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Model brand choices for muscle cars

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  • Member since
    November, 2014
Model brand choices for muscle cars
Posted by FerrariJack on Wednesday, November 19, 2014 11:04 AM

Hi Guys, 

I have primarily built exotic/super/race modern cars with Tamiya kits.   I have been watching a lot of the Velocity channel lately and watching shows like graveyard carz and overhaulin.  

Lets just say I really want to build some classic muscle cars now.

Are there any other kit manufactures to choose from other than Revell/Monogram?   Moving from Tamiya kits to Revell is going to be a pain, but if that's my only choice I'll deal with it.

I cant wait to start building some hemi's!    I just hope this doesn't lead to me actually buying a real muscle car in real life.   Especially since the Mecum auctions come to my city every year!

  • Member since
    July, 2010
  • From: Houston Tx
Posted by Mopar-D on Wednesday, November 19, 2014 1:34 PM

JoHan had a lot of MOPARs that show up on eBay

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Wednesday, November 19, 2014 1:45 PM

Yes, AMT produced many great muscle car kits, including the catalogue of MPC kits of which Round 2 (AMT, MPC, et al) is the current custodian. Some of their older tooling may not be up the level of precision that you are used to with Tamiya, but great models can be made from them. AMT tooling from the 90s remains state of the art for cars of this genre.

If there is a particular kit you are wondering about, or if there is a particular car you want a kit of, ask the forum and we'll point you in the right direction.

Que the Vikings: "Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam ..."

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, November 19, 2014 3:31 PM

IMHO some of the best muscle car kits out there are the AMT ones issued about 10 to 15 years ago.  These would include the 71 Charger and Duster, 68 Roadrunner, 66 Olds 442 and the 70 Camaro plus others.. The detail is top notch and they fit together really well.  AMT also designed them with a lot of locator tabs and pins so they are easier to built.

I find the newer pure Revell kits, like the 69 Charger, are alway a bit more challenging.   The detail level is usually fantastic but the parts fit always seems to need some tweaking and they are not over generous with positive locking mechanisms like pins and tabs. Often times I'm really excited when I open the box and by the time I'm done with it I almost hate it. Always dry fit as many parts as you can and be prepared to use some patience.  That said, they can be built into fantastic models.

There are no pure Monogram kits anymore except older ones through ebay and swap meets.  Revell has reissued a lot of these kits under their own name like the 69 Superbee.  Compared to the true Revel kits which are always 1/25 these are usually 1/24 scale though the box may say otherwise.  Overall they are easy to build with good fitting parts and tabs and pins.  However, the detail is not as good as the best AMT and Revell kits especially under the hood and chassis.

Kind of the bottom of the barrel are some of the older AMT and MPC kits issued when the cars were new. They are pretty promo like with molded in chassis and metal axles.  However, for some cars you really want to build they are all that is available and painted and detailed they can make great shelf models.

  • Member since
    July, 2005
Posted by Snake45 on Wednesday, November 19, 2014 3:54 PM

Yeah, ask about particular subjects you're interested in and we'll steer you in the right direction.

Recovering aircraft modeler. "I can see me bound and gagged

Dragged behind the clownmobile...."

--Warren Zevon, "Hostage-O," Life'll Kill Ya, Artemis Record 2000

  • Member since
    November, 2014
Posted by FerrariJack on Wednesday, November 19, 2014 3:56 PM

I think the first muscle car I really want to build is a 1970-71  Plymouth Hemi Cuda.   What do you guys think of the 1/25 Revell kit?   It seems like it is a newer one?

also are there any common household items that you can use for distributor cap cables?  i dont want to get into expensive aftermarket parts.    I've never actually tried it, but though about painting tiny copper wire that comes out of small cables laying around the house, like eat bud cables?   any ideas on if that would work?

  • Member since
    July, 2005
Posted by Snake45 on Wednesday, November 19, 2014 4:30 PM

The new Revell '70 Cuda is very nice. If you want a '71, the Monogram 1/24 kit, though 30+ years old, still builds up into a fine looking model. DO stay away from both of Revell's wretched backbirth attempts at the '70 AAR Cuda. They're both awful, the first much worse than the second.

Recovering aircraft modeler. "I can see me bound and gagged

Dragged behind the clownmobile...."

--Warren Zevon, "Hostage-O," Life'll Kill Ya, Artemis Record 2000

  • Member since
    March, 2006
  • From: Spring, Tx
Posted by modelcarjr on Thursday, November 20, 2014 5:42 AM

I agree with Snake, the Revell 70 Hemi Cuda is an excellent kit and several SA articles have been written about the kit. The Monogram which has been relabeled as a Revell kit is 1/24th and has less detail. For example if you want a master brake cylinder with booster or windshield wipers you will have to add them from the parts box. The latest offering by Revell of the 70 Cuda has much more detail.  As for plug wire I like Morgan Automotive pre-wired distributors which can be purchased from ScalemodelingbyChris for $5.95, plus shipping. You can choose wire and cap color. Although it may be more expense it sure saves a lit of time and they look great once installed. I haven't been able to find the 70 Hemi Cuda on the shelves of retailers like Michaels or HobbyLobby so you'll probably have to mail order. Here is a pic of both engine bay shots with MAD pre-wired distributors:

If you cannot have a good time, what kinda time can you have? JR

Next on the bench:  Another 1970 Hemi 'Cuda, 1958 Chevy Impala, 1987 Buick GNX, 1950 Chevy Pick-up, Indy Reynard, 1965 Corvette, probably not in this order.

  • Member since
    February, 2014
Posted by SlowMoSlam on Thursday, November 20, 2014 7:55 AM

I usually scavenge wiring out of telephone cords, or T1 lines, along with broken electronics.  Of course when you go this route you'll need a pin vice and a set of tiny drill bits. Depending on how often you plan on using plug wires in your builds it may be better to go the pre wired way.

  • Member since
    November, 2013
  • From: Atlanta
Posted by Sev-Tai on Tuesday, November 25, 2014 7:52 PM

Keeping within the same lines of the thread, would the old MPC '74 Cuda or the AMT snapfast kits be viable as bases to build from or are they inaccurate as well?

  • Member since
    February, 2014
Posted by SlowMoSlam on Thursday, November 27, 2014 8:05 PM

I can't answer your question Sev, but I'm certain there are folks on here that can.  I've never been a "exact replica" kind of guy.  I just build with little to no care about 1:1 accuracy, which may be heresy to folks on here, I like the plumbing and wiring side of realism, without any concern for the models accurate depiction of the actual car/truck.  Once again, Slomo is no help!

  • Member since
    November, 2013
  • From: Atlanta
Posted by Sev-Tai on Friday, November 28, 2014 12:22 AM

Eh, I'm not too big on details either, but I'd heard something about how one of the Cuda kits had the completely wrong shape on part of it.  ^^;

  • Member since
    May, 2011
Posted by MIKE1017 on Saturday, November 29, 2014 7:16 AM

members.fotki.com/.../about   Tim Boyds Fotki site has quite a few kit reviews

The only easy day was yesterday.

  • Member since
    December, 2011
  • From: Central Pennsylvania
Posted by Dodge_Driver on Saturday, November 29, 2014 11:05 AM

Sev-Tai

Keeping within the same lines of the thread, would the old MPC '74 Cuda or the AMT snapfast kits be viable as bases to build from or are they inaccurate as well?

I have built the MPC 'Cuda and the Snapfast appears to be a variation of the MPC kit. I think the entire chassis is crude and inaccurate and the rear bumper looks wrong to me. That being said, either would be fine if 100 percent accuracy isn't a concern.

More a model starter than a model builder!

Planned Builds: '78 Dodge Sweptline street machine; Revell '69 Charger-440/6spd/18" wheels; Monogram '32 Ford Highboy.

  • Member since
    November, 2013
  • From: Atlanta
Posted by Sev-Tai on Saturday, November 29, 2014 12:40 PM

Cool, thanks for the links & info.

To be honest? I doubt I'd use the chassis off it in favor of something with more detail, but I absolutely SUCK at fabrication so I really just need the body & whatever else from the kit that might look good in it. :)

  • Member since
    December, 2011
  • From: Central Pennsylvania
Posted by Dodge_Driver on Saturday, November 29, 2014 1:37 PM

I still have my old MPC builtup from years ago...It is in pieces now and some parts may be missing...you are welcome to have whatever I can find of it. I'll dig it out and give you the details if you're interested.Smile

More a model starter than a model builder!

Planned Builds: '78 Dodge Sweptline street machine; Revell '69 Charger-440/6spd/18" wheels; Monogram '32 Ford Highboy.

  • Member since
    August, 2014
Posted by Sparkmaster75 on Friday, December 12, 2014 7:16 PM
Plug wires can be made from small wires found in ear buds etc. I bought a roll of 30 gage wire from radio shack to us as plug wires. The only drawback is color. It only comes in red blue and white. You can cut off lengths and drag them through a black sharpie to get black wires if thats what you want. It's approximately the same as the after market wire, you get more than the couple feet you get from the after market for about the same price or less.
  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by Oldcarfan27 on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 12:07 AM

FYI - I recently took the snap-fast plus Cuda (the yellow one) and tried improving the detail on it. I found out that the AMT 70 Challenger chassis - when shortened slightly, fits the Cuda body perfectly! In fact, if you use the original issue, molded in yellow, it'll look like you're using one kit that was designed that way. I took the underhood fender wells from the Challenger, carefully cut out the hood of the Cuda and easily made the engine area for the curbside kit into a decent model. With a little thought,  everything fits like it's supposed to and it looks better than the original MPC kit! And the body has better proportions than the old Monogram Kit.

It looks smaller than the new Revell kit, so I don't know which kit is true 1/25 scale. It may be fun to bash with the old Johan 71 Cuda, or parts from the "bad" Revell AAR Cuda to make variations in the same scale.

It's a creative way to make a bad kit better! And you haven't ruined any rare valuable kits to do it.

BTW - When was the last time the MPC 74 Cuda kit was reissued?  It may be time for that one to come back on the shelves. The last time I can remember, was back in the early 80s (1982?) as the Hemi Cuda and it was molded in dark blue.

 

"I keep trying to complete my junkyard diorama, but everytime I add more clunkers, I get the nagging urge to pull them out and restore them!!!

Romans 3:23-25

John 14:6-7

 

  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by Oldcarfan27 on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 12:13 AM

Dodge_Driver

 

 
Sev-Tai

Keeping within the same lines of the thread, would the old MPC '74 Cuda or the AMT snapfast kits be viable as bases to build from or are they inaccurate as well?

 

 

 

I have built the MPC 'Cuda and the Snapfast appears to be a variation of the MPC kit. I think the entire chassis is crude and inaccurate and the rear bumper looks wrong to me. That being said, either would be fine if 100 percent accuracy isn't a concern.

 

 

FYI - I recently took the snap-fast plus Cuda (the yellow one) and tried improving the detail on it. I found out that the AMT 70 Challenger chassis - when shortened slightly, fits the Cuda body perfectly! In fact, if you use the original issue, molded in yellow, it'll look like you're using one kit that was designed that way. I took the underhood fender wells from the Challenger, carefully cut out the hood of the Cuda and easily made the engine area for the curbside kit into a decent model. With a little thought,  everything fits like it's supposed to and it looks better than the original MPC kit! And the body has better proportions than the old Monogram Kit.

It looks smaller than the new Revell kit, so I don't know which kit is true 1/25 scale. It may be fun to bash with the old Johan 71 Cuda, or parts from the "bad" Revell AAR Cuda to make variations in the same scale.

It's a creative way to make a bad kit better! And you haven't ruined any rare valuable kits to do it.

BTW - When was the last time the MPC 74 Cuda kit was reissued?  It may be time for that one to come back on the shelves. The last time I can remember, was back in the early 80s (1982?) as the Hemi Cuda and it was molded in dark blue.

"I keep trying to complete my junkyard diorama, but everytime I add more clunkers, I get the nagging urge to pull them out and restore them!!!

Romans 3:23-25

John 14:6-7

 

  • Member since
    September, 2007
  • From: Melbourne, Fl.
Posted by rickr442 on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 2:07 AM

The body of the Snap Kit '74 may be the best body of the bunch, because it was originally a dealer promo. Chrysler came to the market late with those E-bodies, the market changed and sales plummeted so they didn't change any of the styling for the last three model years. The Snapper's flat hood made it look like a rent-a-car.

 

www.fueledbythefallen.com

'Peggy, call the insurance agent... The cars got some bullet holes!'..... Joe Mannix

Yeah, but half an inch to the right, he woulda missed me altogether!'.....Jim Rockford

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