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Model car building is dying off..apparently. But who;s to blame ??

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  • Member since
    February, 2004
  • From: nottingham,england
Model car building is dying off..apparently. But who;s to blame ??
Posted by arcturus on Wednesday, February 27, 2019 2:41 PM

Well, the older genertion say kids aren't into model making because of gaming, or the internet, and that the older generation that would of bought JoHan kits etc are getting to rickety or dying off as well.  

But is it actually the model companies themselves to blame ? 
Like most things is there a shift in peoples interests. 
Read the comments in any  "What would you like to see built" thread on any forum, chances are it's going to be filled with Lincolns, re-issues of Toronados and Eldorados, station wagons, chrysler 300's etc. Now the supposed realistic response to those requests as that it'll cost to much to tool a new 1975 Toronado kit for example, and Revell etc won't do it because they won't be able to retool it as anything other than stock and base it on failure of the Caprice taxi kit.

However, bring on the Mustang kits and muscle kits, suprisingly you get a lot of moaning from the mature modelling community about "Oh god no, not another muscle car kit" . 

So, what do we want ?Are the manufacturers missing a trick by not catering for all ?

At the moment, as someone who's building model cars for 25 years, I'm struggling to get excited over anything thats coming out. However, I am finding myself drawn more towards the diecast and pre-built resin scene as the quality of diecasts has vastly improved since the Ertl 70 Chevelle and variation is huge.


BoS is making alot of obscure 4 door and 70's cars, Greenlight making an 89 Colony park (twice, 1:18 and 1:64 ) and 67 Impala 4 door, and companies like Airtrax resin are making 4 door cars , are these companies all in the wrong ? 
To look at it simply They seem to be over taking companies like Revell in terms of popularity, and why is that ? Would these companies be so popular if they to were churning just muscle car models ....so is it Revell or who ever missing a trick ?. 
May be our taste in desirable cars is changing. I know for a fact in Europe, the appetite for large old 70's american cars is massive. 

Is it time a company like Revell should try and diversify it's range ? Keep the muscle car kits but also have a go at doing some big old land boats. We're model makers, we buy models to build how we want. Not having a pro street version of one type won't stop model makers from buying two or three copies of a model.

Because unlike some Robin hoods,I can speak with an english accent...
  • Member since
    March, 2017
  • From: Brighton England
Posted by Spencer Mopar Fan on Wednesday, February 27, 2019 4:07 PM

I frequently look at a site called Hiroboy , UK based , who primarily deal in JDM vehicles and incredibly expensive 1950's F1 cars .

Now I understand that a lot of people would automatically say the likes of a " Skyline GT-R " or " RX-7 " etcetera but......... 

I brought a 1969 Isuzu Bellet 1.6 GT-r . Only ever seen one on PS2 Gran Turismo 4.Confused

There are Hi-Lux Toyotas , silly Dihatsu Midget pick ups , 4 door Toyota's etc ....

What I guess I'm waffling on about some 'AHEM' other modelling markets are thriving , and relativly diverse . 

I guess we old gits have to admit Elvis is no longer King .

Ed Sheera......... Nope cant bring myself to finish that sentence .Zip it!

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Nashua, New Hampshire
Posted by mrmike on Wednesday, February 27, 2019 5:03 PM

It is all a thing called "marketing" and station wagons and 4-door sedans and such are not going to make it in a market that demands muscle cars and sport cars and hot trucks.  In todays fragile world of model manufacturers, they have to be extra careful of the money they spend for tooling.  Is repairing a tool cost effective and such?  Who knows!  Station wagons and 4-door sedans are being fulfilled by small manufacturers and they only make up a very small share of the market. 

Obscure makes are sitting on the shelf and stores are losing money the longer a product sits on the shelf and is not sold.  The longer a product sits on the shelf, it is more likely to be move to the discount shelf or aisle and when the product is finally sold, the store has lost a good share of its profit.  And, that is why a store is in business...to make a profit.  We, as modelers, can stand by and complain about how younger people are not interested in model building and more interested in iPads and the internet and such, and some of us have tried to interest them in building.  I think part of that lost of interest for them is called instant gratification and they can build something online and have it right away while we are taking weeks to months to build one kit that we are satisfied with.

For me, I have lost my grandkids to the iPads and the internet.  I tried to interest them and of course, they lost interest and will find something else to play with on their iPads.     

"That's Spenser with an 'S' like the poet."

Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985

On my bench-1961 Chevrolet Impala SS 409; Ford Transit Mk2

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
    February, 2004
  • From: nottingham,england
Posted by arcturus on Wednesday, February 27, 2019 5:37 PM

mrmike

It is all a thing called "marketing" and station wagons and 4-door sedans and such are not going to make it in a market that demands muscle cars and sport cars and hot trucks.  In todays fragile world of model manufacturers, they have to be extra careful of the money they spend for tooling.  Is repairing a tool cost effective and such.  Who knows!  Station wagons and 4-door sedans are being fulfilled by small manufacturers and they only make up a very small share of the market. 

Obscure makes are sitting on the shelf and stores are losing money the longer a product sits on the shelf and is not sold.  The longer a product sits on the shelf, it is more likely to be move to the discount shelf or aisle and when the product is finally sold, the store has lost a good share of its profit.  And, that is why a store is in business...to make a profit.  We, as modelers, can stand by and complain about how younger people are not interested in model building and more interested in iPads and the internet and such, and some of us have tried to interest them in building.  I think part of that lost of interest for them is called instant gratification and they can build something online and have it right away while we are taking weeks to months to build one kit that we are satisfied with.

For me, I have lost my grandkids to the iPads and the internet.  I tried to interest them and of course, they lost interest and will find something else to play with on their iPads.     

 



But are Muscle cars the be all and end all ? I mean, the 57 Ford Station wagon was a welcomed release and revell have been doing sports trucks and muscle cars for a while and have been struggling so are they really making money out of them ?
Like I said, if you go on the revell website, quite a lot of their customer base complain about another corvette, another mustang...another re-issue. 

But it still doesn't account for why more and more non model companies are turning to the 4 doors and wagons? They've obviously spotted a gap in the market and are competeing for that gap...and succeeding. It costs them $$$$$$ to tool up  a model as well. In fact, some of them re-issued their models.

Because unlike some Robin hoods,I can speak with an english accent...
  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Nashua, New Hampshire
Posted by mrmike on Wednesday, February 27, 2019 7:53 PM

arcturus

 

 
mrmike

It is all a thing called "marketing" and station wagons and 4-door sedans and such are not going to make it in a market that demands muscle cars and sport cars and hot trucks.  In todays fragile world of model manufacturers, they have to be extra careful of the money they spend for tooling.  Is repairing a tool cost effective and such.  Who knows!  Station wagons and 4-door sedans are being fulfilled by small manufacturers and they only make up a very small share of the market. 

Obscure makes are sitting on the shelf and stores are losing money the longer a product sits on the shelf and is not sold.  The longer a product sits on the shelf, it is more likely to be move to the discount shelf or aisle and when the product is finally sold, the store has lost a good share of its profit.  And, that is why a store is in business...to make a profit.  We, as modelers, can stand by and complain about how younger people are not interested in model building and more interested in iPads and the internet and such, and some of us have tried to interest them in building.  I think part of that lost of interest for them is called instant gratification and they can build something online and have it right away while we are taking weeks to months to build one kit that we are satisfied with.

For me, I have lost my grandkids to the iPads and the internet.  I tried to interest them and of course, they lost interest and will find something else to play with on their iPads.     

 

 

 



But are Muscle cars the be all and end all ? I mean, the 57 Ford Station wagon was a welcomed release and revell have been doing sports trucks and muscle cars for a while and have been struggling so are they really making money out of them ?
Like I said, if you go on the revell website, quite a lot of their customer base complain about another corvette, another mustang...another re-issue. 

But it still doesn't account for why more and more non model companies are turning to the 4 doors and wagons? They've obviously spotted a gap in the market and are competeing for that gap...and succeeding. It costs them $$$$$$ to tool up  a model as well. In fact, some of them re-issued their models.

 

 

No.  Muscle cars and sport cars are not the be all and end all.  It just happens to sell.  Smaller companies can offer the station wagons and 4-doors, but they are just small companies and they are filling a niche in the market.  You have to consider the bigger picture here and not just a small niche.  Some people see only what they like and consider it to be "the thing".    

"That's Spenser with an 'S' like the poet."

Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985

On my bench-1961 Chevrolet Impala SS 409; Ford Transit Mk2

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
    June, 2015
Posted by massmodeler on Wednesday, February 27, 2019 9:46 PM

With all due respect, I answered this question on another post called "SNAP".

  • Member since
    March, 2011
Posted by gulftarpon on Saturday, March 02, 2019 12:17 PM

At least in the US, I think the future of modeling is going to lie in finding lower cost, fast turn-around ways of production, and in movie and TV tie-ins and exploiting niche markets. Greenlight is a good example.

  • Member since
    November, 2013
Posted by Daddy_O on Monday, March 04, 2019 2:02 PM

Well, if you think about how 1:1 cars aren't being bought in the U.S., its no wonder that the interest isn't there for the youngies. Also, a video game for my XBox is slightly more than a model, so the kids are gonna opt for the game, which is "cool", and models aren't. Can you really imagine a pre-teen telling their pals that they are going home to build the latest model car?

People complain about muscle cars, but what commercials are the coolest? Can anyone say Dodge Demon? Heck, I can't even remember a Camaro commercial that recently aired. Models aren't just in trouble, cars are in trouble. The manufacturers are in a predicament, and its not going to get better. 

I belive resins and 3-D printing will be our lifeline for a while anyway.

  • Member since
    July, 2017
Posted by Oldschool4x4 on Monday, March 04, 2019 4:12 PM

You know, I've been hearing that the modelcar industry has been dying for years, first in the 70's and I think its just people with nothing else to do but start more "dying" rumors. The hobby is not dying!!!!!!!!! Just go build something, geez.....And what the hell, if it did dye, I've got enough kits to build for the next twenty years. Just my opinion about the subject.

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Midwest
Posted by High octane on Monday, March 04, 2019 7:26 PM

Plastic model kits were well received when the troops came home from the wars and built model airplanes, armor, and ships. Then in the late 50's model car promos were givin' out by the car dealers to prospective car buyers and evolved into model car kits that were accepted by the young lads likin' hot rods, and later on muscle cars. Those kits are still around today and being built mostly by gray haired adults who "lived the dream" back in the 60's and early 70's. Today most of the cars look like jelly beans with tires on them and of course there are a lot of SUV's being drivin' today as well. Well, who really wants to buy kits like that and build them also? Hmmm???

High octane

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Nashua, New Hampshire
Posted by mrmike on Monday, March 04, 2019 8:14 PM

Instead of placing blame, what can be done to improve the situation?  In todays society, it just seems as though someone needs to be blamed for whatever goes wrong on doesn't go according to plan.  Maybe if we tried to find a solution and try to eliminate the problem, things might get better.  

"That's Spenser with an 'S' like the poet."

Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985

On my bench-1961 Chevrolet Impala SS 409; Ford Transit Mk2

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
    April, 2012
Posted by litespeedsae on Monday, March 04, 2019 11:58 PM

mrmike

Instead of placing blame, what can be done to improve the situation?  In todays society, it just seems as though someone needs to be blamed for whatever goes wrong on doesn't go according to plan.  Maybe if we tried to find a solution and try to eliminate the problem, things might get better.  

 

Very good point Mrmk. You nailed it. No negativity here. I have often wondered about the potential for the actual 1:1 manufacters involvement. They demand licencing fees for a " likeness and image" but THEY could back/fund / produce easily. IMO, they started it all with the Promos I got at the dealerships as a little kid in late 50's and throughout the 60's!

Little Rock, Arkansas

  • Member since
    February, 2004
  • From: nottingham,england
Posted by arcturus on Tuesday, March 19, 2019 5:27 PM

mrmike

Instead of placing blame, what can be done to improve the situation?  In todays society, it just seems as though someone needs to be blamed for whatever goes wrong on doesn't go according to plan.  Maybe if we tried to find a solution and try to eliminate the problem, things might get better.  

 



With all due respect,the whole post is about finding a solution to make things better.  When something declines, someone is usually to blame.Whether it's the publics buying habits, or poor management etc.

  You have to find the negative reason (who is responsible) for something, to find the solution, hence why I suggested that maybe model companies should start looking at a different type of car to produce- a solution to the problem so things can get better. 

Because unlike some Robin hoods,I can speak with an english accent...

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