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My next project - 1970 Torino GT

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  • Member since
    January, 2018
My next project - 1970 Torino GT
Posted by MikeFo on Thursday, February 22, 2018 8:22 AM

Hello Muscle fans,

 

This is my next project to start. The kit is really nice, with a lot of detail. I have promised myself that I am going to take my time and do a job as close to perfection as possible - tall order for me- and do the kit justice. I may even try to do some engine wiring, for the first time, and pay more attention to detail in the cockpit.

Wish me luck!

 

Building more muscle Automobile

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Thursday, February 22, 2018 10:20 AM

Very nice kit. I built one of these about ten years ago or so. It went together well, if I recall, though be very careful with the PE lattice for the tail light assembly. It is very delicate. This kit also has the nicest 385 series engine available in 1/25 scale. Enjoy the build.

Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
       - Antoine de Saint-Exepury

  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by MikeFo on Thursday, February 22, 2018 12:16 PM
Thanks for the tip Trevor. If you still have it, a pic would be nice?

Building more muscle Automobile

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Thursday, February 22, 2018 3:42 PM

MikeFo
If you still have it, a pic would be nice?

Cheers, I'll get a couple of pics posted, but I won't be able to get to it until next week.

I thought about posting a link to the original post on this forum, but all of my photos were on photobucket, so not much point in that.

Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
       - Antoine de Saint-Exepury

  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by MikeFo on Thursday, February 22, 2018 4:47 PM
Great! I look forward to it.

Building more muscle Automobile

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Nashua, New Hampshire
Posted by mrmike on Saturday, February 24, 2018 11:10 AM

I have this kit as well, along with the '70 Torino Cobra which is basically the same kit.  When I someday build it, my GT will be stock and the drag parts will go into the Cobra.  Looking forward to your build!

You had asked elsewhere that you are considering a 429 CobraJet for your Torino GT.  Externally the engine looks the same as a 429 ThunderJet (the stock 429 engine).  I believe the CobraJet benefitted from having forced air induction and extra goodies in the engine.  I think the Super CobraJet had force air induction, external oil cooler, and a Traction-Lok rear axle w/4:11 gears plus all the goodies inside the engine.

"That's Spenser with an 'S' like the poet." Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985

On my bench-1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria; Bullitt '68 Mustang GT

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by MikeFo on Monday, February 26, 2018 12:21 PM

Got started!

Primed and ready to paint. Going to go with a dark metallic green, called "British Green".

 

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  • Member since
    April, 2009
Posted by PotatoCam on Monday, February 26, 2018 4:15 PM

Looks like a good start, MikeFo. I've been considering adding this kit to my stash (because who am I kidding...when will I get around to building it, lol), so I'll be following this one. Carry on, sir!

 

PotatoCam

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Thursday, March 01, 2018 4:18 PM

 

MikeFo
Thanks for the tip Trevor. If you still have it, a pic would be nice?
 

Good start. The Torino will look great in a dark green. Something else to keep an eye out for; if I recall correctly, the rear end sits low when built straight from the box. A bit of mocking up might be in order if this is the type of thing that will bother you. The rear ride height is easily corrected, if you wish to.

I had some decent photos of my Torino taken back in the day, but for the life of me, I can't find them. So I snapped a couple of quick & dirty pics on the bench last night. I apologise for the poor quality and cluttered backdrop.

As you can see, I added a bit of 70s period rake and a few other minor mods.

Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
       - Antoine de Saint-Exepury

  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by MikeFo on Thursday, March 01, 2018 6:05 PM

Looks good Trevor. I think I will leave the stripe off mine. A friend of mine owned one of these in the late 70's. Was dark metallic green, with no stripe. I may forego the nostalgia aspect and put it on. We'll see.If I remember correctly, his car did sit low in the back.I have not decided if I want to go with the stock tires, or wider rears. If I do, them I'm sure I'll have to raise the back.

Building more muscle Automobile

  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by MikeFo on Friday, March 02, 2018 1:12 PM

So, I little progress.

I have been reluctant to paint the body with color and clear just yet, as it is still a bit cool in my basement, about 55 deg. f., so I have been doing some engine work.

A couple things:

first, I followed directions and painted the exhaust manifolds "Gunmetal", which looks mostly just dark grey, so I'm thinking of doing a light blotting with Aluminum and Rust. Any comment on that?

 

second, the custom air cleaner does not have a base, so looks like the filter is hanging from the top cover, so I am thinking of obtaining a small plastic washer with O.D. just about the same as the cover, so it overlaps the bottom of the filter a bit and paint it chrome before gluing. I hope will look OK.

 

'til next update..........

Building more muscle Automobile

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Monday, March 05, 2018 7:44 AM

Good work so far, Mike. The engine looks good. I would say that any street driven car with cast iron mainifolds, a little rust will be in order. I agree that the air cleaner should have a lower piece. That problem is far too common in kits.

Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
       - Antoine de Saint-Exepury

  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by MikeFo on Monday, March 05, 2018 1:06 PM

Thanks for your input Trevor.

Still looking for the right washer, but a little more progress on the engine.

 

Also was able to get some coats of color on the body. Turned out a bit darker than I imagined, but I like the color.

I think I'll have to do some wet sanding of the color before I do the clear, as I had some drips and other issues. Not very good at the painting, unfortunately. I did three light coats, with 20 min intervals, but still the paint ran. Also, some edges did not cover well. Not sure why that happens.

Maybe because I used Model Masters color paint over Tamiya primer? Who knows.

Anywhoo, here's some pics.

Building more muscle Automobile

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Tuesday, March 06, 2018 7:43 AM

I really like the colour. It looks a lot like black jade. Sorry to hear about the paint problems. Model Master paint is compatible with Tamiya primer, so no issues there. What do you use for thinning the Model Master paint? I'm crap at paint, too, so I find that polishing is my friend.

Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
       - Antoine de Saint-Exepury

  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by MikeFo on Tuesday, March 06, 2018 10:00 AM

It is a shaker can and I do a lot of shaking. I guess I have my work cut out for me with sanding and polishing.

Do you do any wet sanding between color and clear coats?

I was hoping that I would not have to, as I have read that other modelers do not. Perhaps they are using paint guns. One of these days, I may invest in one.

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  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by MikeFo on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 8:09 AM

This is, without doubt, the most frustrating thing I've ever tried to do!

Arrrgh!!

Building more muscle Automobile

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 8:57 AM

MikeFo
Do you do any wet sanding between color and clear coats?

The only time I would do any wet sanding between colour and clear is if there are any chunks of junk or wayward mosquitoes in the paint, or other serious surface blemished such as major orange peel or other roughness. Also, keep in mind that metallic colours should not be wet sanded directly. Doing so exposes the raw bits of metallic flake which is not a good look. If you have to do some wet sanding to repair the paint before clear, the usual course of action with metallic paints is to give one last light colour coat after the repair, then apply clear once that cures.

Actually, I rarely use clear. In fact, I only use clear when painting metallics, and then the only reason I use it is so I can polish the finish. Coincidentally, my '70 Torino model is an unusual exception. It is clear coated over black. Using Future as a clear coat was getting a lot press at the time and I thought I would give it a shot. I'll not use future as a clear coat again.

As for the frustration of engine wiring, it gets easier with experience. There are many different ways (techniques and materials) to go about engine wiring, with the preferences being a personal thing. You may even want to try pre-wired distributors. Personally I don't care for them, preferring the authentic appearance and zen like experience of doing the job myself, but very many model builders accept and use pre-wired.

Despite the frustration, yours is coming along nicely, though the wire material seems a bit thick. This can add to the frustration, the thicker material being more difficult to handle on a small package such as a 1/25 scale engine. In any event, things are looking good.

Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
       - Antoine de Saint-Exepury

  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by MikeFo on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 11:07 AM

Hi Trevor,

thanks for the advice and the pep talk. I'll certainly follow it for the paint work and I'll keep plugging away at the wiring (no pun intended). I too want to do the job myself, as it seems like cheating to buy the pre-wired, however, I did not mold the kit from scratch, so, who's to say?

I got the wire from some phone line cable that I took apart and seemed like an appropriate size. Does not bend easily though, but fits over the nubs on the distributor. Also, does not stick well to the glue. Maybe I'll search for an alternative material.

May also get fed up and buy the pre-wiredBig Smile

 

Cheers!

Mike

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  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by MikeFo on Friday, March 16, 2018 9:34 AM

So, after a botched attempt at plug wiring, I have put the motor aside, until I decide how I want to approach it again. Clearly, I need to get a tiny drill and find a more appropriate wire to use. What I had, was flexible, but did not want to stay bent. I may just buy the pre-wired, although that would admit defeat. I'm a stubborn old cur Big Smile

 

In the mean time, I did some painting of the small parts for the chassis and the interior. As I mentioned earlier, I wanted to do the kit justice, blah, blah, blah, so I attempted to paint the chrome on the interior doors / side panels.

I read about a techniqe, (on this forum, I think) where you paint with clear following masking, to prevent bleed through of the sprayed color onto masked areas you dont want it to go. I first painted the panels with flat black, let dry, and painted with chrome into the recessed "chrome" lines. After drying, I then covered the chrome places with very thin masking (Testors), a very tedious process, mind you, and sprayed with clear. I waited about 20 mins and sprayed with the flat black. I let it dry overnight and removed the masking the following day. Below is result.

Not too happy with the result, as the chrome is a bit blotchy. I suppose that the masking glue pulled some up. Perhaps I should have not sprayed flat black first, or maybe a coat of clear before masking? Also, it looks like the black shrunk over the clear. I don't mind this aspect though, as it gives it a somewhat textured leather look.

Any comments, suggestions and constructive criticisms are welcome.

Building more muscle Automobile

  • Member since
    March, 2006
  • From: Spring, Tx
Posted by modelcarjr on Friday, March 16, 2018 10:26 AM

Mike, I think the method that you are referring to would be good to prevent bleed-through on two-tone interiors or bodies but probably not for the interior chrome trim pieces. What I normally do with a black interior is paint flat black and then give the door panels and other pieces a light coat of clear. That does two things, it give the doors a semi-gloss look and helps with applying Bare Metal Foil. I always use BMF on the interior door trim cutting in strips and then trimming. It takes a little experience to apply but if the surface is smooth due to the clear it goes on pretty well and can be fixed by peeling it off and trying again. For me, it is a lot easier than the tedious taping around the trim and it looks pretty realistic when finished. Just a suggestion.

If you cannot have a good time, what kinda time can you have? JR

Next on the bench:  Another 1970 Hemi 'Cuda, 1958 Chevy Impala, 1987 Buick GNX, 1950 Chevy Pick-up, Indy Reynard, 1965 Corvette, probably not in this order.

  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by MikeFo on Friday, March 16, 2018 12:37 PM
Thanks jr, I may try that. It can't be any more tedious than doing the thin masking, although I have some, I have not worked with it yet. I was also thinking of getting one of those chrome pens that I read about here that some folks use. The one mm thickness might do the trick, if I don't shake too much, that is.

Building more muscle Automobile

  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by MikeFo on Tuesday, March 20, 2018 8:47 AM

So, I'm back,

 

Finished the interior. Turned out OK. Eventually just touched up the chrome on the doors. Tried monkeying with the foil, but just got frustrated. Takes a steady hand to work with that stuff.

 

Building more muscle Automobile

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Tuesday, March 20, 2018 10:53 AM

The interior looks good, Mike. I really like the photo-reduced magazine on the seat. Nice touch.

Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
       - Antoine de Saint-Exepury

  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by MikeFo on Tuesday, March 20, 2018 12:16 PM

Thanks Trevor.

Can't take credit for the mag though. Stold the idea from someone on this site Big Smile

It is a cover from 1970 though.

 

Building more muscle Automobile

  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by MikeFo on Wednesday, March 21, 2018 4:59 PM

Picked up some goodies today for doing wiring and hoses, etc. Can't wait to get started Stick out tongue

 

Now all I need is a drill and some bits!

Building more muscle Automobile

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Nashua, New Hampshire
Posted by mrmike on Wednesday, March 21, 2018 7:44 PM

Mike, forget the drill and get yourself a pinvise!  The drill is big and bulky making it difficult to use on a small plastic item.  The pinvise is small enough and far more controllable to use!

"That's Spenser with an 'S' like the poet." Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985

On my bench-1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria; Bullitt '68 Mustang GT

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by MikeFo on Wednesday, March 21, 2018 9:09 PM

Hi Mike,

Yes, I did get a pin vise and a few various size drill bits. Started doing the plug wiring tonight. Going ok. I'll post a pic when done. I picked up the engine detailing booklet from this site and am following that.

Good fun!

Building more muscle Automobile

  • Member since
    February, 2008
Posted by justmike on Wednesday, March 21, 2018 11:10 PM

Nice interior. If you can master the BMF you will never use siver paint for trim again. 

Feelings are like scents: The more they are analyzed, the worse they smell.
  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by MikeFo on Thursday, March 22, 2018 12:41 PM

Thanks Mike,

I plan to try BMF again on the body chrome. Hopefully, with better results.

Building more muscle Automobile

  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by MikeFo on Friday, March 23, 2018 8:09 AM

Finished up the plug wiring. Muuch easier with the right materials and tools.

Just a little paint touch up to do and gas line from pump to carb and I think I'll call the engine done. Oh, can't forget to drill holes for heater hoses. I suspect will be much easier to do prior to installing engine into chassis.

Building more muscle Automobile

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