    February, 2010
Posted by ace-garageguy on Sunday, January 22, 2012 7:22 PM

Amazing you got the cross-ram intact, and it wasn't glue-melted down to slag, like most of them I've seen. Interesting use of brass in the door sills too. They need something, for sure.

I usually go the overkill route, and mount the body on a temporary fixture during cutting, then use the trimmed doors as additional fixtures while I add a couple layers of very fine model airplane fiberglass or carbon strips, with real-airplane epoxy to the inside of the sills.

Your hinges look great too. It looks to me like this style will disappear much like real ones when all of the interior and door panels are in place. Nice work.

Plan your work, work your plan.

Measure twice, post once.

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Sunday, January 22, 2012 8:37 PM

ace-garageguy

Amazing you got the cross-ram intact, and it wasn't glue-melted down to slag, like most of them I've seen. Interesting use of brass in the door sills too. They need something, for sure.

I usually go the overkill route, and mount the body on a temporary fixture during cutting, then use the trimmed doors as additional fixtures while I add a couple layers of very fine model airplane fiberglass or carbon strips, with real-airplane epoxy to the inside of the sills.

Your hinges look great too. It looks to me like this style will disappear much like real ones when all of the interior and door panels are in place. Nice work.

Painting the higes help them sorta disappear  Always does. Gotta understand how peoples eyes work.

Tomrrow I may start with a #11 xacto blade at the the bottom part of the doors first, all the way through, so I can see where to super-glue the brass strip. Once that's done, I'll finish opening up ther doors, one at a time.

That way the body stays ridged, and there is no warp or twist, as thereis non right now. The car sits flat Thumbs Up

Then I'll do the trunk - I HOPE - LOL

Love Velocity channel, Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I learn so much there.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: The Great Northwest (SPOKANE)
Posted by Space Cowboy on Sunday, January 22, 2012 8:51 PM

I am impressed with your attention to detail and finish. This one will be a real show stopper......................

(I Love It When A Plan Comes Together) Hannibal Smith.

http://s116.photobucket.com/albums/o33/moose5147/

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Saturday, March 03, 2012 12:14 PM

I have really enjoyed raising the bar for myself on opening features. I've done a few here and there in the past, but most everything on the bench has open doors, trunk, etc.

Haven't really thought about where I'm going with this yet. No wheel/tire or color choices yet either. I' think I'll just let this one develope as it goes.

Anyway, a couple of pics.

Thanks for lookin' in.

Love Velocity channel, Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I learn so much there.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    February, 2010
Posted by ace-garageguy on Saturday, March 03, 2012 1:34 PM

Dave, that thing is killer in the weeds. I really think you should chop it. Of course, I think everything should be chopped. Your opening doors continue to be an inspiration. I think the wheel/tire combo you're showing there really works on this body too. The car has some over-the-top sculptural details, and those wheels make it all pop.

Plan your work, work your plan.

Measure twice, post once.

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Saturday, March 03, 2012 11:50 PM

Thanks Ace Big Smile

When building a convertible and opening the doors, there needs to be built a foundation of strength and ridgidity so the whole project can be successful.

Adding brass supports along the bottom of the body brings that together.

I decided that I needed to scribe through the lowest portion of the doors so I could see where the brass strips needed to be installed before the doors were cut completely open. This keeps the car body not only ridged but aligned correctly once the doors are open, and then when I add the jams that just adds more, along with using .030" thick brass strips instead of the usual .020" thick.

Once I cut through the body, I measured that distance, then transfered it to a piece of brass, and cut that on my bandsaw. I sanded both the brass strip and the plastic surface for good adhesion, squirted on some super-glue, and once in place, used some Zap-it to make it permanent.

Adsding the brass strips now also helps me not break the body when I'm using pressure to knife out the doors. The plastic turned out to be especially "tough" and thick material, and took way more time and "muscle", so I was really glad I had chosen to do it this way. The doors took over two hours each, and the trunk over three hours to knife out. The windwings were especially "tricky" and required a lot of patience, so as not to damage in any way.

Here's some beginning pics.

(The pencil line I drew with the arrow pointing to it, to "Highlight" the cut-through is kinda crooked, but the cut was straight as you'll see in the next pick from the outside.)

Here I used a small block of wood to place the brass on to slide through the bandsaw, so the brass will stay flat and not get damaged during the cutting process.

And here's the brass installed .

Love Velocity channel, Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I learn so much there.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    August, 2009
Posted by Spex84 on Sunday, March 04, 2012 12:58 AM

Looking good!

I once cut the doors out of a (Revell?) '62 Bel Air convertible. Needless to say, it's now a bag of parts and the big ol' body panels are a test bed for paint and weathering ideas.  Those skinny little rocker panels definitely need reinforcement!

Have you ever used the technique of running a thread through a small hole in the panel line and then sawing the panel line open with the thread? It doesn't always make the cleanest cut, but it goes pretty quickly once friction heats the plastic.

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Sunday, March 04, 2012 7:22 PM

[quote user="Spex84

Have you ever used the technique of running a thread through a small hole in the panel line and then sawing the panel line open with the thread? It doesn't always make the cleanest cut, but it goes pretty quickly once friction heats the plastic.

[/quote]

Thanks Spex84

Well, here you can see some pieces of plastic I'm using for the jams on the body around the door openings. It's just some .040" Evergreen sheet cut to size, glued in place, and then sanded to shape.

 

Love Velocity channel, Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I learn so much there.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Tuesday, March 06, 2012 4:32 PM

I love each stage of the building process, from the planning, to the cutting, shaping, fitting, and the priming trying to keep all the details like the script and door edges sharp and really crisp. Seems like a lot of the time your walking a fine line, and I love that part of the challange.

I got the trunk lid cut out pretty cleanly, but the plastic was way too thick to leave it that way, so I spent a lot of time thinning out the body around the trunk opening, and also thinning out the trunk lid to be a bit more scale. The red filler will be mostly gone after I'm done, as it's just there to even things out.

In the past it wouldn't have been that big of a deal, but like everyone, we get pickier as our skills increase.

Anyway, here's a few update picks.

Love Velocity channel, Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I learn so much there.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Wednesday, March 07, 2012 3:19 PM

Starting to make some progress on getting the filler work done and some light coats of primer to keep the script and body edges crisp and sharp, and got the doors to fit real nice. Next will be to add the trunk jam, and then I'll start on some hinging..

Even with the doors out, the body is extremely ridged where the brass was installed at the weakest points. The body doesn't flex at all, and the windshield frame is extremely strong where I added the extra support with the jam..

Love Velocity channel, Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I learn so much there.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    March, 2012
Posted by sagarodder on Wednesday, March 07, 2012 6:12 PM

Excellent work !

I'm learning such a lot following your build.

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Wednesday, March 07, 2012 7:24 PM

sagarodder

Excellent work !

I'm learning such a lot following your build.

Great to hear that Thumbs Up. Thank you.

As I'm finishing up the door jams, thought I'd share a few other things that are going on and some that haven't started yet.

The trunk jam is well under way as is the lid itself. The interior will be the single biggest job on this build. I will have to cut it completely apart and then rebuild it with new floor boards , changes in the seat shapes, and pretty much create new door panels from my research. A beautiful car, and so worth the effort.

Anyway, pics usually tell a better story so here's a few.

Evergreen sheet plastic used for the trunk jam, and clamped in place to dry..

Top side.

Under side.

The next several pics are of the interior, and how things are going to have to change to re-create it to work.

Love Velocity channel, Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I learn so much there.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    February, 2005
  • From: Southeast Pennsylvania
Posted by peanutgallery on Wednesday, March 07, 2012 8:24 PM

Dave....i really enjoy your WIP's   I marvel at your scratch building skills

Dennis

 

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Midwest
Posted by High octane on Wednesday, March 07, 2012 8:31 PM

Dave, you've got a lot of work into that build already and I can tell that it's gonna be an awesome lookin' "boulevard barge" when you're done. Great work!

High octane

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Thursday, March 08, 2012 7:02 PM

High octane

Dave, you've got a lot of work into that build already and I can tell that it's gonna be an awesome lookin' "boulevard barge" when you're done. Great work!

"Boulevard Barge" - That's funny Cool. I never heard that term before.

Well, it's time to "hack" up the interior tub and make something a little more presentable. It was really nice for it's time, but as you can see everything was molded on an extreme angle to come out of the injection molding dies as a one-piece unit.

I did some research on the interior and got some real nice pics of a real cars interior that's beautiful, so that'll be my model for re-creating the new "old" interior - or is that old new interior???

Thank goodness I have a bandsaw with a new fine-toothed blade on it. I butchered the door panels off, and had to make templates for the tub, that turned into a jigging fixture for re-assembling the interior tub, after it gets cut into  a buncha pieces, and some new pieces including a new floor board will be added back into the original configuration - At least that's the plan....we'll see!!

Here's some pics of the complicated proceedure. Actually only took a little over an hour to build after slicing and dicing the the interior.

OK now, here's where the templates begin for the jigging fixture. I laid the interior as you see it in the previous pic on it's side on a piece of .040" thick Evergreen sheet plastic, to get the outline of the backside of the tub for both the drivers side and the passenger side.

Alright, this is where the templates begin turning into a fixture.

Thankfully I have a machine shop and some of these machiniste right angle blocks for fixture making. Came in handy.

 

Love Velocity channel, Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I learn so much there.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Thursday, March 08, 2012 7:26 PM

>If you missed the last post, this won't make nearly as much sense to you, unless you go back.<

This is where the jigging fixture starts coming together, and you'll see why I had to go to so much trouble.

This first template has been super-glued to it's base.

Here are both side glued in place, and the end-supports added for ridgidity.

Here you can see the extreme angle the seats were molded that I want to remove, and get the seats looking more like the originals from the side with the doors open.

Here's the tub sitting in place, waiting for a few adjustments and more pieces.

 

 In this last pic, there are lines on the back side of the tub that line-up with the fixture uprights. I will glue some alignment pieces over those pencil lines on the tub, to lock the tub pieces into place for alignment once the tub has been cut into several pieces. Then I can add a new floorboard, and remove the angles of the lower parts of the seats, and have everything go back where it belongs. Sounds complicated, but fun for me.

IF YOUR CONFUSED, the next few installments will clairify things - I HOPE - LOL Smile, Wink & Grin

Love Velocity channel, Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I learn so much there.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Saturday, March 10, 2012 12:46 PM

I hope maybe this begins to clear things up.

These next few pics show the bottom side of the interior tub with pieces of plastic to act as locators onto the fixture, so when the tub is cut up, the individual pieces will go back to exactly wher they belong, and allow new pieces to be added, and mods to be made, but when finally assembled, will be the same size and dimensions, and fit right back in where the original fit - that's the idea.

Pictures always work better, so here they are.

Bottom of tub with locators.

OK. The tub is now cut up, and the pics show how the various pieces can locate into the fixture all by themselves. The pieces you'll see will eventually be cut up more and re-positioned, and some new pieces added.

Love Velocity channel, Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I learn so much there.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Saturday, March 10, 2012 9:53 PM

Well' now that the interior is cut up, the front seat back-support was weakened quite a bit to work properly in the jig, plus the sides needed closing up. I cut out two pieces of Evergreen plastic, shaped them, and glued them in place, as you'll see in the next few pics.

The next thing was to add small strips of plastic to the jig, so the seat will stay aligned.

This is where I have to begin modifying the jig several times so I can make all the changes to the seats.

Here's the jig with the strips added for support and alignment.

Before the bottom of the seats can be cut and angled back more like the real thing, I'll need to cut clearance notches from the jig.

And the notches.

Love Velocity channel, Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I learn so much there.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Saturday, March 10, 2012 10:19 PM

The next thing to happen now is cutting the front seat lower piece off, and tuck it back under like a normal seat.

First I had to lay it out, as you can see by the yellow arrow, then feed it through the bandsaw.

And here it is assembled.

The back seat is next. The floorboard portion needed to be removed to begin.

Like clearances for the front seat, the jig needed to be modified again with notches so the lower portion of the rear seat could be moved back after removal, more like a normal seat.

 

Love Velocity channel, Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I learn so much there.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Saturday, March 10, 2012 10:52 PM

Here you can see where the material was removed to make room for the lower part of the seat.

Both seats done, and ready for a new floorboard. The front seat will remain a seperate piece, and be installed after the floorboard is made and glued into place, and the carpet is laid down.

 

Love Velocity channel, Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I learn so much there.

 

 

                                     

 

 

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