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1969 Plymouth GTX WIP; Finished - Outdoor Pics!

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  • Member since
    March 2006
  • From: Spring, Tx
1969 Plymouth GTX WIP; Finished - Outdoor Pics!
Posted by modelcarjr on Wednesday, April 8, 2020 7:37 PM

I started this one in Race Cars but have changed my mind. I was going to build it as a funny car but am now going to build it as a muscle car. It is a Jo-Han kit and I like the proportions of the body better than the AMT kit. The hood was damaged by a tire that sat on it for years even before I got it. I tried to fix the hood but I don't like how it turned out. So I bought an AMT kit to sand down the hood a bit as it almost fits. The the engine, chassis and interior from the AMT kit are much better than the Jo-han kit. 

So far, I have prepped the body, mold lines, sink marks, etc. Since I have some time until I receive the AMT kit by mail I have also added a vinyl roof using 2-inch masking tape and painted it and the rocker panel areas. I will paint the rest of the body Light Blue Metallic with a white and blue interior but will wait until I get the kit to test-fit and modify parts, as necessary, before I paint. Here are a few pics:

If you cannot have a good time, what kinda time can you have? JR

Next on the bench:  Another 1970 Hemi 'Cuda, 1958 Chevy Impala, 1987 Buick GNX, 1950 Chevy Pick-up, Indy Reynard, 1965 Corvette, probably not in this order.

  • Member since
    March 2006
  • From: Spring, Tx
Posted by modelcarjr on Wednesday, April 8, 2020 7:41 PM

If you cannot have a good time, what kinda time can you have? JR

Next on the bench:  Another 1970 Hemi 'Cuda, 1958 Chevy Impala, 1987 Buick GNX, 1950 Chevy Pick-up, Indy Reynard, 1965 Corvette, probably not in this order.

  • Member since
    March 2006
  • From: Spring, Tx
Posted by modelcarjr on Friday, April 10, 2020 9:26 AM

When I ordered my 69 AMT Plymouth GTX there was a warning that they would ship what was in stock, either the hardtop or the convertible. I took a chance since I can't go to the store itself. Of course, I received the convertible. Thinking that the covertible interior wouldn't work, I deconstructed the AMT hardtop I had previously built a few year ago. I moved both the right and left door panels inward and shortened the dash on the right side a about 1/8" using a razor saw. I was able to then fit the interior into the Johan body. After looking over the Convertible instructions it appears that the convertible interior is the same as the hardtop with additional backseat bolsters that can be added for the convertible. Oh well, maybe I'll build the convertible later. 

Another thing that I wanted to do was to add steel wheels with dog dishes so I removed the suspensions from the chassis. Since I am painted the body light blue metallic I also need to paint the doghouse the same color. So I borrowed the doghouse, wheel backs and suspensions from convertible. I am going to use the deeper blue chassis pan and the engine that I was able to remove intact including the radiator and hoses. I also sanded down the convertible hood to fit the Johan body. I think the Jo-Han body will look better than the AMT body and I didn't like the paint, chrome rockers and red accents that I added to the previous build so i will like this one better. 

It rained yesterday evening and is suppose to rain on the weekend. There may be a window to paint the body and related parts later today. If I can get that done today I think I am in business to complete the build! Here are a few pics. Thanks for looking! Cool

If you cannot have a good time, what kinda time can you have? JR

Next on the bench:  Another 1970 Hemi 'Cuda, 1958 Chevy Impala, 1987 Buick GNX, 1950 Chevy Pick-up, Indy Reynard, 1965 Corvette, probably not in this order.

  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: East Bethel, Mn
Posted by midnightprowler on Friday, April 10, 2020 11:39 AM

I missed this. Looks great so far.

1 Corinthians 15:51-54
1 Thessalonians 4:13-18

Ask me about Speedway Decals

  • Member since
    March 2006
  • From: Spring, Tx
Posted by modelcarjr on Friday, April 10, 2020 5:42 PM

Thanks, Prowler! I appreciate your comment! 

I got up this morning and after it rained last night it was still wet and humid. But as the day went on it was a little breezy and warmed up a bit so I started the painting about 1 PM. It couldn't have gone any better! The paint and clear went on as smooth as ice! I may not even have to rub this one out. Probably just a light polishing. Thanks for looking! Cool

  

If you cannot have a good time, what kinda time can you have? JR

Next on the bench:  Another 1970 Hemi 'Cuda, 1958 Chevy Impala, 1987 Buick GNX, 1950 Chevy Pick-up, Indy Reynard, 1965 Corvette, probably not in this order.

  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: East Bethel, Mn
Posted by midnightprowler on Friday, April 10, 2020 6:11 PM

Beautiful color.

1 Corinthians 15:51-54
1 Thessalonians 4:13-18

Ask me about Speedway Decals

  • Member since
    March 2006
  • From: Spring, Tx
Posted by modelcarjr on Sunday, April 12, 2020 12:11 PM

Thanks, Prowler! I appreciate your comment!

I rubbed out the body using the Micromesh cloths only on the flat surfaces like the trunk. I still have the hood to-do but I've foiled the body. The rest of the body just needed rubbing with some Scratch-X. I'll move on to window glass and putting the chassis and wheels together and then this one should be ready to finish. Thanks for looking! Cool

If you cannot have a good time, what kinda time can you have? JR

Next on the bench:  Another 1970 Hemi 'Cuda, 1958 Chevy Impala, 1987 Buick GNX, 1950 Chevy Pick-up, Indy Reynard, 1965 Corvette, probably not in this order.

  • Member since
    March 2006
  • From: Spring, Tx
Posted by modelcarjr on Monday, April 13, 2020 4:48 PM

I've installed the interior, the doghouse is built and the chassis floorpan is in. I had test-fitted everything earlier but as I started to install the floor pan ran into some issues. I had to remove the front of the rear fender wheel well, remove the crossmember at the rear of the floorpan behind the gas tank and then shorten the front leaf springs about 1/8" in order to get the right wheel position. I cut the leaf spring in front of the axle joint, removed an 1/8", and then drilled holes to pin the front leaf springs. I also had to drill new holes for the rear leaf spring mount and will have to shorten the driveshaft as well. But now everthing is in place. 

I will attach the front suspension with the engine mounted and then I am ready for wheels and tires. Thanks for looking! Cool

If you cannot have a good time, what kinda time can you have? JR

Next on the bench:  Another 1970 Hemi 'Cuda, 1958 Chevy Impala, 1987 Buick GNX, 1950 Chevy Pick-up, Indy Reynard, 1965 Corvette, probably not in this order.

  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: East Bethel, Mn
Posted by midnightprowler on Monday, April 13, 2020 4:55 PM

Beautiful but don't know why you had to modify things.

1 Corinthians 15:51-54
1 Thessalonians 4:13-18

Ask me about Speedway Decals

  • Member since
    March 2010
  • From: Midwest
Posted by High octane on Monday, April 13, 2020 8:53 PM

That GTX is lookin' great and of course I just love dem B-body Mopars!

High octane

  • Member since
    March 2006
  • From: Spring, Tx
Posted by modelcarjr on Tuesday, April 14, 2020 4:45 PM

Thanks, Prowler and Octane! I appreciate your comments! 

Let me try to explain my surgery on the chassis floor pan a little better. First, this is a Jo-han body on an AMT chassis, engine and interior. When I placed the floor pan in place over the interior in a position that the floor pan was tightly in place inside the body, the front of the rear wheel well hung into the wheel opening. When I tried to push it forward it ran into the back of the interior bucket. The floor pan met the firewall when snugly in postion. 

So when I removed the front portion of the rear wheel well it also required that I move the axle forward 1/8" in order for the tire and wheel to be in the right position. I also had to remove the rear crossmember behind the gas tank from the floor pan so that the bumper will fit. In short, the AMT body is longer ande more squatty bulging sides. The Jo-Han body is shorter and less squatty or more upright in my opinion. If you measure from the door line to the rear the AMT body is 3.5". The Jo-Han body is 3 and 3 3/8". Here are some photos:

 

If you cannot have a good time, what kinda time can you have? JR

Next on the bench:  Another 1970 Hemi 'Cuda, 1958 Chevy Impala, 1987 Buick GNX, 1950 Chevy Pick-up, Indy Reynard, 1965 Corvette, probably not in this order.

  • Member since
    March 2006
  • From: Spring, Tx
Posted by modelcarjr on Tuesday, April 14, 2020 9:59 PM

A few more progress photos:

If you cannot have a good time, what kinda time can you have? JR

Next on the bench:  Another 1970 Hemi 'Cuda, 1958 Chevy Impala, 1987 Buick GNX, 1950 Chevy Pick-up, Indy Reynard, 1965 Corvette, probably not in this order.

  • Member since
    December 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Wednesday, April 15, 2020 8:55 AM

Wow. Looking great. Nice work on the vinyl roof, and love the steelies. 

"It would be unusual, if the unusual didn't occur."

- Steamboat Gariepy

Trevor

  • Member since
    March 2006
  • From: Spring, Tx
Posted by modelcarjr on Wednesday, April 15, 2020 1:05 PM

Thanks, Trevor! I appreciate your comments! 

Its done!  I tried to load this one up with everything 1969. Here are the hightlights:

Better proportioned Jo-Han bodywith bumpers grill and taillight panel; Bright Light Blue Metallic exterior with BMF and black rockers; White and blue detailed interior with wood accents (AMT); Vinyl Roof; Steel wheels with dog dish hupcaps (Parts box); Detailed 440, 4 barrel with detailed engine compartment (AMT). Here are the outdoor photos:

 

If you cannot have a good time, what kinda time can you have? JR

Next on the bench:  Another 1970 Hemi 'Cuda, 1958 Chevy Impala, 1987 Buick GNX, 1950 Chevy Pick-up, Indy Reynard, 1965 Corvette, probably not in this order.

  • Member since
    March 2006
  • From: Spring, Tx
Posted by modelcarjr on Wednesday, April 15, 2020 1:10 PM

A few more:

If you cannot have a good time, what kinda time can you have? JR

Next on the bench:  Another 1970 Hemi 'Cuda, 1958 Chevy Impala, 1987 Buick GNX, 1950 Chevy Pick-up, Indy Reynard, 1965 Corvette, probably not in this order.

  • Member since
    November 2007
  • From: Denver, Colorado
Posted by Classic Plastic on Wednesday, April 15, 2020 2:46 PM

WOW!Another fine build MCJR. Your attention to detail amazzzes me. Love the vinyl top. I'm not a MOPAR guy but, this build is right-on!

Kevin
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: East Bethel, Mn
Posted by midnightprowler on Wednesday, April 15, 2020 4:25 PM

Simply stellar.

1 Corinthians 15:51-54
1 Thessalonians 4:13-18

Ask me about Speedway Decals

  • Member since
    January 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Wednesday, April 15, 2020 5:42 PM

Another beauty, JR! Great color combo and details including my favorite: dog dish hubcaps. Lookin' for the next one!   

chucky

  • Member since
    March 2006
  • From: Spring, Tx
Posted by modelcarjr on Wednesday, April 15, 2020 8:42 PM

Thanks, Kevin, Prowler and Chucky! I appreciate your comments! Cool

If you cannot have a good time, what kinda time can you have? JR

Next on the bench:  Another 1970 Hemi 'Cuda, 1958 Chevy Impala, 1987 Buick GNX, 1950 Chevy Pick-up, Indy Reynard, 1965 Corvette, probably not in this order.

  • Member since
    December 2019
Posted by amt68 on Thursday, April 16, 2020 10:07 PM

Top notch work as always modelcarjr. I really like the look of the masking tape vinyl top. My only reluctance to use this method was concern for the tape to lift over time. What has been your experience using the masking tape method? Thanks. 

  • Member since
    December 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Thursday, April 16, 2020 10:14 PM

Very nice, Junior. That's a fine looking GTX. The outdoor shots really bring it to life. Well done. 

"It would be unusual, if the unusual didn't occur."

- Steamboat Gariepy

Trevor

  • Member since
    October 2011
Posted by OrangeR/T on Friday, April 17, 2020 1:38 PM

Very nice!! Love the painted steelies/dog dishes!! The vinyl top blows my mind, man i gotta try the masking tape trick sometime, looks very realistic!! Yes

  • Member since
    March 2006
  • From: Spring, Tx
Posted by modelcarjr on Wednesday, April 29, 2020 6:53 AM

Thanks, amt, Trevor and Orange! I appreciate your comments! 

I have never had a problem with tape lifting, although I have heard that worried premonition many times. Its not a method that is taught by the "experts". First, every article I have seen would have you tape two strips of plastic to the top. That is a disaster waiting to happen because if you glue the strips down straight on the first try, you will probably still have to sand out any glue that slips out from under the strip.

Next, the experts would have you use some kind of thick "leather effect" paint that nobody can find anywhere, except maybe online for a high price, plus shipping. Then, using the paint for the first time, you may not get it on evenly the first time, which may require stripping and starting over (Oops,there goes the plastic strip). 

Using tape is very easy. First buy a 2" roll of 3M/Scotch brand tape. I have had my roll for about 20 years and am still using it. Next, divide the roof into 3 sections, using a ruler and mark it front and back. Apply the two sides first, pressing the tape down good with your fingers, a Q-tip and a square to round toothpick. Start with a new #11 blade and cut slowly once, around the edges of the chrome trim on most models.

Next, cut the middle section about 1/16" wider than is needed on both sides (this will require a ruler and a hard surface such as a cutting board, which most of us use on our workbench,  and is sold at Michaels or Hobby Lobby). Make sure that the surface is clean and free of any specs of dirt, paint, or other trash as the tape will pick up anything on the surfance and then it will show under your vinyl top. Overlap the edges of the middle section 1/16" on each side and you're done except for paint (no plastic strip needed!). I use a generic flat black paint and then give it a light coat or sprits of clear lacquer after to give it a bit of sheen.

I do apply round rod 0.030" to the bottom of the "B" pillar so it is important to be careful when applying glue in a thin bead. You can still sand it out before painting if glue is misapplied.  Then simply foil the rod after paint. It takes maybe two hours tops and is a great method! 

Here's one from about 15 years ago, an award winner, 1967 Chevy Chevelle. No lift! Thanks for looking and I hope this helps!

 

If you cannot have a good time, what kinda time can you have? JR

Next on the bench:  Another 1970 Hemi 'Cuda, 1958 Chevy Impala, 1987 Buick GNX, 1950 Chevy Pick-up, Indy Reynard, 1965 Corvette, probably not in this order.

  • Member since
    December 2019
Posted by amt68 on Wednesday, April 29, 2020 5:08 PM

Thanks modelcarjr for your thorough reply. I will save this thread and refer back to your expertise when I attempt my first vinyl top in this fashion. I actually have that same model Chevelle in my stash and it makes an excellent candidate for a vinyl top. 

  • Member since
    March 2006
  • From: Spring, Tx
Posted by modelcarjr on Monday, May 4, 2020 7:38 AM

Your welcome, Amt! Feel free to PM me if you have any questions! Cool

If you cannot have a good time, what kinda time can you have? JR

Next on the bench:  Another 1970 Hemi 'Cuda, 1958 Chevy Impala, 1987 Buick GNX, 1950 Chevy Pick-up, Indy Reynard, 1965 Corvette, probably not in this order.

  • Member since
    May 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Monday, May 4, 2020 7:12 PM

modelcarjr

Thanks, amt, Trevor and Orange! I appreciate your comments! 

I have never had a problem with tape lifting, although I have heard that worried premonition many times. Its not a method that is taught by the "experts". First, every article I have seen would have you tape two strips of plastic to the top. That is a disaster waiting to happen because if you glue the strips down straight on the first try, you will probably still have to sand out any glue that slips out from under the strip.

Next, the experts would have you use some kind of thick "leather effect" paint that nobody can find anywhere, except maybe online for a high price, plus shipping. Then, using the paint for the first time, you may not get it on evenly the first time, which may require stripping and starting over (Oops,there goes the plastic strip). 

Using tape is very easy. First buy a 2" roll of 3M/Scotch brand tape. I have had my roll for about 20 years and am still using it. Next, divide the roof into 3 sections, using a ruler and mark it front and back. Apply the two sides first, pressing the tape down good with your fingers, a Q-tip and a square to round toothpick. Start with a new #11 blade and cut slowly once, around the edges of the chrome trim on most models.

Next, cut the middle section about 1/16" wider than is needed on both sides (this will require a ruler and a hard surface such as a cutting board, which most of us use on our workbench,  and is sold at Michaels or Hobby Lobby). Make sure that the surface is clean and free of any specs of dirt, paint, or other trash as the tape will pick up anything on the surfance and then it will show under your vinyl top. Overlap the edges of the middle section 1/16" on each side and you're done except for paint (no plastic strip needed!). I use a generic flat black paint and then give it a light coat or sprits of clear lacquer after to give it a bit of sheen.

I do apply round rod 0.030" to the bottom of the "B" pillar so it is important to be careful when applying glue in a thin bead. You can still sand it out before painting if glue is misapplied.  Then simply foil the rod after paint. It takes maybe two hours tops and is a great method! 

Here's one from about 15 years ago, an award winner, 1967 Chevy Chevelle. No lift! Thanks for looking and I hope this helps!

 

 

Very nice work!

 

I will offer my opnion of using tape for vinyl tops though.

 

What worries me about using masking tape for vinyl tops comes from my direct experience from leaving masking tape on the surface of a model for an extended period of time.

The adhesive inevitably dries out and the tape becomes extremely brittle and dry eventually curling up and flaking.

I would imagine that paint over the top of the tape, (depending upon the porous properties of the particular paint you use) might mitigate this reaction to some extent, but it scares me enough that I don't use it for this type of application.

 

To address your concerns about using plastic stock and paint, I'll offer this.

The seams are easily replicated with thin styrene stock applied with liquid cement. (no glue squeeze out).

The textured top is also easily replicated with plain old flat black, (or whatever your color of choice) spray paint, shot from a distance. (no oddball paints required)

A sheen can then be accomplished simply by rubbing the surface of the paint with your fingers.

The oil from your hands, and the rubbing, creates an extremely relistic vinyl like sheen.

As a matter of fact, it's my opinion that most of those "texture paints" and masking tape for that matter, are too highly textured for 1/25th scale.

My opinion is that lightly textured spray paint gives the most realistic, in scale look.

 

Again, just my opinion. Smile

 

 

 

 

Steve

 

 

  • Member since
    March 2006
  • From: Spring, Tx
Posted by modelcarjr on Tuesday, May 5, 2020 9:59 PM

Thanks, Steve! I appreciate your comments! I just disagree and that's OK. We are all different and that is what makes it fun. 

Here are my points:

  1. As I mentioned in my post I have never had tape peel or flake and I have some that are 15-20 years old. If I stored them outside in the hot and humid Houston weather, it probably would peel. But I store my models in plastic cases in my air-conditioned house.  I paint it with a generic flat black which could be rubbed out with fingers to provide a sheen as well. I just prefer to use a light coat of clear to preserve my skin oil. I guess it comes down to the word "inevitably". If you drip water on a rock, inevitably it will break. It may take 1000 years but it will break. 
  2. I have never used liquid styrene glue nor do I use model glue. I think I tried liquid styrene glue once but I may have been too inexperienced at the time. I couldn't get it to stick and just ended up with glue on my hands. I only use medium Extreme Power CA (bought at Hobby Lobby with a 40% coupon) or Elmers Glue-All for bumpers or license plates or Clear Parts Cement for windows. 
  3. On a real car, I think, there are sheets of vinyl that are applied with a thin adhesive of some sort. Its a covering that is applied to the metal top. I think an adhesive tape fits that bill and it doesn't look out of scale to me. .
  4. Your 442 is beatiful, no doubt. But when I blow up the picture I see textured paint on the top. I haven't mastered that "spraying from a distance" technique.  What distance? 2 feet? 5 feet? What happens when you don't like what it looks like or you mess it up? With tape, if you cut it wrong or wrinkle it in application, you can just pull it off and start again. 

So thanks for your comments and I am glad we could have this discussion. I hope other will try both methods and pick the one they like. Cool

If you cannot have a good time, what kinda time can you have? JR

Next on the bench:  Another 1970 Hemi 'Cuda, 1958 Chevy Impala, 1987 Buick GNX, 1950 Chevy Pick-up, Indy Reynard, 1965 Corvette, probably not in this order.

  • Member since
    May 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Wednesday, May 6, 2020 1:06 AM

modelcarjr

Thanks, Steve! I appreciate your comments! I just disagree and that's OK. We are all different and that is what makes it fun. 

Here are my points:

  1. As I mentioned in my post I have never had tape peel or flake and I have some that are 15-20 years old. If I stored them outside in the hot and humid Houston weather, it probably would peel. But I store my models in plastic cases in my air-conditioned house.  I paint it with a generic flat black which could be rubbed out with fingers to provide a sheen as well. I just prefer to use a light coat of clear to preserve my skin oil. I guess it comes down to the word "inevitably". If you drip water on a rock, inevitably it will break. It may take 1000 years but it will break. 
  2. I have never used liquid styrene glue nor do I use model glue. I think I tried liquid styrene glue once but I may have been too inexperienced at the time. I couldn't get it to stick and just ended up with glue on my hands. I only use medium Extreme Power CA (bought at Hobby Lobby with a 40% coupon) or Elmers Glue-All for bumpers or license plates or Clear Parts Cement for windows. 
  3. On a real car, I think, there are sheets of vinyl that are applied with a thin adhesive of some sort. Its a covering that is applied to the metal top. I think an adhesive tape fits that bill and it doesn't look out of scale to me. .
  4. Your 442 is beatiful, no doubt. But when I blow up the picture I see textured paint on the top. I haven't mastered that "spraying from a distance" technique.  What distance? 2 feet? 5 feet? What happens when you don't like what it looks like or you mess it up? With tape, if you cut it wrong or wrinkle it in application, you can just pull it off and start again. 

So thanks for your comments and I am glad we could have this discussion. I hope other will try both methods and pick the one they like. Cool

 

Try some Plastistruct "Plastic Weld" sometime.

I think you will like it.

 

Apparently, a good number of people see something other than textured paint on the vinyl tops that I have done.

I get asked quite frequently at shows how I make them look so realistic.

Excuse me for saying so, but in my opinion, in order for a 1/25th scale vinyl top to look realistic, the texture should be very diffucult to pick out with the naked eye without being right on top of it.

That's what I mean when I say "out of scale".

Plus the fact that a real vinyl top is more "granular", unlike the texture of masking tape.

This is all that I'm saying.

 

 

 

 

This example is precisely why I shy away from vinyl tops recreated with tape.

 

 

 

 

 

Steve

 

  • Member since
    March 2006
  • From: Spring, Tx
Posted by modelcarjr on Wednesday, May 6, 2020 7:31 AM

Thanks, Steve! You're right - not all vinyl tops looks the same. But some do have a wrinkle pattern to them. I guess those are the ones I remember having owned a couple of them. Maybe it depends on year, make and model, I don't know.

I prefer to use the tape because it is easier for me. I also have had a lot of inquiries on this site and at model contests about how I do my vinyl tops.  I might lose a little fidelity but its OK. I am not an avid "at all costs replicate factory stock" guy.

I could buy some Plastistruct liquid glue online but then I have another inventory item to keep in stock. I'm a minimalist and prefer to have only what I need to build comfortably. I have a hard enough time keeping paint in stock. 

As for the model you illustrate, I agree that bad application leads to a bad look. What looks the worst is the chrome pen or paint application on the window trim. I wouldn't do that either. 

 Thanks for the discussion, Steve!  A lot of us wish we had your skills. Your work on the 442 was superb! 

 

If you cannot have a good time, what kinda time can you have? JR

Next on the bench:  Another 1970 Hemi 'Cuda, 1958 Chevy Impala, 1987 Buick GNX, 1950 Chevy Pick-up, Indy Reynard, 1965 Corvette, probably not in this order.

  • Member since
    May 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Wednesday, May 6, 2020 1:19 PM

modelcarjr

Thanks, Steve! You're right - not all vinyl tops looks the same. But some do have a wrinkle pattern to them. I guess those are the ones I remember having owned a couple of them. Maybe it depends on year, make and model, I don't know.

I prefer to use the tape because it is easier for me. I also have had a lot of inquiries on this site and at model contests about how I do my vinyl tops.  I might lose a little fidelity but its OK. I am not an avid "at all costs replicate factory stock" guy.

I could buy some Plastistruct liquid glue online but then I have another inventory item to keep in stock. I'm a minimalist and prefer to have only what I need to build comfortably. I have a hard enough time keeping paint in stock. 

As for the model you illustrate, I agree that bad application leads to a bad look. What looks the worst is the chrome pen or paint application on the window trim. I wouldn't do that either. 

 Thanks for the discussion, Steve!  A lot of us wish we had your skills. Your work on the 442 was superb! 

 

 

It's good that we can have civilized conversations on these matters.

It can only be beneficial to those that have yet to try a particular technique.

They can take the information absorbed from such discussions and use what works for them.

As they say, there's more than one way to skin a cat. Wink

 

I will add that if you have not tried a MEK based solvent cement, you might want to investigate them.

They are absolutely invaluable to me for certain tasks and I find myself using it more and more for bare plastic cementing tasks.

As an example, I believe that nothing I have tried could work nearly as well for a job such as the intake hoses I created for the '68 442 above.

Using a length of styrene tubing, I wrapped a thin piece of stretched sprue around it a couple of wraps at a time, and then cemented with a drop of MEK cement.

After holding it in place for a second or two, I continued with a couple more wraps, and so on.

I created both of these hoses in maybe a half an hour at the bench, something that would be difficult, even with CA glue.

 

I recommend this product highly for any time that you need to glue 2 pieces of bare plastic together quickly and it works exceedingly well for applying interior and body trim, including items such as vinyl top trim and seams.

 

 

 

 

Steve

 

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