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Ouch ! Whose who's got the Sunglasses ?

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  • Member since
    October, 2008
Ouch ! Whose who's got the Sunglasses ?
Posted by oldcarguy on Monday, March 25, 2019 11:52 AM

Hi ;

    Are you all ready to get really upset with me ? After you read this I bet you will . I have gone to many shows and contest over the years . Model cars stand out because they are so colorful .

     Now, are you sure they are supposed to be so shiny? I mean ,com'on how is it that a car can look like it is molded from Swarofski Crystal ? I have NEVER seen a real car so shiny! Three ,four coats of clear and then buffing is kind of anal isn't it ?

   Look around you .Even in most car museums featuring the real classic creations by long gone builders and the modern customs, the cars DON'T look this way . This is where I draw the line .Well painted and realistically clear coated is one thing. But , and I am serious about this .If the lines at doors and hoods etc. are clogged with Clear and slightly rounded at the edges means that's to many coats of clear .

      Many of us state we are looking for realism .Well for your information , My Brand new Cadillac El-Dorado was shiny as heck. Then I went and had the tires changed to my brand .The lower edges of this car were Orange peeled in spots ! Yessir orange-peel ! On a seven thousand dollar car !

 Oh the dealer fixed it, but that's the truth .Many new cars and customs have an impossible shine everywhere in miniature .Not Acceptable . One or two good coats of paint , Lightly buffed for that finished shine and done . Clearcoat .Really ? It may be used now by everyone .Shine covers a lot of flaws in real life too .What I'm sayin--- OCG

gjgeracci
  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Midwest
Posted by High octane on Monday, March 25, 2019 2:49 PM

Not upset with you at all and you're going to find a lot of shiny models in your lifetime. Evidently that's what the builder wants and that's how they'll build their models. I attend a lot of 1:1 car shows and cruise nights and there's always someone who will remark about the wheels on a car that they don't like them, however the owner does and that's all that counts.

High octane

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: East Bethel, Mn
Posted by midnightprowler on Monday, March 25, 2019 4:54 PM

Factory stock doesn't require a miles deep shine, but street rods, machines, customs, up to the builder.

1 Corinthians 15:51-54
1 Thessalonians 4:13-18

Ask me about Speedway Decals

  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by mustang1989 on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 7:47 AM

I build alot of my cars/ trucks how I would want them in real life and alot of what I build are mild customs. I did just get through with a factory stock (minus a wheel swap) that I threw a pretty shiny gloss on but I have a real love/ interest in that truck and it's what I'd want it to look like in real life so I went for broke. I do agree with you that factory stock builds don't have that mirror like finish and in the name of "correctness" is not correct at all. As for myself, I take certain liberties that I don't in aircraft modeling. Aircraft modeling to me is history and it ALL has to be correct (or as correct as it can be) which is really time consuming and I have to be anal about it. Building cars is relaxing to me so I relax my "correctness" to suit.

Being really stupid is the new smart!! 

    Joe

  • Member since
    March, 2019
  • From: Quitman, Texas
Posted by LostInStyreneAnd... on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 9:19 AM

Not upset one bit!    In the 1:1 world, with antiques & classics, it's called 'over-restored'.   I think for show cars, or high $$$ customs - it's 'ok' to make it really deep and shiny, but I've always tried to be careful to 'keep it real' - no matter what.

Eric Automobile

  • Member since
    February, 2016
Posted by Plowboy on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 12:16 PM

I used to have a similar mindset. As I've gotten older, I've came to the realization that there is no right or wrong way to build or paint a model. As long as the person who built it is happy with it, that's all that matters. I build the way I build. Right or wrong. Everyone has the same right. The only people who are truly wrong are those who criticize others for not building the way they do or how they think is the "correct" way. 

I don't like factory stock. Never have. Never will. But, I don't criticize people who build a model in that manner. It's their right to build their model how they want. Isn't that what we all do?

I'm more annoyed by people who criticize other's work while never showing their own.   

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: East Bethel, Mn
Posted by midnightprowler on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 4:28 PM

Plowboy

I used to have a similar mindset. As I've gotten older, I've came to the realization that there is no right or wrong way to build or paint a model. As long as the person who built it is happy with it, that's all that matters. I build the way I build. Right or wrong. Everyone has the same right. The only people who are truly wrong are those who criticize others for not building the way they do or how they think is the "correct" way. 

I don't like factory stock. Never have. Never will. But, I don't criticize people who build a model in that manner. It's their right to build their model how they want. Isn't that what we all do?

I'm more annoyed by people who criticize other's work while never showing their own.   

 

Couldnt have said it any better sir. Except my primary build style is factory stock. But I appreciate seeing all styles Of building

1 Corinthians 15:51-54
1 Thessalonians 4:13-18

Ask me about Speedway Decals

  • Member since
    October, 2008
  • From: Kennesaw, GA
Posted by nick63 on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 9:02 PM

Really happy to see this comment about those incredible shiny cars. I always thought my cars looked good and could never achieve the mile deep shine. After to going to some shows, I would get discouraged to some extent but then I would plod along and glad I did. Your article here was a breath of fresh air on the subject and appreciated.

  • Member since
    May, 2005
  • From: Central U.K.
Posted by hayes on Thursday, March 28, 2019 8:07 AM

I go to car shows a lot &, despite seeing all the owners washing & polishing their 1:1 scale cars before the judges go round, they never achieve the "see your face in it " sort of shine that I see on many models. I do use a final clear coat on my cars, but I never go in for the sort of polished effect talked about here.

Too much modelling suffers from the sort of "appearance mantras" such as "see your face in it " shines. Like Mustang1989 I used to model aircraft until I got fed up of the "picky" types querying whether my model had quite the precise Federal Standard 595 shade of grey, despite using paint labelled as such. The model aircraft mantra was that everything must be dead matt, even if the real thing was glossy. I remember looking at a matt, weathered & panel highlighted model of a jet fighter, the friend I was with said "I used to work on them when I was in the Air Force, they never looked like that. If my aircraft looked like that the Chief would have a word with me & it wouldn't have been a pleasant word".

I love modelling cars, my display cabinet has changed to be a riot of color, no one can say that a color isn't quite right because I answer that it is a model of a restored car & it was the choice of the new owner. Unless you are building for a competition, I agree with Plowboy, build it the way you want & the way that gives you most pleasure - especially when it is finished & goes into your display.

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Thursday, March 28, 2019 12:01 PM

I hear this argument a lot more these days, about models being too shiny, and while there is some validity to it, there are also some variables that we need to keep in mind.

First is this ridiculous question of whether or not a model should, or should not have orange peel in the paint.

The answer is NO! it should not!

We need to take into consideration the fact that we are building replicas in 1/25th scale.

If you look at a 1:1 automobile close up, chances are that you will find some orange peel in the paint, but if you consider the probability of being able to detect that miniscule of an imperfection when it has been reduced in size by 25 times, there is nearly zero possibility that it could be seen by the naked eye.

All that needs to be done to verify this is to take a photograph of an average factory painted car, reduce the photo to roughly 1/25th the size of the actual automobile, and then try to detect the imperfections.

It will be literally impossible.

Anyone who argues that orange peel should be detectable on a 1/25th scale model is making excuses for their inability, or unwillingness, to strive for a smooth finish.

This is not a direct jab at the OP's statements.

There are "orange peel appologists" throughout the hobby. 

 

Shine is a bit more subjective.

While I agree that there are circumstances where a paint job can look too shiney, in general a nice shine on a model is the ultimate goal.

Unless you are building with the goal of a dull finish as with flat or satin paint, the model should exhibit a nice smooth, relatively shiney surface.

The OP mentions a phenomena commonly referred to as the "dipped in paint" affect, where the panel edges exhibit that rounded appearance and the panel lines and other details loose their sharpness due to the over abundance of paint or clear coat.

I agree that this is completely undesirable.

Another phenomenon that I refer to as the "candy affect", is just the general look of being too shiny, almost like a piece of hard candy.

This is generally caused by spraying high gloss finishes and then doing nothing to mute the affect of the high gloss.

This is where polishing comes in.

In my opinion, every paint job, no matter how smooth or shiney it may be at the onset, benefits from a good polishing.

Real automobiles will generally have minute swirls and scratches in the paint which will mitigate the shine to some extent.

While the scratches may not be evident, it is enough to take away some of that "candy" appearance.

This can be replicated on a model by polishing which will not only help eliminate any undesirable orange peel, but will also add the correct "luster" to the paint by adding those microscopic scratches.

I would also like to reiterate that the number of color or clear coats has little bearing in how a finish comes out in the end.

It is not the number of coats that are applied, but how they are applied, and how heavily.

I routinely shoot as many as 4 coats of color and 5 clear coats on my builds, but I defy anyone to find any heavy buildup around panel lines or other details.

There is no indication on my finished builds that there are as many as 6 coats of primer and 9 coats of color and clear.

I have reasons for doing this that I won't get into here.

In the end, there is no correlation between the number of coats of paint and the finished result if it is done correctly.

Likewise, polishing is a highly useful tool in obtaining a realistic appearance, which is after all, what we are all going for.

 

 

Steve

 

 

 

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Saturday, March 30, 2019 11:43 AM

I agree with Steve (Goofy 62).  

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Canberra, Australia
Posted by aussiemuscle308 on Monday, April 01, 2019 1:12 AM
my only request is that you enjoy building your models. other than that, have fun!

My Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/87459383@N07/albums

  • Member since
    October, 2008
Posted by oldcarguy on Thursday, April 11, 2019 9:27 AM

Hi;

   If you are wondering why you've never seen my models is that until about seven months ago I didn't know how. Now, that said I am involved in a train museum so no cars have been built in about two years .I do hope that changes soon and then I will start out with " Maliblue " ( My name for it !) OCG

gjgeracci

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