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What are your go to paints?

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  • Member since
    April, 2018
What are your go to paints?
Posted by jchrisf on Saturday, July 07, 2018 8:53 AM

Just curious what paints you always have on hand that you generally use for every build but even those that are your favorites when a special need arises?

  • Member since
    February, 2018
Posted by TonyO on Saturday, July 07, 2018 9:19 AM

Are you asking what colors or what brand, or both?

  • Member since
    April, 2018
Posted by jchrisf on Saturday, July 07, 2018 9:36 AM

Both actually.. like a certain gloss or flat black, etc.

I find that some brands and colors cover better than others in my limited experience.  Someone on YT had recommended Model Master Silver Chrome enamel and that stuff is awesome for brush painting.  I'd have never found it if he didn't say that everyone needs a bottle.  So, you know, your staples like that.

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by 195X on Saturday, July 07, 2018 11:16 AM

I tend to keep certain MOPAR colors on hand and I use automotive paints almost exclusively. Mostly HOK or Dupont. I mix my own colors when necessary.

I also tend to keep Tamiya clear gloss, Krylon satin black (although the same effect can be achieved with flat black and gloss coat, I just don't have the time for that!) and an array of cheap flats in black, gray and white, depending on the base I need.

I also keep a set of Createx pearls and neons on hand for those special paint jobs.

Finally, I will NEVER be out of Molotow liquid chrome!!

My favorite color is clear. I am also ambidexterous, I can screw up equally well with either hand. I am 53 years old and been building for most of that time. :)

On the bench... somewhere. Pink Panther show car, 1978 Dodge Magnum Charger Daytona Midnight edition SE 300. Mongrel T.

  • Member since
    February, 2018
Posted by TonyO on Saturday, July 07, 2018 12:22 PM
For spray paint I use Tamiya TS or Model Master Lacquer, depending on the color. I also prefer Tamiya gloss and semi gloss clears. For brushing I go with Model Master Acrylic for just about everything except Tamiya clear red and clear orange for lenses and reflectors and Model Master Lacquer Silver bottle for touch-ups.
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  • Member since
    December, 2017
Posted by Dale Gribble on Saturday, July 07, 2018 1:10 PM

as I hate when clear  goes bad , I switched up to spray max 2k clear . Just make sure to have a few bodies ready to clear at once because the pot life is about 36 hours once activated ....

 

i I use duplicolor and testors lacquers for color , occasional I'll have a half pint of a special color mixed and spray in a touch up gun , but 95% is all spray can . 

Molotow chrome pens - the best hands down for cleaning up those pesky feed tags on chrome parts , or mirror faces ... 

And who can't forget good ol .99 cent spray cans for overall chassis and interior paint ? A few cans of both flat and gloss in white and black go a LONG way on a lot of builds . throw in some matte clear for another variance . 

 

 

"rare" kit? no such thing!

build it, dont let it sit on the shelf.....

you cant take it with you, hearses dont have luggage racks......

  • Member since
    March, 2011
Posted by gulftarpon on Saturday, July 07, 2018 1:25 PM

I use spray cans rather than an airbrush I use Duplicolor sandable primers for every build. As far as paints, I use Tamiya, Testor's Model Masters or occasionally Duplicolor spray. For interiors I like Testor's water-based bottle paints.

  • Member since
    April, 2018
Posted by jchrisf on Saturday, July 07, 2018 3:36 PM

Thanks everyone.. this is very helpful.  

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Midwest
Posted by High octane on Saturday, July 07, 2018 9:51 PM

I got rid of my air-brushes and compressor as I prefer the "shake 'n spray" method of painting. I use Tamiya, Testors, Black Gold, MCW, and Dupli-Color and find them all compatible with each other.

High octane

  • Member since
    March, 2008
  • From: Canada
Posted by smellyfatdude on Sunday, July 08, 2018 1:40 AM

When I contemplate what color to paint any build, I always ask myself two questions.

1. is there a Testors one coat lacquer I can use?

2. do I have that color on hand?

 

As much as I love Tamiya paints, I've never had a bad result with any of the one coat flavors.

 

introducing a leaner, fresher smellyfatdude 

Next builds:

Dunno

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2018
Posted by jchrisf on Sunday, July 08, 2018 11:39 AM

Dale Gribble

as I hate when clear  goes bad , I switched up to spray max 2k clear . Just make sure to have a few bodies ready to clear at once because the pot life is about 36 hours once activated ....

Dale, that would be perfect if it lasted longer than 36 hours because I only do one car at a time.  It is a bit pricey but if the shelf like was longer it would be worth it.  Guess if I go the 2K clear way I will have to get it in seperate containers so I can mix it myself.

  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Burleson, Texas
Posted by ModelTexan on Sunday, July 08, 2018 7:25 PM
During the "paint scare" of 1997 when we were about to be forced to use acrylics only I experimented with craft store paints. I learned some techniques to spray them and eventually came to love using them. I use acrylics gloss clear or "Future" to create a gloss coat since most of them are flat paints and the gloss choices are limited. Love them so much I never went back!
Oops. Oh, well it'll buff out...maybe...
Moderator
  • Member since
    December, 2017
Posted by Dale Gribble on Sunday, July 08, 2018 8:18 PM

jchrisf

 

 
Dale Gribble

as I hate when clear  goes bad , I switched up to spray max 2k clear . Just make sure to have a few bodies ready to clear at once because the pot life is about 36 hours once activated ....

 

Dale, that would be perfect if it lasted longer than 36 hours because I only do one car at a time.  It is a bit pricey but if the shelf like was longer it would be worth it.  Guess if I go the 2K clear way I will have to get it in seperate containers so I can mix it myself.

 

 

 If you do that just purchase a quart of clearcoat, and several of the half pints of activator....  they will go bad pretty quickly but the clear has a pretty much indefinite Shelf life ... 

"rare" kit? no such thing!

build it, dont let it sit on the shelf.....

you cant take it with you, hearses dont have luggage racks......

  • Member since
    November, 2016
Posted by bluenote75 on Monday, July 09, 2018 8:47 AM

I use:

- Tamiya enamels for brush painting.  I import them via Ebay from Japan and they are fantastic!  I used to always use Modelmaster enamels, but they are constantly discontinuing colours and I find they sometimes dry up in the bottle long before they should.

- Tamiya acrylics for airbrushing.  I like this for airbrushing planes, sci-fi, car interiors, etc.  Low odor, easy to use, easy to clean up.

- Scalefinishes for car/motorcycle bodies.  These are very easy to use, and they have any colour you need.  

  • Member since
    April, 2018
Posted by jchrisf on Monday, July 09, 2018 9:44 AM

bluenote75

I use:

- Tamiya enamels for brush painting.  I import them via Ebay from Japan and they are fantastic!  I used to always use Modelmaster enamels, but they are constantly discontinuing colours and I find they sometimes dry up in the bottle long before they should.

- Tamiya acrylics for airbrushing.  I like this for airbrushing planes, sci-fi, car interiors, etc.  Low odor, easy to use, easy to clean up.

- Scalefinishes for car/motorcycle bodies.  These are very easy to use, and they have any colour you need.  

 

What Tamiya enamels and acrylic colors do you have and use on a regular basis?  I know SA's Dave Thibodeau uses Tamiya enamels for some brush painting so they must be good because he also doesn't recommend enamels because the never dry.  So Tamiya's must be on a different caliber.  He also brushes a lot of Model Master's Lacquer Silver.

  • Member since
    November, 2016
Posted by bluenote75 on Monday, July 09, 2018 10:53 AM

jchrisf

 I typically use Black, flat black, gold, silver, etc for Tamiya enamels.  Basically engine colours, brakes, details colours.  Anything that is small.

I love how Tamiya enamels brush, very smooth.  The colour selection isn't the best (around 80), but it fits my needs.  

 
bluenote75

I use:

- Tamiya enamels for brush painting.  I import them via Ebay from Japan and they are fantastic!  I used to always use Modelmaster enamels, but they are constantly discontinuing colours and I find they sometimes dry up in the bottle long before they should.

- Tamiya acrylics for airbrushing.  I like this for airbrushing planes, sci-fi, car interiors, etc.  Low odor, easy to use, easy to clean up.

- Scalefinishes for car/motorcycle bodies.  These are very easy to use, and they have any colour you need.  

 

 

 

What Tamiya enamels and acrylic colors do you have and use on a regular basis?  I know SA's Dave Thibodeau uses Tamiya enamels for some brush painting so they must be good because he also doesn't recommend enamels because the never dry.  So Tamiya's must be on a different caliber.  He also brushes a lot of Model Master's Lacquer Silver.

 

  • Member since
    April, 2018
Posted by jchrisf on Friday, July 13, 2018 1:49 PM

ModelTexan
During the "paint scare" of 1997 when we were about to be forced to use acrylics only I experimented with craft store paints. I learned some techniques to spray them and eventually came to love using them. I use acrylics gloss clear or "Future" to create a gloss coat since most of them are flat paints and the gloss choices are limited. Love them so much I never went back!
 

I've used craft acyrilics and liked them a lot but they are very fragile and chipped off too easy.  Couldn't get a good gloss out of them on the body with any of the varnishes I tried.  I've heard Duplicolor's Acrylic Enamel clear coat works with them and might have to try that someday.

 

  • Member since
    July, 2018
  • From: Michigan, U.S.A.
Posted by Jimmy D. on Tuesday, July 17, 2018 10:16 AM

I like Testor's enamels and Tamiya lacquers for most things. I've found that cheap craft paint works pretty well in areas where you want a really flat, lusterless finish like for carpeting or in underbody areas. Floquil paints are no longer available and that's a shame. Floquil Engine Black is a perfect shade for black interiors. Floquil metallics were great too, they dryed fairly fast and were pretty durable, even under masking tape. Another great paint was Polly Scale acrylic. Poly Scale clear satin is the perfect topcoat for simulating leather / vinyl interiors and accents. Fortunately, I managed to acquire a good stock of both Floquil and Polly Scale paints before they went down. I've recently started using nail polish, cut about 60% with cheap lacquer thinner and have had excellent results. Hat tip and special thanks to Mr. Vern Heizer. I've also recently started using Molotow Chrome pens for touchups and they rock!

Jimmy D.

  • Member since
    November, 2004
  • From: UK
Posted by PatrickW on Thursday, July 19, 2018 1:40 AM

I'm a rattle can man, I don't like all the fussing with airbrushes. So I use Plasti-Kote enamels and Humbrol Acrylics, both of which I buy from Hobbycraft when I visit Milton Keynes. Or I buy online from either Models For Sale, Grand Prix Models and Hiroboy. 

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: Chico, CA
Posted by Wick Humble on Wednesday, August 01, 2018 11:47 AM

I started modelling with Pactra and Testors brush bottles (Aurora too, if I don't disremember) and stuff out of our garage shelf, all solvent based.  Then I discovered rattle-cans; what a miracle for an elementary school modeler!

Since I've grown up (73 yoa) I've relied on real automotive materials, preferably PPG, as in retirement I worked for our local Platinum dealer, and been very happy. Now, I agree that being in the mixing room is an advantage, and the knowledge that comes of professional training too, but anyone who has a Harbor Freight finger gun or mini-gun can do very nice work with 1:1 type finishes.  I have two very nice top-line Japanes air brushes, but only use them for fading, etc. I don't hava a grudge against Tamaya, or any of the other hobby-specific suppliers; they are the backbone of the entire scale modeling hobby.  As a former car-mag writer, I know that our hobby pubs must support their advertisers; the First Commandment! But with a few exceptions, I don't trust aerosols (and I've mixed and filled many!!!) for spray pattern, paint quality, and color choice (See below*).  Though both enamels and lacquers were sometimes available 'back in the day' they often were of marginal quality, and our spray jobs reflected this.  I have a number of kits I built in Jr. Hi/Hi School, c. 1960, that still don't look bad; they just don't look real good, and I used whatever was available.  We lived in a very rural town (moo! baa!) in N.Cal, and like most teens, I was usually broke (saving for my first 1:1 car, a 1955 Chevy DelRay 2-dr sedan; 265, 3/4 cam, 4-bbl, 'Vette 3-speed, etc. Very quick, in that idiom) and trying to have enough for a Coke (or Lucky Lager) to say nothing of prom dates!  Couldn't afford much for paint, guns, etc.

Do consider using 'real' car finishes; but be smart -- make friends with the gang at your local PPG, Axalta, Sikkens, Akso/Nobel, or whatever store.  Don't bug them when they are busy!  Mid-week, mid PM is best for slack times at the counter.  Show them one of your good models -- this even for kids!  You wouldn't believe the 'scrap' or mix-mixed colors they generate, and often offer for half-price, or even for free!  If you like the new hues, they have 'em, and often take a few tries to satisfy the body shop customers; what is returned or scrapped is spectacular.  Of course, you will need to establish your paint system to reflect their specs; there are many different grades of product (PPG has dozens!) that require specific hardeners, activators, and solvents.  But you can also go basic, if you don't mind some limitiations in colors available; at PPG, the Shopline JE (enamel, if you want to remember it that way) is the cheapest, and can be applied without any additives -- other than reducing for good spray and coverage -- or hardener (catalyst) added.  Best of all, this grade can be custom mixed from any color in their master computer (available in that grade) and put into a *rattle-can, if you desire it.  Our store does this for less than $25 per can, and you also get the left-overs in a pint can for other work.  (Refused partial-pints is where I acquired most of my absolutely gratis colors, including Plum Crazy and other radical hues!)  The basecoat/clearcoat (JB) grades are great, and easy to use.  As another reply mentioned, the clears stay good for quite a long time, but all require catalysts; don't forget that keeping the cats well sealed, and cool will often prolong their useful life.  I keep an old mini-fridge in my 1:1 shop for that purpose.  Clear cats are spendy!

I very seldom use rattle cans, except for some high-build primers. I rely on epoxy primer (catalyzed) on my styrene kits, saving a number of projects to spray in one bunch, which saves materials, generally.  Good epoxy is the ideal sealer for plastics, even versus hot lacquers, and can fill a lot of sand scratches!  It is very stable when cured, and can be recoated infinitely, if done properly. It really enhances the body work on a radical Kustom lead-sled, smoothing down every seam and modification!  And the low-gloss black epoxy is hard and just matte enough for rat-rods and chassis too.  Just be sure you have a great mask, and plenty of free-moving air; I would never shoot this stuff in my house!  Gloves are a must, as well; don't want you washing your mitts off in lacquer thinner; goes to the liver in 30-seconds, folks!

Oh yeah; when mooching scrap and mis-tints, it def. helps to be a big person, or if a kid, ask an adult who is savvy to go with you as responsible party.  Paint shops are very aware of liability issues, and under-18s may not get the goodies.

So, these are the paints I always have on hand and use for every build; so far they've fit every need except the fiddly little details that must be brushed.  I'm resto-modding dad's old '51 Chevy 2-door for my son (was his hi-school car) and saved a gallon of PPG Duracryl (DuPont acrylic lac was the original finish) Green metallic polychromatic to re-shoot it in; I'm doing a resin body '51 kit to emulate the proto as a surprise, and will do it in that lac over epoxy primer/surfacer.  Some fun!!

Any questions?

Wick [Yes, I used to get paid by the word!  Why do you ask?]

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