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Create your own windshield!

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  • Member since
    April, 2004
  • From: generally earth
Posted by notlezah on Friday, July 14, 2006 12:21 AM
Try this one:
http://www.squadron.com/reviews/review-sq9003.htm
the must have updated the site...Smile,Wink, & Grin
I am Howard, Jack of all trades,Master of none...current projects: Diorama-->60's gas station, Post WWIII PerriPeekaboo...See my stuff here: http://public.fotki.com/notlezah/ Simple rules. Have you read them? http://www.scaleautomag.com/sca/community/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=7502
  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Mornington Peninsula, Victoria, Australia
Posted by zenrat on Friday, July 14, 2006 1:07 AM
Completely off topic.
notlezah, i've been pondering your 'handle' for a while and it's just hit me that you're backwards...

ShockBig Smile

It's the 21st Century. Where's my Jet Pack & Flying Car? On the bench - detritus mainly.

Ninjas don't have pockets.

  • Member since
    September, 2004
  • From: Flathill, Trondheim, Norway
Posted by Atmobil on Friday, July 14, 2006 4:16 AM
That is a great tutorial. Maybe this can even work for my Formula Vee project. I have been thinking of making a vacuum form but I think I'll have to test this one out.

What about using the kind of clear plastic you find in the packing of lets say a hotwheel toy car. I see this 5pack Hotwheels sets you get everywhere has about 20cm*10cm of clear plastic in them. Could this be used for such a thing?
Gaute Halsaunet TTT (Things Take Time) http://photobucket.com/albums/y223/Atmobil/ http://www.hubgarage.com/mygarage/Atmobil
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: SW Missouri
Posted by kustombuilder1 on Friday, July 14, 2006 5:07 AM
The Squadron Thermaform has saved many a kit for me. Take this Daytona for instance. When I got it, both the rear hatch glass and the windshield had deep tire marks in them. The rear quater glasses had nasty scratches, so basically none ofthe glass was useable.......... Until Squadron thermaform.

All of the windows in this one are thermaform, and I like the way it looks, especially on older kits that have really thick widows, the Thermaform is a lot thinner and more accurate-looking. It paints and tints just like regular clear parts and it's not nearly as brittle.
Click the pics for a closer view.


Darrin Setting a new standard for painfully slow builds.
  • Member since
    March, 2004
  • From: Bath, Somerset, United Kingdom
Posted by Cycolac Fan on Friday, July 14, 2006 10:41 AM
just wondered how you avoid the new windshield from sticking to the master as it cools? I can imagine the clear smooth surface of the original piece melting.

Mike
Mike "Good hands, bad taste in cars." Yes I'm a grown up 'playing' with toys but a lot of adults my age drink beer or play computer games - and I've got something to show for the time and money I've spent...
  • Member since
    April, 2004
  • From: generally earth
Posted by notlezah on Friday, July 14, 2006 1:41 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by zenrat

Completely off topic.
notlezah, i've been pondering your 'handle' for a while and it's just hit me that you're backwards...

ShockBig Smile

You have no idea how true that is...Laugh

QUOTE: Atmobil Posted: Today, 04:16:31 AM
That is a great tutorial. Maybe this can even work for my Formula Vee project. I have been thinking of making a vacuum form but I think I'll have to test this one out.

What about using the kind of clear plastic you find in the packing of lets say a hotwheel toy car. I see this 5pack Hotwheels sets you get everywhere has about 20cm*10cm of clear plastic in them. Could this be used for such a thing?


It should, I've been saving the flat part of deli sandwich boxes to vacuform stuff with.
I made my own vacuformer:
http://www.scaleautomag.com/sca/community/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=16398

QUOTE: Cycolac Fan Posted: Today, 10:41:56 AM
just wondered how you avoid the new windshield from sticking to the master as it cools? I can imagine the clear smooth surface of the original piece melting.

Mike


you aren't getting it hot enough to melt, only enough to soften it...
I am Howard, Jack of all trades,Master of none...current projects: Diorama-->60's gas station, Post WWIII PerriPeekaboo...See my stuff here: http://public.fotki.com/notlezah/ Simple rules. Have you read them? http://www.scaleautomag.com/sca/community/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=7502
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Arroyo Grande, CA
Posted by MojoDoctor on Friday, July 14, 2006 2:52 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Atmobil
What about using the kind of clear plastic you find in the packing of lets say a hotwheel toy car.... Could this be used for such a thing?

Would it matter that the plastic has already been heated and shrank? I do not think this type of plastic would work well again.

But what do I know? Clown

Matt Good judgement is the result of experience, Experience is the result of poor judgement. Mark Twain

  • Member since
    April, 2004
  • From: generally earth
Posted by notlezah on Friday, July 14, 2006 3:42 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by MojoDoctor
Would it matter that the plastic has already been heated and shrank? I do not think this type of plastic would work well again.

But what do I know? Clown

Actually Mojo, it's been stretched and yes you can reuse it, although with a complex shape it may stretch so thin it splits open...should be fine for a smooth curve like a windshield...in fact most plastic processors reuse defective casts and waste,they just grind it up and remelt it...as long as it doesn't get burnt it's fine...Smile,Wink, & Grin
I am Howard, Jack of all trades,Master of none...current projects: Diorama-->60's gas station, Post WWIII PerriPeekaboo...See my stuff here: http://public.fotki.com/notlezah/ Simple rules. Have you read them? http://www.scaleautomag.com/sca/community/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=7502
  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Saint Louis, MO
Posted by dodgeon24s on Friday, July 14, 2006 5:43 PM
how can u make a windshield tho if you dont have a windshield for the car?
current projects-56 ford pickup,ford f350,dodge deora,cadillac escalade,mitsubishi eclipse FNF email me-hummerh2_06@yahoo.com
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, July 14, 2006 9:52 PM
is it really that easy?
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: SW Missouri
Posted by kustombuilder1 on Saturday, July 15, 2006 7:55 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Cycolac Fan

just wondered how you avoid the new windshield from sticking to the master as it cools? I can imagine the clear smooth surface of the original piece melting.

Mike


No, don't worry, the Thermaform doesn't stick to the original, and original wont melt out from under it. As the Thermaform instructions say, pull quickly over the original. This is because the original will act as a heat sink, and quickly draw the heat out of the Thermaform, thus hardening it into it's new shape almost instantly.Smile
Darrin Setting a new standard for painfully slow builds.
  • Member since
    March, 2004
  • From: Bath, Somerset, United Kingdom
Posted by Cycolac Fan on Monday, July 17, 2006 6:04 AM
Cool - I'll give it a go! Thanks for the explanations.
Mike
Mike "Good hands, bad taste in cars." Yes I'm a grown up 'playing' with toys but a lot of adults my age drink beer or play computer games - and I've got something to show for the time and money I've spent...
  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Mornington Peninsula, Victoria, Australia
Posted by zenrat on Tuesday, July 18, 2006 12:00 AM
This takes me back.
There is a difference between thermo plastic and thermo setting plastic.
Thermo plastic softens when heated, sets and then resoftens when reheated.
Thermosetting plastic softens when heated, sets and then stays that way when reheated.
How you tell the difference (apart from trial and error) I don't know.

It's the 21st Century. Where's my Jet Pack & Flying Car? On the bench - detritus mainly.

Ninjas don't have pockets.

  • Member since
    September, 2004
  • From: Flathill, Trondheim, Norway
Posted by Atmobil on Tuesday, July 18, 2006 3:37 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by MojoDoctor

QUOTE: Originally posted by Atmobil
What about using the kind of clear plastic you find in the packing of lets say a hotwheel toy car.... Could this be used for such a thing?

Would it matter that the plastic has already been heated and shrank? I do not think this type of plastic would work well again.

But what do I know? Clown


I had a look at this stuff last night and I don't think it has been heated up. This type of plastic looks like it has benn made in to a large flat sheet and then cut out with cuttingstamps (much like cardboard boxes) and then folded in to make the plastic window around the toy cars inside (again like cardboard boxes). I had a look at a pack I have and it is very clearly even thikness all around. So I think that it could work but still don't know for sure before I have tested itSmile
Gaute Halsaunet TTT (Things Take Time) http://photobucket.com/albums/y223/Atmobil/ http://www.hubgarage.com/mygarage/Atmobil
  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Flint, Mi, USA
Posted by Harold A. Palmer on Thursday, September 28, 2006 2:49 PM
Interesting- I sure as heck don't want to buy another 'Stang just for the windshield.
"Now if you'll excuse me, my chickens have some subpeonas to serve" Rat
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Arroyo Grande, CA
Posted by MojoDoctor on Wednesday, January 23, 2008 9:26 AM
I thought this thread could use a 'refresher boost' for some that may not know this technique.

Give it a try!

Matt Good judgement is the result of experience, Experience is the result of poor judgement. Mark Twain

  • Member since
    July, 2007
  • From: middle tennesee
Posted by grog243 on Wednesday, January 23, 2008 12:37 PM
i have used the clear plastic from a prepaint kit to make small parts and it works great! never thought of using it to replace windshields. great idea mojo!

James All the good things in life go VROOM! check out my photobucket. theres a link on my profile

http://s244.photobucket.com/albums/gg31/dwezil3/

  • Member since
    May, 2006
Posted by dsully66 on Friday, February 08, 2008 8:09 AM
Thanks for directing me here mojodoc! I'll have to give this a shot. Notlezah mentioned that he saved those deli plastic containers, those work pretty good for glasswork? Hmmm, wife likes to eat healthier with subs and stuff, plus my dad works in a grocery store. That might be the ticket I need.
Dan
  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by Eric on Thursday, August 10, 2017 1:42 PM

Sorry or resurecting such an old thread but I'm in dire need to creating a windshield for a Ferrari F50 and the link in this thread is long since dead.  Did anyone save a copy of these instruction on creating a windshield?

  • Member since
    October, 2008
Posted by oldcarguy on Saturday, August 12, 2017 11:12 AM

Hi ;

 To update this is futile . It's still viable here thirteen years later ! Now , what I do is the simplest of simple . If the windows in question have no compound curves ( Think a 59 G.M. Car ) Curves in both directions .

 I use .010 sheet from Evergreen and it's done .

 If it has the compound curves I get out my good old Mattel VAC-U-FORM . I Use the old wIndow as a mold and there I have it ! You have to put it in the machine at an angle because of the size , but it works great . Don't forget to support the mold with clay for strength when you bring the hot plastic down on it .

 There are aftermarket sheets that fit that machine . I do not know how well they work . O.C.G.

gjgeracci
  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by Eric on Saturday, August 12, 2017 12:49 PM

Thank you so much for the reply.  I hate resurrecting such an old thread but I didn't know where to ask my question.

I've been researching how to do this since I posted my message.  The windshield that I want to make is for an 1/18 scale model so I'm not sure what the original thickness is for this scale.  But the Ferrari F50's  windshield does have a bit of a curved to it so I might just have to invest in an inexpensive vacuum forming machine.  

Micro Mark seems to make a fairly inexpensive dental forming machine for around $100 so hopefully this would be sufficent.

  • Member since
    June, 2017
  • From: Mesa, AAZ
Posted by Ranchn62 on Saturday, August 12, 2017 2:38 PM

I haven't done any vacuum-forming since Jr. High, but I found a great source for large, flat pieces of clear plastic. I use the "box" that my Swiffer replacement pads come in. I'll have to measure the the thickness, but just by feel, it seems to feel right..   FYI

Dennis

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Nashua, New Hampshire
Posted by mrmike on Saturday, August 12, 2017 5:01 PM

I had to look up a Ferrari F50 just to see what the windshield looks like.  I don't think you really need to have a vacuum-formed windshield.  Just cut out a piece of clear plastic from some sort of flat "bubble packaging" and shape it to fit in the windshield frame.  Glue it in along the entire windshield frame and you should be set to go!  Just my My 2 Cents

"That's Spenser with an 'S' like the poet." Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985 

On my bench-1962 Ford Thunderbird Sports Roadster; 1968 Dodge Charger R/T

Classic Plastic Model Club 

The name is Mike...MrMike!

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by Eric on Saturday, August 12, 2017 6:15 PM

mrmike

I had to look up a Ferrari F50 just to see what the windshield looks like.  I don't think you really need to have a vacuum-formed windshield.  Just cut out a piece of clear plastic from some sort of flat "bubble packaging" and shape it to fit in the windshield frame.  Glue it in along the entire windshield frame and you should be set to go!  Just my My 2 Cents

Thanks for the tip.  I give it a try before considering investing in a vacuum forming machine.

  • Member since
    October, 2008
Posted by oldcarguy on Sunday, August 13, 2017 8:03 AM

Atmobil; long time no see .

 That would work too .

gjgeracci
  • Member since
    October, 2008
Posted by oldcarguy on Monday, August 14, 2017 12:40 PM

Mike ;

 The first time I Vac-Formed an aircraft canopy , I had that worry too . Turned out no need to worry . As soon as the plastic hit the actual kit canopy it was cooled off . 

gjgeracci

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