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Research

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  • Member since
    May, 2013
Research
Posted by Digital_Cowboy on Sunday, October 15, 2017 1:33 PM

How much and what kind of research do you do prior to building a kit?

---------------------------------
Digital Cowboy
Live Long and Prosper
On the bench: Star Trek: Romulan Bird of Prey; 1964 Ford Fairlane

  • Member since
    December, 2005
  • From: Upstate New York
Posted by spencer1984 on Sunday, October 15, 2017 5:40 PM

Since I build TV/movie cars, there's usually a lot of leeway to get things "right." Even ignoring stunt cars, beauty cars, models, CGI stand-ins, etc., there's often a discrepancy between what we see and what actually existed.

So I try to research enough to make my models plausible within their universe(s). For example, the '66 TV Batmobile: in reality it had the same tired old Ford engine it had as a show car back in the '50s, but Batman and Robin would always start it up with "atomic batteries to power, turbines to speed." So I read through old literature on atomic engines, looked at material on military aircraft of the era, pulled from some general engineering concepts, and came up with a design that I felt fit the car, the era, and the in-universe mythology.

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Sunday, October 15, 2017 9:08 PM

Basically, I research in stages as I build.

I start with colors & body modifications that need to be done because I start with the body.

Next I start looking for interior info, then engine, etc.

Most of my research consists of looking for photos of the 1:1 online.

 

Steve

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Midwest
Posted by High octane on Sunday, October 15, 2017 10:55 PM

Research depends on what I'm building and how accurate I plan on building it as I build for FUN. Street machines or Day 2 cars and gassers, I need little to no research as I was driving and drag racing back in the mid-60's and that's what most of my models are. However I'm building a few factory stock models and I do research my subjects as I like to get them fairly close to being a good rendition of a convertible, hardtop, or whatever else I have in mind like a drag boat, a tourist travel van/truck, etc. I no longer enter model contest and build in my own "comfort zone."

High octane

  • Member since
    November, 2004
  • From: UK
Posted by PatrickW on Monday, October 16, 2017 2:18 AM

I always Google search for images of the vehicle I'm looking at building. Stance, colour, setting, modifications ( wheels, bodywork,seats) and possible decals. I then look in the cabin to see what paints, and colours I have, or paint what colour(s) I particularly like to see. 

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Monday, October 16, 2017 7:42 AM

Google images is a researcher's dream. I have a huge pile of old magazines in the basement, most bought in the late 70s, 80s and 90s. I held on to these primarily for research for model projects, especially the muscle car and Mustang magazines of the 90s, and Super Stock magazine for my drag racing projects. And I would search for old magazines at swap meets for info/photos to support future projects of specific cars. Preparing for a model project often meant several evenings of pouring through piles of magazines looking for the photos I needed, and usually falling down some rabbit holes while at it.

Then this internet thing came along quickly followed by Google's image search, and now an evening at the computer I can find dozens of the precise photos I need, sometimes in high resolution, and often showing the obscure details and options that I am looking for. In colour too, which the magazine photos frequently lacked. Though of course I usually fall down a few rabbit holes while I'm at it.

Power matters in the straights.
Lightness matters everywhere. - Colin Chapman

Trevor

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Nashua, New Hampshire
Posted by mrmike on Monday, October 16, 2017 9:30 AM

For me, research depends upon how much I need to do for any given model.  If I have an idea and I need to find out more, then I use Google, Google Images, and books in my library.  I have several books that I can reference for information.  The internet is at my fingertips (ha-ha) with my laptop sitting next to me at the bench.  Sometimes, I throw caution to the wind and do very little to no research at all!  

"That's Spenser with an 'S' like the poet." Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985 

On my bench-Foose Ford FD100 Pickup; 1969 Plymouth Road Runner

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Monday, October 16, 2017 9:37 AM

This is a good thread for me because I'm a "Research Guy" - Love doing research because I get so educated and learn so much.

That to me is part of the fun of model building.

Research for me usually begins by focusing on what style of car I'm going to build. Convertible, hardtop, two door or foor door. Next is color combinations and what looks good on a particular car. I also like to focus on the interior style, trim and colors, and of coarse the engine colors and types of engines, and all the details, if the car is going to be fairly stock. I build a lot of those now. The research is a lot of fun.

I photograph all that on the computor screen and download them into this huge digital library I have for referance later, and quite a few times will print out photographs and put them with the kit and add a note to myself that tells me where the pics are in my digital library. So easy to find that way if I need other details to help me later.

I love Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions and what would I do without Ebay.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    May, 2013
Posted by Digital_Cowboy on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 10:48 AM

spencer1984

Since I build TV/movie cars, there's usually a lot of leeway to get things "right." Even ignoring stunt cars, beauty cars, models, CGI stand-ins, etc., there's often a discrepancy between what we see and what actually existed.

So I try to research enough to make my models plausible within their universe(s). For example, the '66 TV Batmobile: in reality it had the same tired old Ford engine it had as a show car back in the '50s, but Batman and Robin would always start it up with "atomic batteries to power, turbines to speed." So I read through old literature on atomic engines, looked at material on military aircraft of the era, pulled from some general engineering concepts, and came up with a design that I felt fit the car, the era, and the in-universe mythology.

 

Yep, those "poor" cars in most of our favorite shows sure did take a beating.  If I'm not mistaken the General shown in the begining of Dukes of Hazard had it's suspension "killed" when it lands, yet The General was on of the stars of the show.

---------------------------------
Digital Cowboy
Live Long and Prosper
On the bench: Star Trek: Romulan Bird of Prey; 1964 Ford Fairlane

  • Member since
    May, 2013
Posted by Digital_Cowboy on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 10:49 AM

Goofy62

Basically, I research in stages as I build.

I start with colors & body modifications that need to be done because I start with the body.

Next I start looking for interior info, then engine, etc.

Most of my research consists of looking for photos of the 1:1 online.

 

Steve

 

That sounds like a good way to do things.

---------------------------------
Digital Cowboy
Live Long and Prosper
On the bench: Star Trek: Romulan Bird of Prey; 1964 Ford Fairlane

  • Member since
    May, 2013
Posted by Digital_Cowboy on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 11:17 AM

High octane

Research depends on what I'm building and how accurate I plan on building it as I build for FUN. Street machines or Day 2 cars and gassers, I need little to no research as I was driving and drag racing back in the mid-60's and that's what most of my models are. However I'm building a few factory stock models and I do research my subjects as I like to get them fairly close to being a good rendition of a convertible, hardtop, or whatever else I have in mind like a drag boat, a tourist travel van/truck, etc. I no longer enter model contest and build in my own "comfort zone."

 

Building should always be for fun and for ourselves first.  Unless one is a professional builder.

Contests can be fun, and a great oppurtunity to meet other builders and pick up new techniques.

---------------------------------
Digital Cowboy
Live Long and Prosper
On the bench: Star Trek: Romulan Bird of Prey; 1964 Ford Fairlane

  • Member since
    May, 2013
Posted by Digital_Cowboy on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 11:18 AM

PatrickW

I always Google search for images of the vehicle I'm looking at building. Stance, colour, setting, modifications ( wheels, bodywork,seats) and possible decals. I then look in the cabin to see what paints, and colours I have, or paint what colour(s) I particularly like to see. 

 

I especially agree with the last part.  If I don't like the color on the box I'll paint it a color that I particularly like.

---------------------------------
Digital Cowboy
Live Long and Prosper
On the bench: Star Trek: Romulan Bird of Prey; 1964 Ford Fairlane

  • Member since
    May, 2013
Posted by Digital_Cowboy on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 11:23 AM

Bainford

Google images is a researcher's dream. I have a huge pile of old magazines in the basement, most bought in the late 70s, 80s and 90s. I held on to these primarily for research for model projects, especially the muscle car and Mustang magazines of the 90s, and Super Stock magazine for my drag racing projects. And I would search for old magazines at swap meets for info/photos to support future projects of specific cars. Preparing for a model project often meant several evenings of pouring through piles of magazines looking for the photos I needed, and usually falling down some rabbit holes while at it.

Then this internet thing came along quickly followed by Google's image search, and now an evening at the computer I can find dozens of the precise photos I need, sometimes in high resolution, and often showing the obscure details and options that I am looking for. In colour too, which the magazine photos frequently lacked. Though of course I usually fall down a few rabbit holes while I'm at it.

 

LOL, those damnable rabbit holes.Wink

Yes, the computer and the Internet has helped a lot in doing research.

---------------------------------
Digital Cowboy
Live Long and Prosper
On the bench: Star Trek: Romulan Bird of Prey; 1964 Ford Fairlane

  • Member since
    May, 2013
Posted by Digital_Cowboy on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 11:24 AM

mrmike

For me, research depends upon how much I need to do for any given model.  If I have an idea and I need to find out more, then I use Google, Google Images, and books in my library.  I have several books that I can reference for information.  The internet is at my fingertips (ha-ha) with my laptop sitting next to me at the bench.  Sometimes, I throw caution to the wind and do very little to no research at all!  

 

You're a brave soul Mike.Wink

---------------------------------
Digital Cowboy
Live Long and Prosper
On the bench: Star Trek: Romulan Bird of Prey; 1964 Ford Fairlane

  • Member since
    May, 2013
Posted by Digital_Cowboy on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 11:26 AM

Treehugger Dave

This is a good thread for me because I'm a "Research Guy" - Love doing research because I get so educated and learn so much.

That to me is part of the fun of model building.

Research for me usually begins by focusing on what style of car I'm going to build. Convertible, hardtop, two door or foor door. Next is color combinations and what looks good on a particular car. I also like to focus on the interior style, trim and colors, and of coarse the engine colors and types of engines, and all the details, if the car is going to be fairly stock. I build a lot of those now. The research is a lot of fun.

I photograph all that on the computor screen and download them into this huge digital library I have for referance later, and quite a few times will print out photographs and put them with the kit and add a note to myself that tells me where the pics are in my digital library. So easy to find that way if I need other details to help me later.

 

Dave,

It sounds like you have a very good plan of attack there.

---------------------------------
Digital Cowboy
Live Long and Prosper
On the bench: Star Trek: Romulan Bird of Prey; 1964 Ford Fairlane

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