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Question: de-chroming (the yellow stuff under the chrome).

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  • Member since
    February, 2018
Question: de-chroming (the yellow stuff under the chrome).
Posted by lacquer-lover on Monday, March 19, 2018 6:43 AM

Hi Guys, Tried de-chroming some  parts (used both EZ-off and Bleche-White). Parts have been sitting for several days in the Bleche White... The chrome is gone but there is a yellow residue in places. I assume this is a clear paint of some sort. How do I get this stuff off? Do I need to use something stronger as a de-chromer?  Thanks

Current Projects:

AMT 1/25 67 Impala SS

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Nashua, New Hampshire
Posted by mrmike on Monday, March 19, 2018 7:15 AM

That yellow stuff is a lacquer undercoat that is used for chrome plating.  In my experience, some of that undercoat comes off when I use Easy-Off Oven Cleaner.  I only use Bleche-Wite for cleaning the mold release agent from resin.  The lacquer undercoat is difficult to remove and if you are intent on removing it, wash your parts of the Easy-Off, let them dry, and soak in Easy-Off again for a day or two.  That might help remove the undercoat.

"That's Spenser with an 'S' like the poet." Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985

On my bench-LAPD 1978 Plymouth Fury; 1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Monday, March 19, 2018 8:47 AM

I use Super Clean for removing chrome & I very rarely ever have this problem.

An over night soak will usually take it down to pristine plastic.

 

Steve

  • Member since
    February, 2018
Posted by lacquer-lover on Monday, March 19, 2018 9:07 AM

Thanks mrmike, are you saying I don't have to remove this lacquer? Won't it show through the rechromed part?

Current Projects:

AMT 1/25 67 Impala SS

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Nashua, New Hampshire
Posted by mrmike on Monday, March 19, 2018 2:41 PM

It shouldn't show at all.  Remember, this is the stuff that is used for the chrome plating process by kit manufacturers.  Usually for me, a lot of the lacquer undercoat is removed when I use Easy-Off Oven Cleaner.  I know that on older AMT and MPC kits, the undercoating can be rather thick and not easily removed.  If the undercoating is thick enough to distort the part, then by all means, remove it!  Wash off the old cleaner, dry the parts and re-soak with whatever cleaner you use.

"That's Spenser with an 'S' like the poet." Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985

On my bench-LAPD 1978 Plymouth Fury; 1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
    February, 2018
Posted by TonyO on Monday, March 19, 2018 3:40 PM

Goofy62

I use Super Clean for removing chrome & I very rarely ever have this problem.

An over night soak will usually take it down to pristine plastic.

 

Steve

 

I do the same as well. I would also suggest using Super Clean and not Purple Power. Many guys believe that Purple Power is the same as Super Clean but it's not, Super Clean is stronger and does a better job. On some very rare occasions you might need to soak your parts for a couple of days to remove all of the clear undercoat.

  • Member since
    April, 2012
Posted by litespeedsae on Monday, March 19, 2018 5:15 PM

lacquer-lover

Hi Guys, Tried de-chroming some  parts (used both EZ-off and Bleche-White). Parts have been sitting for several days in the Bleche White... The chrome is gone but there is a yellow residue in places. I assume this is a clear paint of some sort. How do I get this stuff off? Do I need to use something stronger as a de-chromer?  Thanks

 

lacquer-lover

Hi Guys, Tried de-chroming some  parts (used both EZ-off and Bleche-White). Parts have been sitting for several days in the Bleche White... The chrome is gone but there is a yellow residue in places. I assume this is a clear paint of some sort. How do I get this stuff off? Do I need to use something stronger as a de-chromer?  Thanks

 

I have been lucky to simply paint over the yellowed surface. Also, there are times that I find the existing chrome to be good but a bit too bright.When that occurs, I spray over it with  satin finish acrylic clear ratlle can.

Little Rock, Arkansas

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Ohio
Posted by HineMotors on Monday, March 19, 2018 5:48 PM

I have been using regular old bleach with great results, the one bumper shows yellow I believe you are talking about and it is a clear lacquer coat. I find it intertesting the many different colors of plastic used under the chrome plating. The yellow bumper lacquer coat appears to be sloppy with some "Hangers" (painters slang) which would show up once chromed and look kinda uneven. It is kinda nice to breathe new life into old worn and faded parts IMHO.

  • Member since
    February, 2018
Posted by lacquer-lover on Monday, March 19, 2018 6:00 PM

Thanks for all the good advice everyone !

Current Projects:

AMT 1/25 67 Impala SS

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Tuesday, March 20, 2018 1:40 AM

I would absolutely do my best to make sure that the old under coat is removed.

There are two reasons for this.

First, any residue left will be impregnated with the solvent that you used for stripping making it unstable.

The residue could "lift" during the rechroming process leaving you with wrinkles or flaking of the new chrome.

Most after market chromers will probably not guarantee results if the part is not thoroughly cleaned.

Second, the chromer will re-spray the undercoat, doubling the amount & making it too thick, resulting in detail hide.

If you're having issues with removing undercoat, I would recommend picking up some Super Clean.

It's not that expensive, can be used over & over again, is easy to dispose of, and can be picked up at virtually any well stocked auto parts store.

It also makes a terrific paint remover.

I recently stripped a multiple coat automotive lacquer paint job on a Johan '65 Plymouth Fury completely after soaking for a couple of days.

 

Steve

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