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Vinyl tops

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  • Member since
    October, 2008
  • From: Kennesaw, GA
Vinyl tops
Posted by nick63 on Saturday, December 01, 2018 11:32 PM

The easiest and most realistic way to make a vinyl top is to take some textured material which you may find on a 3 ring notebook binder that has the feel of leather. Generally it will have a foam backing. Cut out a section and gently remove the backing. Cut into 3 pieces, one for the center and two for the sides. Glue with Elmers white glue. When dry, paint with brush flat black. You have the seams and it is realistic.  Forget adding plastic strips or using textured paint. Trust me, this is the best way to do it.

  • Member since
    February, 2016
Posted by Plowboy on Sunday, December 02, 2018 9:04 AM

Photos?

  • Member since
    October, 2008
  • From: Kennesaw, GA
Posted by nick63 on Sunday, December 02, 2018 9:53 PM

 Could not download photo when I posted about vinyl top. I sent 2 photos to the Gallery so watch for it there. 69 Camaro, blue with black top. Penske #9 race car scratch built.

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Nashua, New Hampshire
Posted by mrmike on Monday, December 03, 2018 7:33 AM

You will need a photohosting site like IMGUR or Fotki so you can post pictures on this forum.  Do a search for photo hosting sites and select the one that fits your needs.  Upload your pictures, copy the IMG code and paste it on your reply on the forum.  Click "SUBMIT YOUR REPLY" and your picture should appear.  

"That's Spenser with an 'S' like the poet."

Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985

On my bench-'67 Foose Dodge Coronet; 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 302

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
    October, 2008
Posted by oldcarguy on Wednesday, December 19, 2018 12:26 PM

Hmmm;

 Now here's one .I found an " Embossing Paint" that leaves a texture on the surface . I was using it for carpet and tried it on a top .can you believe it looked okay ? I Don't have a picture but it looks hmmm , okay I guess .Gonna try this stuff with different patterns on scrap .

gjgeracci
  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Wednesday, December 19, 2018 6:27 PM

Paint works fine for me.

Doesn't need to be texture paint.

Plain old flat enamel shot from a distance will do the trick.

You have to remember, we are building in 1/25th scale.

anything that has more texture than 1/25th the size the real article is out of scale.

 

 

 

 

Steve

 

  • Member since
    February, 2016
Posted by Plowboy on Thursday, December 20, 2018 12:20 PM

This doesn't seem much different than the masking tape method. I did one many years ago and surprisingly, it's held up well. It looks OK. But, it's not really to scale. Unless the binder cover is super thin, I can't see it being much better than masking tape.

The biggest offender I see on the vast majority of vinyl tops is out of scale laps. The lap on a full scale car is only the thickness of the vinyl and maybe 3/4 of an inch wide. Divide those by 25 and that's what the lap should be. Which would be .005 thick by .030 wide. That could be accomplished by simply lapping the paint. 

I'm experimenting with a convertible top trying to get the texture it needs. It had glue spots that caused me to have to sand the whole thing smooth. If my idea works, I'll post the results and the method used.  

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Thursday, December 20, 2018 1:41 PM

Plowboy

This doesn't seem much different than the masking tape method. I did one many years ago and surprisingly, it's held up well. It looks OK. But, it's not really to scale. Unless the binder cover is super thin, I can't see it being much better than masking tape.

The biggest offender I see on the vast majority of vinyl tops is out of scale laps. The lap on a full scale car is only the thickness of the vinyl and maybe 3/4 of an inch wide. Divide those by 25 and that's what the lap should be. Which would be .005 thick by .030 wide. That could be accomplished by simply lapping the paint. 

I'm experimenting with a convertible top trying to get the texture it needs. It had glue spots that caused me to have to sand the whole thing smooth. If my idea works, I'll post the results and the method used.  

 

I use .007 clear "lay film" for the over lap on my vinyl tops.

You're correct.

The thinner the better.

I still struggle with that one.

You're also correct about the masking tape method.

I've seen some done this way that look too heavily textured in my opinion.

Another draw back to using tape or other thin materials glued on for vinyl tops is getting the transition, or gap, between the vinyl and the chrome trim to look right.

Much easier with paint.

I use flat enamel paint shot from a bit of a distance to give a slight orange peel texture and then use the "oil of your fingers" technique to rub over the flat paint to give the vinyl a slight sheen.

This is another issue that I see periodically with vinyl tops.

Either too flat, or too shiny.

 

 

Steve

  • Member since
    October, 2008
Posted by oldcarguy on Friday, December 21, 2018 11:02 AM

Steve ;

 Excellent suggestion .I have been doing that for years on interiors too .Want a worn shiny look on a seat ?Rub your fingers over it in the pattern of someone getting in and out of the seat and Viola ! Used looking seat ! O.C.G.

gjgeracci
  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Friday, December 21, 2018 5:10 PM

oldcarguy

Steve ;

 Excellent suggestion .I have been doing that for years on interiors too .Want a worn shiny look on a seat ?Rub your fingers over it in the pattern of someone getting in and out of the seat and Viola ! Used looking seat ! O.C.G.

 

Absolutely.

I use the same technique on everything from vinyl & convertible tops, to interiors and even chassis.

It helps give a just slightly weathered look to any parts painted with flat paint.

 

 

Steve

 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    February, 2004
  • From: nottingham,england
Posted by arcturus on Sunday, December 23, 2018 11:12 AM

I found just using two very thin plastic strips, spraying the top with a satin colour, leave it for about 10-20 seconds, and then when the paint is tacky, drum your finger tips on it repeatedly, going over and over it. Creates a rough texture.

Because unlike some Robin hoods,I can speak with an english accent...
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by cruz missile on Wednesday, January 02, 2019 1:51 PM

 Hosted on Fotki

 

Still prefer the texture paint....

  • Member since
    October, 2008
  • From: Kennesaw, GA
Posted by nick63 on Friday, January 04, 2019 12:19 AM

Goofy62
That is nice.
 

Goofy62

Paint works fine for me.

Doesn't need to be texture paint.

Plain old flat enamel shot from a distance will do the trick.

You have to remember, we are building in 1/25th scale.

anything that has more texture than 1/25th the size the real article is out of scale.

 

 

 

 

Steve

 

 

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