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Create your own windshield!

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  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Arroyo Grande, CA
Create your own windshield!
Posted by MojoDoctor on Friday, April 23, 2004 4:35 PM
How many of you have been frustrated by glue smudged windows, cracked or broken clear pieces, or just unhappy with how thick the kit provided windows look? In a past thread, I tried as best I could to describe a procedure that will allow any of us to make new, thinner glass for our models. I have found the link that describes this process much more clearly than I, and there are diagrams to illustrate the simple job.

If you take a moment and think about it, you can use this procedure with white plastic to recreate anything you choose. As with any new task, remember to practice first and be careful!

Here is a link to instructions for creating your own clear windows.
http://www.squadron.com/reviews/review-sq9003.htm

One note of caution!
The Thermaform clear plastic that Squadron sells is intended for small aircraft canopies. You may want to try a thicker clear plastic such as 0.10"

(EDIT) updated link

Matt Good judgement is the result of experience, Experience is the result of poor judgement. Mark Twain

  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: Hampshire, IL
Posted by elwoodz on Friday, April 23, 2004 4:55 PM
way coolThumbs Up i love it!!!

Mike Aylward

The smell of burning rubber and high octane stirs the soul

  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: I'm in Kentucky for good and it ain't bad.
Posted by hot ford coupe on Friday, April 23, 2004 5:11 PM
Good one Mojo. I've got the vacuum type machine in my office. I can get some pretty nice detail with it. Thanks for tlhe link.
I'm hopelessly addicted to building models. Not finishing them, just building them.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, April 23, 2004 5:44 PM
finally the information I was looking for.
would this also work with clear styrene sheets. Can you heat them?
Thanks MojoD,
Kelley Eight BallEvil
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Arroyo Grande, CA
Posted by MojoDoctor on Friday, April 23, 2004 6:12 PM
Yes lilBEAR, clear styrene and acetate which you can get a good hobby/graphics store. You can also use a lightbulb (100 watt) for the heat source. Be careful that the heat source doesn't burn through the plastic or your fingers! Sigh
Always remember to practice first.

Matt Good judgement is the result of experience, Experience is the result of poor judgement. Mark Twain

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, April 23, 2004 6:15 PM
i have the same question, i think it could work, but we may have to play around with till we get it!!!
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, April 23, 2004 7:10 PM
MojoDoctor, I read your original post (when you first posted it). Your
instructions were very detailed and clear. I tried making a windshield,
using your guide, and after 2 attempts I was successful. I wanted to thank you,
back then, for the info. But, to be honest I forgot to. So I'm doing it now, Thanks.
Stoney
P.S. I have since made several windshields and rear glass.
  • Member since
    January, 2004
Posted by lscrima on Friday, April 23, 2004 7:44 PM
BowBowBowBowBowBowBowBowBowBowBowBowBowBowBowBow
Oh Great one of ideas. I thank you for sharing your inner and outer knowledge.
BowBowBowBowBowBowBowBowBowBowBowBowBowBowBowBow
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, April 23, 2004 9:33 PM
Sign - DittoSign - DittoSign - DittoSign - DittoSign - Ditto
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Arroyo Grande, CA
Posted by MojoDoctor on Saturday, April 24, 2004 11:21 AM
I'm just glad I could help out!

This simple method could be used for creating fender flares, custom windshields and headlight covers, bubble roofs, hoodscoops, ...................

Matt Good judgement is the result of experience, Experience is the result of poor judgement. Mark Twain

  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: nw GA
Posted by bill mathewson on Monday, April 26, 2004 5:10 PM
Thank you for the link to Squadron for this really neat idea. Now I can finish several severely chopped models that are hiding away like dust bunnies.

On the subject of HEAD LITE COVERS, you can replicate the frosted or opaque ones used on customs and dream cars of the '50s and '60s by using women's fake finger- nails. Since women also have five pairs of fingers (usually), you'll get enough for five cars w/ each set, w/ each pair a little different than the last one. The finger- nail material can be filed or sanded just like plastic , or for that matter, just like fingernails. Obviously they take paint just like plastic.

I've used them for scoops, hood blisters, and custom tail lites, too. Not sure if they can be found in clear material to use in replicating head lites like on the Jag XKE, Ferrari GTO, and similar applications. Anyone have any experience with 'clear' finger- nails?Thanks in advance!

Bill
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Arroyo Grande, CA
Posted by MojoDoctor on Friday, June 04, 2004 6:26 PM
I thought I'd bump this up for anyone new here that may have some questions about making custom, or stock clear glass parts!

Matt Good judgement is the result of experience, Experience is the result of poor judgement. Mark Twain

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, June 04, 2004 10:19 PM
Have mercy! Thank you Mojo M.D.!
The kits do come with really thick glass. I feel it's one of the major details that gives the model a, well, a model look.
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Arroyo Grande, CA
Posted by MojoDoctor on Tuesday, March 01, 2005 9:41 AM
I'll bump this thread for some new members who may want to know about making their own clear parts.
Try it, you'll like it!

Matt Good judgement is the result of experience, Experience is the result of poor judgement. Mark Twain

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Milwaukee
Posted by JakeCouture on Tuesday, March 01, 2005 10:19 AM
thanks Mojo, I was just wondering this morning how I could replace the promo glass on a Blazer I'm working on. Now I know!
In the criminal justice system, the people are represented by two separate yet equally important groups. There are the police who investigate crimes, and the district attorneys who prosecute the offenders. These are their stories. Doink Doink! Jake Couture
  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: Hertfordshire UK
Posted by bobcrozier on Tuesday, March 01, 2005 10:50 AM
I,ve made/duplicated Funnycar/ dragster seats , fuel tanks, blower blankets by pull-forming sheet styrene in this way.
Just use the original kit part as a former.
basically anything that is simple has an outward profile and no fine detail!!
Watch those fingers though , I prefer to hold the sheet with a couple of large bulldog clips

bob
We'll fight them on the beaches etc etc etc.
  • Member since
    April, 2004
  • From: generally earth
Posted by notlezah on Tuesday, March 01, 2005 10:53 AM
Thanks, Mojo! for bringing this one up again,certainly a timeless tip for all of us!...Smile,Wink, & Grin
I am Howard, Jack of all trades,Master of none...current projects: Diorama-->60's gas station, Post WWIII PerriPeekaboo...See my stuff here: http://public.fotki.com/notlezah/ Simple rules. Have you read them? http://www.scaleautomag.com/sca/community/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=7502
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, March 01, 2005 10:54 AM
Thanks mojo, for bringing that back to the surface. Thumbs Up It's good to refresh the memory. Big Smile
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, March 01, 2005 11:42 AM
You da man Mojo!!!!! Thanks. You can also use a heat gun or a hair drier to warm up the Thermaform to make it soft to form the part. This would be alot safer than using a open flame.
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Arroyo Grande, CA
Posted by MojoDoctor on Tuesday, March 01, 2005 6:48 PM
A friend uses a bare lightbulb for the heat sorce. Just be careful and practice first!

Matt Good judgement is the result of experience, Experience is the result of poor judgement. Mark Twain

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Tuesday, March 01, 2005 6:51 PM
Thanks for the tip, Mojo. I missed this the last time around. This could be very helpful information.

Power matters in the straights.
Lightness matters everywhere. - Colin Chapman

Trevor

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, August 03, 2005 1:39 PM
great tutorial thanks mojo
  • Member since
    February, 2005
  • From: Emmett Idaho
Posted by bugsy_malonn on Wednesday, August 03, 2005 3:53 PM
Thanks Mojo Thats a cool tip I'm working on an old 1/16 scale General Lee right now. Restoring it and the windows were trash I was going to use a heat gun and bend it like I have done before but it takes a lot more time to get it right. This looks much easier I will have to give it a try
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, August 03, 2005 6:28 PM
This is JUST what I needed to know. I've had the worst luck with scale "glass". Thanks for the tip Mojo!
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, August 03, 2005 7:12 PM
Thanks Mojo! I've been needing to make a windshield for a '59 caddy hearse. I've bookmarked the link page. Thank you much!

Cool
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Arroyo Grande, CA
Posted by MojoDoctor on Monday, January 09, 2006 10:25 AM
This thread may need to be bumped up so the newer members can get a look at building their own clear parts!

Matt Good judgement is the result of experience, Experience is the result of poor judgement. Mark Twain

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Wild, Wonderful Wyoming!
Posted by fomocomav on Monday, January 09, 2006 11:24 AM
If you make yourself a wooden frame out of scrap wood, and get some Acco binder/paper clips, you can cut the clear plastic to size, clip the plastic to the frame, and then also have something to hold onto as you are warming up the plastic. A pair of work gloves might also help, and save your fingers, too. I worked for a company that did this in their electric oven, but we were also using .060 styrene, and required more heat. The clips shouldn't heat up that much, but if they do, they DO cool down rather quickly. I always used oven mitts, to avoid as much pain as possible!

fj

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, February 02, 2006 2:19 AM
Here is a VERY GOOD tip for anyone holding onto hot plastic ( or any other material ) If you get your fingers (thumb or index) too hot and they are in pain, just grab an ear lobe and gently squeeze. DON'T LAUGH until you have tried this . It really works. Just don't ask me why it works because I don't know. What you will feel is a little warmth and that is all.

maybe MOJO can explain this phenomena

BobApprove
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Arroyo Grande, CA
Posted by MojoDoctor on Sunday, February 12, 2006 11:10 PM
Hmmm, just saw this Bob and I do actually have an explaination for this. Squeezing your earlobe is using the ancient practice of accupressure, which is similar to accupuncture in it's theory.

As far as holding hot plastic when using this method, I've made aluminum frames from simple angle stock. Works great and oven mits will prevent burning the digits!

Matt Good judgement is the result of experience, Experience is the result of poor judgement. Mark Twain

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, July 14, 2006 12:10 AM
er... the webpage is no longer available...anyone can let me know what its contents are?

thanks

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