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Model car building is dying off..apparently. But who;s to blame ??

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  • Member since
    February, 2004
  • From: nottingham,england
Model car building is dying off..apparently. But who;s to blame ??
Posted by arcturus on Wednesday, February 27, 2019 2:41 PM

Well, the older genertion say kids aren't into model making because of gaming, or the internet, and that the older generation that would of bought JoHan kits etc are getting to rickety or dying off as well.  

But is it actually the model companies themselves to blame ? 
Like most things is there a shift in peoples interests. 
Read the comments in any  "What would you like to see built" thread on any forum, chances are it's going to be filled with Lincolns, re-issues of Toronados and Eldorados, station wagons, chrysler 300's etc. Now the supposed realistic response to those requests as that it'll cost to much to tool a new 1975 Toronado kit for example, and Revell etc won't do it because they won't be able to retool it as anything other than stock and base it on failure of the Caprice taxi kit.

However, bring on the Mustang kits and muscle kits, suprisingly you get a lot of moaning from the mature modelling community about "Oh god no, not another muscle car kit" . 

So, what do we want ?Are the manufacturers missing a trick by not catering for all ?

At the moment, as someone who's building model cars for 25 years, I'm struggling to get excited over anything thats coming out. However, I am finding myself drawn more towards the diecast and pre-built resin scene as the quality of diecasts has vastly improved since the Ertl 70 Chevelle and variation is huge.


BoS is making alot of obscure 4 door and 70's cars, Greenlight making an 89 Colony park (twice, 1:18 and 1:64 ) and 67 Impala 4 door, and companies like Airtrax resin are making 4 door cars , are these companies all in the wrong ? 
To look at it simply They seem to be over taking companies like Revell in terms of popularity, and why is that ? Would these companies be so popular if they to were churning just muscle car models ....so is it Revell or who ever missing a trick ?. 
May be our taste in desirable cars is changing. I know for a fact in Europe, the appetite for large old 70's american cars is massive. 

Is it time a company like Revell should try and diversify it's range ? Keep the muscle car kits but also have a go at doing some big old land boats. We're model makers, we buy models to build how we want. Not having a pro street version of one type won't stop model makers from buying two or three copies of a model.

Because unlike some Robin hoods,I can speak with an english accent...
  • Member since
    March, 2017
  • From: Brighton England
Posted by Spencer Mopar Fan on Wednesday, February 27, 2019 4:07 PM

I frequently look at a site called Hiroboy , UK based , who primarily deal in JDM vehicles and incredibly expensive 1950's F1 cars .

Now I understand that a lot of people would automatically say the likes of a " Skyline GT-R " or " RX-7 " etcetera but......... 

I brought a 1969 Isuzu Bellet 1.6 GT-r . Only ever seen one on PS2 Gran Turismo 4.Confused

There are Hi-Lux Toyotas , silly Dihatsu Midget pick ups , 4 door Toyota's etc ....

What I guess I'm waffling on about some 'AHEM' other modelling markets are thriving , and relativly diverse . 

I guess we old gits have to admit Elvis is no longer King .

Ed Sheera......... Nope cant bring myself to finish that sentence .Zip it!

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Nashua, New Hampshire
Posted by mrmike on Wednesday, February 27, 2019 5:03 PM

It is all a thing called "marketing" and station wagons and 4-door sedans and such are not going to make it in a market that demands muscle cars and sport cars and hot trucks.  In todays fragile world of model manufacturers, they have to be extra careful of the money they spend for tooling.  Is repairing a tool cost effective and such?  Who knows!  Station wagons and 4-door sedans are being fulfilled by small manufacturers and they only make up a very small share of the market. 

Obscure makes are sitting on the shelf and stores are losing money the longer a product sits on the shelf and is not sold.  The longer a product sits on the shelf, it is more likely to be move to the discount shelf or aisle and when the product is finally sold, the store has lost a good share of its profit.  And, that is why a store is in business...to make a profit.  We, as modelers, can stand by and complain about how younger people are not interested in model building and more interested in iPads and the internet and such, and some of us have tried to interest them in building.  I think part of that lost of interest for them is called instant gratification and they can build something online and have it right away while we are taking weeks to months to build one kit that we are satisfied with.

For me, I have lost my grandkids to the iPads and the internet.  I tried to interest them and of course, they lost interest and will find something else to play with on their iPads.     

"That's Spenser with an 'S' like the poet."

Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985

On my bench-1961 Chevrolet Impala SS 409; Aston Martin DB4; Cadillac Escalade

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
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  • From: nottingham,england
Posted by arcturus on Wednesday, February 27, 2019 5:37 PM

mrmike

It is all a thing called "marketing" and station wagons and 4-door sedans and such are not going to make it in a market that demands muscle cars and sport cars and hot trucks.  In todays fragile world of model manufacturers, they have to be extra careful of the money they spend for tooling.  Is repairing a tool cost effective and such.  Who knows!  Station wagons and 4-door sedans are being fulfilled by small manufacturers and they only make up a very small share of the market. 

Obscure makes are sitting on the shelf and stores are losing money the longer a product sits on the shelf and is not sold.  The longer a product sits on the shelf, it is more likely to be move to the discount shelf or aisle and when the product is finally sold, the store has lost a good share of its profit.  And, that is why a store is in business...to make a profit.  We, as modelers, can stand by and complain about how younger people are not interested in model building and more interested in iPads and the internet and such, and some of us have tried to interest them in building.  I think part of that lost of interest for them is called instant gratification and they can build something online and have it right away while we are taking weeks to months to build one kit that we are satisfied with.

For me, I have lost my grandkids to the iPads and the internet.  I tried to interest them and of course, they lost interest and will find something else to play with on their iPads.     

 



But are Muscle cars the be all and end all ? I mean, the 57 Ford Station wagon was a welcomed release and revell have been doing sports trucks and muscle cars for a while and have been struggling so are they really making money out of them ?
Like I said, if you go on the revell website, quite a lot of their customer base complain about another corvette, another mustang...another re-issue. 

But it still doesn't account for why more and more non model companies are turning to the 4 doors and wagons? They've obviously spotted a gap in the market and are competeing for that gap...and succeeding. It costs them $$$$$$ to tool up  a model as well. In fact, some of them re-issued their models.

Because unlike some Robin hoods,I can speak with an english accent...
  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Nashua, New Hampshire
Posted by mrmike on Wednesday, February 27, 2019 7:53 PM

arcturus

 

 
mrmike

It is all a thing called "marketing" and station wagons and 4-door sedans and such are not going to make it in a market that demands muscle cars and sport cars and hot trucks.  In todays fragile world of model manufacturers, they have to be extra careful of the money they spend for tooling.  Is repairing a tool cost effective and such.  Who knows!  Station wagons and 4-door sedans are being fulfilled by small manufacturers and they only make up a very small share of the market. 

Obscure makes are sitting on the shelf and stores are losing money the longer a product sits on the shelf and is not sold.  The longer a product sits on the shelf, it is more likely to be move to the discount shelf or aisle and when the product is finally sold, the store has lost a good share of its profit.  And, that is why a store is in business...to make a profit.  We, as modelers, can stand by and complain about how younger people are not interested in model building and more interested in iPads and the internet and such, and some of us have tried to interest them in building.  I think part of that lost of interest for them is called instant gratification and they can build something online and have it right away while we are taking weeks to months to build one kit that we are satisfied with.

For me, I have lost my grandkids to the iPads and the internet.  I tried to interest them and of course, they lost interest and will find something else to play with on their iPads.     

 

 

 



But are Muscle cars the be all and end all ? I mean, the 57 Ford Station wagon was a welcomed release and revell have been doing sports trucks and muscle cars for a while and have been struggling so are they really making money out of them ?
Like I said, if you go on the revell website, quite a lot of their customer base complain about another corvette, another mustang...another re-issue. 

But it still doesn't account for why more and more non model companies are turning to the 4 doors and wagons? They've obviously spotted a gap in the market and are competeing for that gap...and succeeding. It costs them $$$$$$ to tool up  a model as well. In fact, some of them re-issued their models.

 

 

No.  Muscle cars and sport cars are not the be all and end all.  It just happens to sell.  Smaller companies can offer the station wagons and 4-doors, but they are just small companies and they are filling a niche in the market.  You have to consider the bigger picture here and not just a small niche.  Some people see only what they like and consider it to be "the thing".    

"That's Spenser with an 'S' like the poet."

Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985

On my bench-1961 Chevrolet Impala SS 409; Aston Martin DB4; Cadillac Escalade

Classic Plastic Model Club

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    June, 2015
Posted by massmodeler on Wednesday, February 27, 2019 9:46 PM

With all due respect, I answered this question on another post called "SNAP".

  • Member since
    March, 2011
Posted by gulftarpon on Saturday, March 02, 2019 12:17 PM

At least in the US, I think the future of modeling is going to lie in finding lower cost, fast turn-around ways of production, and in movie and TV tie-ins and exploiting niche markets. Greenlight is a good example.

  • Member since
    November, 2013
Posted by Daddy_O on Monday, March 04, 2019 2:02 PM

Well, if you think about how 1:1 cars aren't being bought in the U.S., its no wonder that the interest isn't there for the youngies. Also, a video game for my XBox is slightly more than a model, so the kids are gonna opt for the game, which is "cool", and models aren't. Can you really imagine a pre-teen telling their pals that they are going home to build the latest model car?

People complain about muscle cars, but what commercials are the coolest? Can anyone say Dodge Demon? Heck, I can't even remember a Camaro commercial that recently aired. Models aren't just in trouble, cars are in trouble. The manufacturers are in a predicament, and its not going to get better. 

I belive resins and 3-D printing will be our lifeline for a while anyway.

  • Member since
    July, 2017
Posted by Oldschool4x4 on Monday, March 04, 2019 4:12 PM

You know, I've been hearing that the modelcar industry has been dying for years, first in the 70's and I think its just people with nothing else to do but start more "dying" rumors. The hobby is not dying!!!!!!!!! Just go build something, geez.....And what the hell, if it did dye, I've got enough kits to build for the next twenty years. Just my opinion about the subject.

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  • From: Midwest
Posted by High octane on Monday, March 04, 2019 7:26 PM

Plastic model kits were well received when the troops came home from the wars and built model airplanes, armor, and ships. Then in the late 50's model car promos were givin' out by the car dealers to prospective car buyers and evolved into model car kits that were accepted by the young lads likin' hot rods, and later on muscle cars. Those kits are still around today and being built mostly by gray haired adults who "lived the dream" back in the 60's and early 70's. Today most of the cars look like jelly beans with tires on them and of course there are a lot of SUV's being drivin' today as well. Well, who really wants to buy kits like that and build them also? Hmmm???

High octane

  • Member since
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  • From: Nashua, New Hampshire
Posted by mrmike on Monday, March 04, 2019 8:14 PM

Instead of placing blame, what can be done to improve the situation?  In todays society, it just seems as though someone needs to be blamed for whatever goes wrong on doesn't go according to plan.  Maybe if we tried to find a solution and try to eliminate the problem, things might get better.  

"That's Spenser with an 'S' like the poet."

Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985

On my bench-1961 Chevrolet Impala SS 409; Aston Martin DB4; Cadillac Escalade

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
    April, 2012
Posted by litespeedsae on Monday, March 04, 2019 11:58 PM

mrmike

Instead of placing blame, what can be done to improve the situation?  In todays society, it just seems as though someone needs to be blamed for whatever goes wrong on doesn't go according to plan.  Maybe if we tried to find a solution and try to eliminate the problem, things might get better.  

 

Very good point Mrmk. You nailed it. No negativity here. I have often wondered about the potential for the actual 1:1 manufacters involvement. They demand licencing fees for a " likeness and image" but THEY could back/fund / produce easily. IMO, they started it all with the Promos I got at the dealerships as a little kid in late 50's and throughout the 60's!

Little Rock, Arkansas

  • Member since
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  • From: nottingham,england
Posted by arcturus on Tuesday, March 19, 2019 5:27 PM

mrmike

Instead of placing blame, what can be done to improve the situation?  In todays society, it just seems as though someone needs to be blamed for whatever goes wrong on doesn't go according to plan.  Maybe if we tried to find a solution and try to eliminate the problem, things might get better.  

 



With all due respect,the whole post is about finding a solution to make things better.  When something declines, someone is usually to blame.Whether it's the publics buying habits, or poor management etc.

  You have to find the negative reason (who is responsible) for something, to find the solution, hence why I suggested that maybe model companies should start looking at a different type of car to produce- a solution to the problem so things can get better. 

Because unlike some Robin hoods,I can speak with an english accent...
  • Member since
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  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Saturday, May 04, 2019 1:04 PM

I like the diverse opinions here, so I thought I'd add mine.

To me, it isn't just the model car building culture changing here in the U.S., the entire culture is changing - DRAMATICALLY, and I can't see that as necessarily a bad thing, it is simply changing.
Each new generation finds it's own interests and changes the culture slightly. Some call it "Progress". A sort of "Evolution".

Look at what's happening with the "Shopping Malls" all over the U.S. - thet're closing in droves. Look what happened when people started to leave their country side farms to go into the city when the industrial revolution began. What about how the horse and buggy days changed with the onset of the automobile, and how the radio industry changed with the invention of the T.V. - Life changed all over the U.S continuously.

Today, the newest generation of young people are losing interest in the automobile because they are concerned about their future and their childrens future because of polution and the earth changing. They feel more responsible for making good lifestyle choices and shopping on the internet helps them accomplish that and they drive less or call "UBER" less. Much of the new generation aren't even buying cars.

I don't see any reason to blame anyone or anything as some seem to think works for them. Why as humans do we always have to find fault. Is it to justify or explain the changes.

Why not stand back and look at how the whole world is changing, instead of living in your own little world, blind to all that is happening, missing much of what is really good?

YES, I do believe the model car world is changing and shrinking, and there will be more model car companies bought out as the loss of interest continues.

I think we have seen the "Golden Years" of model car building at it's peak and seen that pass as interests move to more electronics. This is the age of electronics and everyone want's the latest toys.

Like most of you I have a smart phone, a smart TV, and a computor. Their all wonderfull and fun to enjoy, and I wouldn't have all the kit's I have if it wasn't for the computor and Ebay.

We can all choose to live life half empty or half full. My glass is completely full. I enjoy life. 

I think model car building will be around a lot longer, but I also think it will continue to look differently as it continues to change and shrink and even less new kits are made available. 

I myself think it's inevetable, but we can choose to have fun with what we have and not ruin it by having an attitude that spoils our enjoyment of this wonderful hobby.

We're all part of history and I'm excited to see what comes next and be involved in it.

As I said, just my My 2 CentsSmile, Wink & Grin.

 

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Nashua, New Hampshire
Posted by mrmike on Saturday, May 04, 2019 2:01 PM

arcturus

 

 
mrmike

Instead of placing blame, what can be done to improve the situation?  In todays society, it just seems as though someone needs to be blamed for whatever goes wrong on doesn't go according to plan.  Maybe if we tried to find a solution and try to eliminate the problem, things might get better.  

 

 

 



With all due respect,the whole post is about finding a solution to make things better.  When something declines, someone is usually to blame.Whether it's the publics buying habits, or poor management etc.

  You have to find the negative reason (who is responsible) for something, to find the solution, hence why I suggested that maybe model companies should start looking at a different type of car to produce- a solution to the problem so things can get better. 

 

 

Arcturus, I have to disagree with you on this.  If you place blame for a situation on somebody or something, you are not helping to correct a bad situation.  Placing blame only points a finger at something and says, "You are the culprit!"  Doesn't correct anything at all.  Looking for a solution can be difficult, but by gathering a group of like minded individuals together can help find a solution to a problem with ideas.  I personally don't buy the blame part will help find a solution at all. 

Treehugger Dave, I really like your well thought-out response.  Bravo!   

"That's Spenser with an 'S' like the poet."

Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985

On my bench-1961 Chevrolet Impala SS 409; Aston Martin DB4; Cadillac Escalade

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
    November, 2013
Posted by Daddy_O on Tuesday, May 07, 2019 7:05 AM

I agree. I think using the word "blame" is mischaracteriing the post.

Reality doesn't need blame, it is what it is.

However, I still think that the situation is being addressed by innovation. Options are tried and are either discarded or utilized. Good resin casters are so busy they can't keep up with demand. People kit bash, then sell the rest on eBay, though some try to rape you with the pricing. People change, that's what's happening. Maybe things will change again, we don't know. What I do know is that kids don't want to build models, but as they age perhaps they will. Meantime I'll just keep building away!

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Midwest
Posted by High octane on Tuesday, May 07, 2019 7:50 PM

I started plastic model kit buiding in the mid 50's as a hobby, my hobby and I still do it today. What happens to the hobby when I'm gone, I could care less as it was good for me. Times have changed drastically over the years and what people do with their spare time is quite different also. If you like buiding model cars, enjoy it and don't worry 'bout what the kids or younger generation does.

High octane

  • Member since
    February, 2004
  • From: nottingham,england
Posted by arcturus on Friday, May 10, 2019 1:04 PM

Geeze, why is everyone accusing this of being a negative subject ? 

The term blame isn't always used in a witch hunt type of way. An example of the meaning 'to blame' I found on an online dictionary sums it up perfectly.
 Being the cause or source of something: freak storm was to blame for the power outage.

So, looking for the source of why something is happening, whether it's the model companies or public buying or leisure habits.

You see, this is a bit like turning a negative into a positive.  Or like criticism or negative feedback. It's not always a bad thing. Making mistakes isn't a negative thing. This is how we learn and progress through making mistakes, through criticism, or negative feedback. 






Because unlike some Robin hoods,I can speak with an english accent...
  • Member since
    February, 2004
  • From: nottingham,england
Posted by arcturus on Friday, May 10, 2019 7:01 PM

Treehugger Dave

I like the diverse opinions here, so I thought I'd add mine.

To me, it isn't just the model car building culture changing here in the U.S., the entire culture is changing - DRAMATICALLY, and I can't see that as necessarily a bad thing, it is simply changing.
Each new generation finds it's own interests and changes the culture slightly. Some call it "Progress". A sort of "Evolution".

Look at what's happening with the "Shopping Malls" all over the U.S. - thet're closing in droves. Look what happened when people started to leave their country side farms to go into the city when the industrial revolution began. What about how the horse and buggy days changed with the onset of the automobile, and how the radio industry changed with the invention of the T.V. - Life changed all over the U.S continuously.

Today, the newest generation of young people are losing interest in the automobile because they are concerned about their future and their childrens future because of polution and the earth changing. They feel more responsible for making good lifestyle choices and shopping on the internet helps them accomplish that and they drive less or call "UBER" less. Much of the new generation aren't even buying cars.

I don't see any reason to blame anyone or anything as some seem to think works for them. Why as humans do we always have to find fault. Is it to justify or explain the changes.

Why not stand back and look at how the whole world is changing, instead of living in your own little world, blind to all that is happening, missing much of what is really good?

YES, I do believe the model car world is changing and shrinking, and there will be more model car companies bought out as the loss of interest continues.

I think we have seen the "Golden Years" of model car building at it's peak and seen that pass as interests move to more electronics. This is the age of electronics and everyone want's the latest toys.

Like most of you I have a smart phone, a smart TV, and a computor. Their all wonderfull and fun to enjoy, and I wouldn't have all the kit's I have if it wasn't for the computor and Ebay.

We can all choose to live life half empty or half full. My glass is completely full. I enjoy life. 

I think model car building will be around a lot longer, but I also think it will continue to look differently as it continues to change and shrink and even less new kits are made available. 

I myself think it's inevetable, but we can choose to have fun with what we have and not ruin it by having an attitude that spoils our enjoyment of this wonderful hobby.

We're all part of history and I'm excited to see what comes next and be involved in it.

As I said, just my My 2 CentsSmile, Wink & Grin.

 



" Why as humans do we always have to find fault. Is it to justify or explain the changes."

To justify....so we can progress...... Look at cars. We got fed up with having steering wheels impaled into our foreheads during accidents, so we found a fault with the lack of safety in cars so we invented airbags and crumple zones. 

"Why not stand back and look at how the whole world is changing"

We do . It's changing through progression.....which is often caused by finding fault  with the way we live in the past and present. We don't change things that are pefectly fine. 

You see I hear this alot. People saying don't find faults, be positive ,find solutions. Sorry, but they come hand in hand. If you need a solution to something, then something is lacking in the first place or is not going right, and you can't sort that until you sort the faults out.

But I agree, interesting diverse opinion, such as you agreeing the model building scene is fading, and someone else says it isn't....which is kind of what I was looking for, not a theoretical lecture on whether we should use the term blame.

I don't necessarily think young people are loosing interest in the automobile because of climate change, and safety for their children. Younger generation seem to  be having less and less children. I think it's because cars aren't what they used to be. In the old days, you could pick one up cheap car, strip it down in your garage, and make a 400bhp rocket. Now, everything is computer based,cars just don't have that changable customising ability anymore. Also, cars have lost their character.
But having said that, it doesn't change peoples interests in old cars. People haven't stopped buying classical music or stopped being interested in classical music, just because Rap has been invented.
You say about not living in your own little world, but you should look outside of the US.
Hobby shops are closing in europe to, but also, companies like Revell should consider that theres more to their client base than the US. In europe, we crave big american saloon cars and station wagons. People are importing 4 door Newyorkers etc over to here.

But yes, I think we all enjoy our hobby, and we need it to progress for it to continue being enjoyable....and for that, going back to my original post, do the model companies need to expand their range or change it ?  Or like you say, are we as the public, not that bothered about cars anymore ?


Because unlike some Robin hoods,I can speak with an english accent...
  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Friday, May 10, 2019 11:46 PM

Arcturus, I have enjoyed your posts.

So here we are as men enjoying sharing our opinions and saving the world with our possible solutions, I'm sure Sears and J.C. Pennys would love to have some of the same answers your looking for, but, to me, as usual, TIME itself will be what makes the decision, as it has all down through history. Horses are no longer traveling down the main streets of this country, and we no longer burn candles in the evening to read by, and malls are closing almost faster than we can count.

I'm sure the candle makers tried to make fancier candles to compete with light bulbs, and the buggy manufacturers tried to make fancier buggies to compete with the cars, but we all know how that went. I have no candles or buggies.

So it doesn't matter if we blame someone or look for an answer as others have in the past, the result will be the same, as there are forces at work that will answer the question for us beyond our control. It's called the future and progress and change.

All we have to do is wait and TIME will tell.

Not a fatalest view, just my view of reality.

As usual...nothing more than a different view and my My 2 Cents!!

 

 

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    September, 2008
Posted by Lil Rebel on Sunday, May 12, 2019 11:52 AM

Iagree with Hi Octane, I started biulding models in 1950's (old f$^t) and I've watched the industry go from screw bottom, engine less, promo models thru the 60's with the sometimes trashed great detailed GT 40's to the high priced resin models of today. One thing I've noticed, is some people, no matter what, will point out how the roof line on this model is not exactly right or how the engine block has a hole in it,etc. Well all I have to say, is just build and enjoy. Part of the reason the younger generation will never try modeling, is all the complaining and not being able to build a model thats up to par with what they see online. Sometimes I build extreamly high detail models but for the most patr, I build to relax. Try building a model, out of the box, without all the after market or the out of production parts from 50 plus years of stash, while you sitting with your son or daughter, and teach them something. Be paitent, and let them enjoy just like we used to. Just venting

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  • From: Midwest
Posted by High octane on Sunday, May 12, 2019 3:18 PM

I agree with Lil Rebel, just ENJOY the hobby.

High octane

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  • From: Nevada
Posted by American185 on Sunday, May 12, 2019 4:33 PM

I completely agree with you. I blame a lot of this on culture, teens prefer wandering around with ipods attached to their heads like antennas, or sitting on laptops and computers all day long. The model car industry has long been out of touch with what the median adult or older adult wants to build. They seem to think releasing a Mustang or Camaro in a different style every 6 months is fantastic, and god bless those that buy them. I have two Mustangs in my collection and that is far more than enough. Never owned one or drove one so why bother building a kit of one if I never liked the car to begin with ?? The cars I like building are the land yachts of yesteryear, the big LTD, the Gran Torino, Chrysler 300, Cadillacs etc. All of which go for a fortune on ebay if you are lucky enough to find one. I knew after the mid 70's where this hobby was heading, when Johan and others stopped coming out with annuals and dealer promos. Nope, lets crank out some more Mustangs and Camaros, and sprinkle in some Malibu SS's too. Who cares ?? And Greenlight must be on to something as was stated by another poster. Two Colony Parks, wow !!! Now that excites me as I had one and my parents had two over the years. Awesome cars that looked great and were more eye pleasing than 90% of the SUV's and Crossovers on the road today. I wouldn't be caught dead driving a Suburban, Tahoe, or Expedition and the like. When gas gets near $4.00 again, sales will tank, and we will move on to the next fad vehicle type. Americans are fickle when it comes to automobiles and for the most part are 'me too' buyers of them. I worked for Ford long enough to know the research they did on what to push in ads and commercials. But todays cars are painfully ugly and offer nothing as far as elegance as they once did. A Focus, looks like a Fusion, which looks like a Kia, which looks like a Hyundai. Individuality and styling have long gone out the window with the car companies, they now all copy each other. And the good manufacturers are gone, Oldsmobile and Mercury. Best selling car of the 80's was the Cutlass Supreme, and the best selling nameplate of all time was Grand Marquis. And sadly that is the way the hobby shop is going as well. The great ones folding up, leaving us with little choice but online, or driving two hours to get to a mega hobby shop that carries nothing of interest but paint supplies and lots of slot car stuff. And although some of you say, wagons and 4 doors won't sell as kits, think again. A Colony Park would, Modelhaus proved that and they didn't give it away either. As would an Electra Estate or Gran Fury Sport Suburban. And a Marquis is an easy knockoff of an LTD. Change hood, nose, bumpers, rear lights, and maybe one or two character lines and there you go. The 75-78 was easiest. But we will surely be blessed with many more Firebirds, Mustangs, Camaros, and Malibu SS's before that ever happens........

'There is a special feel in an Oldsmobile, more than the luxury ride its the feeling of pride that you get inside !!!Wink'

  • Member since
    February, 2011
Posted by Dwights55 on Monday, May 13, 2019 8:12 AM

First  let me say, I'm not an expert.  But, years ago, it took untold man hours to make a mold for a model.  In todays world we have CNC machines and computer programs that make life easier.  Am I wrong in assuming that any model car mold would require much less effort to design and build?    

Another thing I've noticed, (related to original post) is model car companies seemed to stop doing the everyday cars that most people drive, other than the afore mentioned Camaros and Mustangs.  I would dearly love a new Malibu, Impala, Chrysler 300 or just about any othr American made car.  Isn't the reason we started building "our" generation cars is because Mom and Dad drove one just like it? 

Most of my money goes for bow-ties, bikes and babes.  The rest I just waste.

  • Member since
    September, 2015
  • From: Nevada
Posted by American185 on Monday, May 13, 2019 9:41 AM

So well put. You hit the nail on the head. Cars mom and dad drove and now us too. My parents were practical and knew that a Camaro or Mustang or Firebird or Charger was useless to them. We had the big Chrysler, Ford Torino, and Granda as well as the Pinto. Now sprinkle in an LTD, Grand Marquis, and Delta 88 and you pretty much round out my family rides. But the model companies are obsessed with sports cars only. So sad, as I much rather build a base Duster or Delta 88, than any sports car. Took forever for Revell to release a Cutlass model. Was an easy conversion to a Supreme or Supreme Brougham. Same with the Gran Torino. Became a Brougham easily. But as some have said, no one wants these. Couldn't be more wrong. Why not the 77-79 T-Bird, only the best selling Thunderbird of all time !! Nope, lets do another Mustang, what the world wants.

'There is a special feel in an Oldsmobile, more than the luxury ride its the feeling of pride that you get inside !!!Wink'

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