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K & S sanding film.

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  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Fallon, Nv.
K & S sanding film.
Posted by helipilot16 on Wednesday, July 04, 2007 6:22 PM
I bought several assortments of Flex-I-Grit sanding film from Micro Mark. They are each a different color, but there are no markings spelling out the grits of each. Ther is nothing on or in the package that would help. Some of them are obviously finer than others, but I would like to eliminate the guesswork.

Does anyone have any idea of the grit/color relationship? The K & S website was no help.

Marcus A. Pryor

Most people are as happy as they choose to be

 

 

 

  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Thomasville, Ga.
Posted by FreightTrain on Wednesday, July 04, 2007 9:33 PM
Thats funny cause I got a package of the K&S sandpaper many years ago and never did use it cause I can't for the life of me figure the grit & colors! I have try everything include writing them and still nothing!
Maybe someone in here knows?
The Flex-l-grit stuff is usually clear about the sizes and they do have a web-site.

Jeff
~ Jeff Scott ~ "Have You Driven A Ford ... Lately?"
  • Member since
    March, 2007
  • From: SOUTH FLORIDUH
Posted by MikeMc on Friday, July 06, 2007 8:43 AM
get out a good (10x) magnifier... you can see which is rougher!

HANG UP AND DRIVE........ Mike

  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Fallon, Nv.
Posted by helipilot16 on Friday, July 06, 2007 11:28 AM
Good idea!! I'll try it.

Marcus A. Pryor

Most people are as happy as they choose to be

 

 

 

  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Thomasville, Ga.
Posted by FreightTrain on Friday, July 06, 2007 5:40 PM
Helipilot16, I finally remembered a few things about the K&N sandpaper, I got it sometime back in the late '70s and it was the only finest sandpaper that was available for model kits back then and the hobby shop owner told me it was for polishing the metal that K&N sells..brass & aluminum would have a chrome like finish if you started with the paper on top and work your way to the last one in the back...never did figure out the grits and I even wrote K&N about it, they sended me some chart that was wrote in German or something! The packages I got were in a clear plastic bag with red & white colors.
I have many grits of sandpaper/clothes to 15,000 and it looks like the K&N grits start at somewhere around 1-2 thousand to 6 maybe?
Its too fine to see much of any difference between grits but sure would maybe put a nice smooth finish on a model car using wet sanding techniques before the last coat of paint. It does a great job of polishing the tubing tho!
Wish could help more.
~ Jeff ~
~ Jeff Scott ~ "Have You Driven A Ford ... Lately?"
  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Fallon, Nv.
Posted by helipilot16 on Friday, July 06, 2007 5:52 PM
Mine were also in a red and white bag. I have guessed on the grits and have found they work great for color sanding. I agree the finest are somewhere around 6-8,000 grit.

Marcus A. Pryor

Most people are as happy as they choose to be

 

 

 

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, July 07, 2007 5:27 PM
Throw it away. Go to an auto paint supply shop and get several grades of wet & dry paper. It's marked on the package and on the back of the paper.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Fallon, Nv.
Posted by helipilot16 on Saturday, July 07, 2007 7:48 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Lee in Texas

Throw it away. Go to an auto paint supply shop and get several grades of wet & dry paper. It's marked on the package and on the back of the paper.


They don't carry anything anywhere near fine enough. Super fine grit to them is about 600.

Marcus A. Pryor

Most people are as happy as they choose to be

 

 

 

  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Thomasville, Ga.
Posted by FreightTrain on Sunday, July 08, 2007 12:08 AM
You have to be careful with that Auto grade sandpaper..its too stiff and you might end up cutting into the paint or worse...letting the paper soak for a while before using helps a lot.
I do use the 3M 800, 1,000 and higher grit for wet sanding primer before painting. Anything less than 800 is asking for trouble.

I enjoy using the polishing kit sanding cloths & pads..soft enough not to cut into paint and able to get into places where paper can't without damaging the finish. My favorite last sanding job is done with 3,200 grit. Others may go higher but 3,200 is good enough for me. A shine no clear coat can beat!
* Jeff *
~ Jeff Scott ~ "Have You Driven A Ford ... Lately?"
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, July 09, 2007 4:43 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by helipilot16


They don't carry anything anywhere near fine enough. Super fine grit to them is about 600.


If you need finer than 600, you'd probably be better off with a polishing kit.
  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Canberra, Australia
Posted by aussiemuscle308 on Monday, July 09, 2007 7:26 PM
you could get Micromark's flexible sanding squares. they have a 'kit' with grits of 2000 4000, 6000, 8000 and 12000. they also have sanding cloths in these grits which are also useful.

edit: http://www.ares-server.com/Ares/Ares.asp?MerchantID=RET01229&Action=Catalog&Type=Product&ID=81601
  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Fallon, Nv.
Posted by helipilot16 on Monday, July 09, 2007 10:12 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by aussiemuscle308

you could get Micromark's flexible sanding squares. they have a 'kit' with grits of 2000 4000, 6000, 8000 and 12000. they also have sanding cloths in these grits which are also useful.

edit: http://www.ares-server.com/Ares/Ares.asp?MerchantID=RET01229&Action=Catalog&Type=Product&ID=81601


This is hilarious!! (sorry, aussiemuscle, but I couldn't help myself). Those kits are what started this topic!! The Micromark kits are K & S sanding film. My question was (and still is): How do you tell which is which grit? There is no indication on the package or on the sheets which is which, and if you tell me you can tell the difference, I say you're dreamin'.

As for the one who thinks that 600 grit is fine, I have to disagree with you. 600 grit is the coarsest I use, and that only for when I have to remove lots of plastic.

Marcus A. Pryor

Most people are as happy as they choose to be

 

 

 

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, July 09, 2007 11:43 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Lee in Texas

Throw it away. Go to an auto paint supply shop and get several grades of wet & dry paper. It's marked on the package and on the back of the paper.


Why throw away a perfectly good pack of sanding films that go adequately fine?

There was another thread somewhere that had some help regarding this. From experience and a microscope I have decided to use them in this order (coarse to fine): grey, tan, black, white, green. But I could still be wrong. Even so, it does the job, and you won't see scratches after. The black is quite fine, and the green is ridiculous.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Fallon, Nv.
Posted by helipilot16 on Tuesday, July 10, 2007 12:29 AM
That will be a big help. I have been using the gray to start with and finishing with the green. I guess I wasn't far off. The other colors are more difficult, however, and your advice helps. Thanks

Marcus A. Pryor

Most people are as happy as they choose to be

 

 

 

  • Member since
    May, 2018
Posted by Somedude on Friday, May 18, 2018 1:39 PM

Accroding to the customer support at K&S:

 

 

Sanding Film Regular Assortment (Grit)
150 Silicon Carbide – Coarse – Black
280 Garnet – Medium – Orange
320 Silicon Carbide – Fine – Gray
400 Aluminum Oxide – Extra Fine – Tan
600 Aluminum Oxide – Ultra Fine – Red

 

 

 

Micro Assortment (In Microns)
23 Silicon Carbide – Medium – Dark Grey
23 Aluminum Oxide – Medium – Light Grey
8 Silicon Carbide – Fine – Black
1.5 Cerium Oxide – Extra Fine – Taupe
.5 Chromium Oxide – Ultra Fine -- Green

 

 

 


And also by color:
Dark Grey --   44 micron & silicon carbide
Black -- 8 micron & silicon carbide
Tan (Darker, but transparent) -- 1.5 micron   caruim oxide
Tan (lighter, but translucent/opaque) -- 23 micron & aluminum oxide
Dark Green --  .5 micron   chromium oxide

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Friday, May 18, 2018 9:11 PM

I was given some of these fine grits many years ago and to me it seemed like over-kill in fineness.

Paint needs a surface to grip to and not be TOO SMOOTH.

I've painted enough 1 - 1 cars in the past to have established a process that works great on both full size cars and models. Not that dis-similar

My final grit is wet or dry 800 sandpaper that I use dry, and that always helps prep the surface to give me a paint job I'm always happy with.

MyMy 2 Cents

Love Velocity channel, Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I learn so much there.

 

 

                                     

 

 

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