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MY first build. Part III painting....fail.

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  • Member since
    February 2020
MY first build. Part III painting....fail.
Posted by Manifoldhead on Sunday, March 8, 2020 10:31 AM

HI All,

 

Well, I got paint booth going and th primer looking pretty good and decided to go ahead  and use a spray con for now just to get the project moving rather than attempt the airbrush again. I bought a can of Rustoleum 2X as Ive seen youtubers use this and it came out looking pretty good.

 

So I'm spraying away, and it is going on a bit thick, but I'm going to keep going becuse I think I can make it look OK when bang! the body falls to bottom of the paint booth, ruining the paint.

 

It turns out the nice Tamiya stand I bought comes in two pieces and the top part will seperate from the bottom if you don't hold it right. Crap.

 

Sooooo I guess I have to learn how to strip paint from plastic so I might as well go for it now. I went bought a gllon of Purple Power at Walmart and the body had been soaking all night. Next up.....paint stripping. This hobby is going to be a blast!

  • Member since
    February 2020
Posted by Manifoldhead on Sunday, March 8, 2020 10:50 AM

OK, well the model soaked all night in it's purple bath........and nothing. The paint is still intact.

Do I let it soak longer?

Go with oven cleaner?

Chalk it up to experince and go with my other starter kit I have from years ago? A monogram '71 Hemicuda? It new, but the decals are kinda screwed up.

Or buy a newer kit, maybe two of the same?

 

 

 

  • Member since
    May 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Sunday, March 8, 2020 11:03 AM

First of all, what brand of "purple stuff" are you using?

They are not all created equal.

If you're using Purple Power, get rid of it and get some Super Clean.

Super Clean has a great deal more of the active incredient that helps remove paint than Purple Power.

Second, I think you would be much better served to start with a better paint than Rustoleum.

Get some Tamiya or Testors lacquers.

They're a hell of a lot easier to deal with and will give you a much better result than Rustoleum.

 

 

 

 

Steve

  • Member since
    February 2020
Posted by Manifoldhead on Sunday, March 8, 2020 11:17 AM

Goofy62

First of all, what brand of "purple stuff" are you using?

They are not all created equal.

If you're using Purple Power, get rid of it and get some Super Clean.

Super Clean has a great deal more of the active incredient that helps remove paint than Purple Power.

Second, I think you would be much better served to start with a better paint than Rustoleum.

Get some Tamiya or Testors lacquers.

They're a hell of a lot easier to deal with and will give you a much better result than Rustoleum.

 

 

 

 

Steve

 

 

OK, thanks. I tried to save a few bucks and got actual "Purple Power". I'm off to buy the Super Clean.

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Nashua, New Hampshire
Posted by mrmike on Sunday, March 8, 2020 3:34 PM

Do what I did with your paint stands...put them together and drill a hole into both sections and insert a screw to hold them together.  If you need to take them apart, just remove the screw and separate them.

"That's Spenser with an 'S' like the poet."

Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
    February 2020
Posted by Manifoldhead on Sunday, March 8, 2020 3:50 PM

mrmike

Do what I did with your paint stands...put them together and drill a hole into both sections and insert a screw to hold them together.  If you need to take them apart, just remove the screw and separate them.

 

Thanks. That's happening this afternoon.

  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Rochester NY
Posted by Unglued on Sunday, March 8, 2020 5:05 PM

It is hard to tell from the picture, but one thing you could of tried is wet sanding starting with  800 grit sand paper and working toward finer grit feathering out the paint line. Reprime the sanded area and then repaint. Light coats is the better way to go. Heavy coats gets me in trouble more often then not. One great piece of equiptment is either a food dehydrator or making yourself a drying box utilizing a 75 watt incandescent bulb . It speeds up drying time of the model, allowing handling sooner. I use oven cleaner in the blue can to strip paint and chrome parts. Works pretty good.

  • Member since
    December 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Monday, March 9, 2020 6:44 AM

Bummer! I have never used a Tamiya stand, but I have heard many complain of the same problem you experienced. A number of freshly painted bodies have hit the floor, just as yours did.

Steve (goofy) has great advice. Ditch the Rustoleum and go with hobby specific paint, at least until you get the basics down.

Also as Steve says, get proper Castrol Super Clean. It will also help to use some course sandpaper to sand down just to the primer in a couple spots to help the stripper do its thing. If the Castrol doesn't do the trick, try 91% - 99% isopropyl alcohol. Brake fluid works very well on some stubborn paint, but it's my last resort as it's a bit messy.

"It would be unusual, if the unusual didn't occur."

- Steamboat Gariepy

Trevor

  • Member since
    August 2015
  • From: Hamptonville, NC
Posted by TarheelRick on Tuesday, March 10, 2020 11:07 AM

"Do what I did with your paint stands...put them together and drill a hole into both sections and insert a screw to hold them together.  If you need to take them apart, just remove the screw and separate them.
 Bang Head  Why didn't I think of that?  That idea is going to save me a bunch of headaches.

I build models because I can't afford the real thing!

  • Member since
    February 2020
Posted by Manifoldhead on Tuesday, March 10, 2020 8:50 PM

Bainford

Bummer! I have never used a Tamiya stand, but I have heard many complain of the same problem you experienced. A number of freshly painted bodies have hit the floor, just as yours did.

Steve (goofy) has great advice. Ditch the Rustoleum and go with hobby specific paint, at least until you get the basics down.

Also as Steve says, get proper Castrol Super Clean. It will also help to use some course sandpaper to sand down just to the primer in a couple spots to help the stripper do its thing. If the Castrol doesn't do the trick, try 91% - 99% isopropyl alcohol. Brake fluid works very well on some stubborn paint, but it's my last resort as it's a bit messy.

 

 

Thanks. The SuperClean worked a LOT better than the Purple Power. The color coat came of quite easily but that primer was really stubborn. Soak, scrub repeat. It took a couple of days. I used a toothpick for the crevices. This NOT something I want to do very often, although it's good to know that it's possible and the model isn't completely ruined. I did bust the post on the wind wing. I think I can sand a plastic toothick to fix it...we'll see.

  • Member since
    February 2020
Posted by Manifoldhead on Wednesday, March 11, 2020 10:07 AM
The Super Clean worked.....Thanks!
  • Member since
    February 2020
Posted by Manifoldhead on Friday, March 20, 2020 12:11 AM

Howdy All,

Well, I have learned a lot in the past few days. I now know I can strip paint from a model but it takes work to get the primer off.

I learned that decanting paint is not that hard.

I learnd a LOT about airbrushing. I reshot my model with an airbrush using decanted rustoleum 2X gloss paint. It came out all gritty and nasty. After perusing the good 'ol internet and using up a LOT of plastic spoons I found I had the air pressure too high even though I'm using a siphon feed brush. I also learned that decanted paint needs to be thinned a bit for aiir brushing as well.

What I do now is tuen the pressure down all the way. I hold the trigger on the brush (single action Badger 200) and trun the pressure up until until the thinner shoots out nice. Then I put the paint in and off I go. I was probably too far away from my work as well. I got some pretty shiny results on the spoons. I will sand the car as best I can and add another coat and probably call it good.

 

Since this poor model is expendable, I will go ahead and see if I prefer BMF or a Molotow chrome pen for doing chrome trim on the body. Decals and clear coat should be exciting adventures as well!!!

 

  • Member since
    September 2008
  • From: Texas
Posted by jkitman on Friday, March 20, 2020 9:08 AM

You might try the small bottles of water based model paints at the hobby store like model masters. They are a lot less toxic. Clean up and thin with water. They are every bit as good as solvent based paints. You just have to get the consistency down. Thinning them for the airbrush requires some experimentation.  I found very little water is required to get the right viscosity.  Also it needs to be applied in lighter coats. You cant pile it on all at once. And you don't have to use all the nasty thinners to clean up you airbrush and paint brushes. Also I found that you have to clean ALL your parts with warm soapy water and rinsing and drying completely prior to applying  primer.  Good luck!

  • Member since
    February 2020
Posted by Manifoldhead on Friday, March 20, 2020 10:14 AM

jkitman

You might try the small bottles of water based model paints at the hobby store like model masters. They are a lot less toxic. Clean up and thin with water. They are every bit as good as solvent based paints. You just have to get the consistency down. Thinning them for the airbrush requires some experimentation.  I found very little water is required to get the right viscosity.  Also it needs to be applied in lighter coats. You cant pile it on all at once. And you don't have to use all the nasty thinners to clean up you airbrush and paint brushes. Also I found that you have to clean ALL your parts with warm soapy water and rinsing and drying completely prior to applying  primer.  Good luck!

 

 

Thanks......I'm thinking I'm going this route. I will finish this model with this stuff and move to the acrylics on the next one. Do they work for getting a nice finish on a car body? I tried some Tamiya acrylic orange on my engine block and it didn't want to cover very well with a brush. The old Testors enamel brushed on like a breeze.

Should I try the water based primer? I've decided I'm going to use a rattle can for primer if I have to keep using the laquer/enamel stuff anyway.

  • Member since
    December 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Friday, March 20, 2020 7:02 PM

The Tamiya acrylics are very nice paints, but they don't brush well at all. 

You may find, as you get comfortable with your airbrush, that you will be spraying the engine and chassis parts, too. 

"It would be unusual, if the unusual didn't occur."

- Steamboat Gariepy

Trevor

  • Member since
    September 2008
  • From: Texas
Posted by jkitman on Friday, March 20, 2020 7:10 PM

I tried to use acrylic paints on bare plastic and it just seem to bead up. I primed the block and the paint looked great. It takes several coats. It doesn't look as thick and shiny as enamel but on the same hand I always thought that thick look was too much. And if you handle it alot it might wear off a little on sharp edges. It does keep from covering up fine detail and you can always put a coat of clear acrylic on it. I like it for alot of things. Just experiment and you will find a place for it. Another cool trick I discovered was , you can take those furniture touchup pens and change chrome plating into gold, brass or copper real easy. I was totally surprised at the outcome.  Just make sure you let it dry completely and even then don't handle it alot. I used it after I had completed a model as accents. Too cool. It would be hard to cover a large area but you could buy  a small can of furniture stain and use an airbrush.  There again, it might be suspect to fingerprints. I havent tried putting a clear topcoat on it. Let me know what you think. I would try a pen before I bought a small can.Good luck. 

  • Member since
    December 2019
  • From: New Braunfels,Tx.
Posted by Metalbender on Saturday, March 21, 2020 11:40 AM

HI;

      Although I do have the Tamiya Paint Stand I still use the old tried and true Bent hangar for cars. Why? Never have had one fail. Spray all over then hang in a dust free place upside down. Couple of hours later Carefully put in cakebox for gasout.Give that twenty four hours.

      I usually go to another project and let it set for about a week. Why? Well, think about this, gasout times vary as does the times with different types of paint. Then I come back and foil .Finish with very thin Glosscoat and done. Yes,I overpaint my foil to be sure it stays secure under all the handling it's going to get.

  • Member since
    May 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Saturday, March 21, 2020 11:41 AM

Manifoldhead

 

 
Bainford

Bummer! I have never used a Tamiya stand, but I have heard many complain of the same problem you experienced. A number of freshly painted bodies have hit the floor, just as yours did.

Steve (goofy) has great advice. Ditch the Rustoleum and go with hobby specific paint, at least until you get the basics down.

Also as Steve says, get proper Castrol Super Clean. It will also help to use some course sandpaper to sand down just to the primer in a couple spots to help the stripper do its thing. If the Castrol doesn't do the trick, try 91% - 99% isopropyl alcohol. Brake fluid works very well on some stubborn paint, but it's my last resort as it's a bit messy.

 

 

 

 

Thanks. The SuperClean worked a LOT better than the Purple Power. The color coat came of quite easily but that primer was really stubborn. Soak, scrub repeat. It took a couple of days. I used a toothpick for the crevices. This NOT something I want to do very often, although it's good to know that it's possible and the model isn't completely ruined. I did bust the post on the wind wing. I think I can sand a plastic toothick to fix it...we'll see.

 

Manifoldhead

 

 
Bainford

Bummer! I have never used a Tamiya stand, but I have heard many complain of the same problem you experienced. A number of freshly painted bodies have hit the floor, just as yours did.

Steve (goofy) has great advice. Ditch the Rustoleum and go with hobby specific paint, at least until you get the basics down.

Also as Steve says, get proper Castrol Super Clean. It will also help to use some course sandpaper to sand down just to the primer in a couple spots to help the stripper do its thing. If the Castrol doesn't do the trick, try 91% - 99% isopropyl alcohol. Brake fluid works very well on some stubborn paint, but it's my last resort as it's a bit messy.

 

 

 

 

Thanks. The SuperClean worked a LOT better than the Purple Power. The color coat came of quite easily but that primer was really stubborn. Soak, scrub repeat. It took a couple of days. I used a toothpick for the crevices. This NOT something I want to do very often, although it's good to know that it's possible and the model isn't completely ruined. I did bust the post on the wind wing. I think I can sand a plastic toothick to fix it...we'll see.

 

I should have let you know that Super Clean some times will not work well on the primer.

Often times, alcohol wipes do a very good job of removing the primer remaining after the paint is gone.

 

 

 

Steve

  • Member since
    February 2020
Posted by Manifoldhead on Wednesday, April 1, 2020 9:25 PM

Thanks. After a lot of practice, I just can't seem to get the aribrush to put on a nice layer of paint, I'm clearly doing something wrong I can't figure out and I'm sick if the endless clean up with smelly chemicals. I'm going to learn with it using acrylics.

 

I understand that acrylics are very difficult to get a nice shiny car type finish so I practiced with the spray can o finsh this one.. I got pretty good with it and it looked liked I got an acceptable coat with but the paint on the nose cone of the Superbird cracked and acted like it was reacting with something. It did it a little on the car as well, but I was able sand it out on the car, but the nose cone went back into the purple pool. I decided to let it soak until the primer will come off faily easly. After about 5 days it's starting to come off easier.

I now know why people have two project going at a time. I had another model my wife bought me a long time ago because I was into the old Chrysler muscle cars. It a little joke so I could have a Hemicuda. Anyway I started the '71 hemicuda. It's old revell kit that seems like a another good one for a beginner. This time it will be Tamiya paints from their cans.

I will not give up on the first one, though!

 

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