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Comment on Chrome

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  • Member since
    October, 2008
Comment on Chrome
Posted by oldcarguy on Friday, September 29, 2017 2:00 PM

Hi ;

 I have enjoyed doing something I've always done .I read and article then put the mag away . Now , in doing this to the August 2016 issue I had forgotton to read the article on Foil - Chrome .

   Now , Tim Boyd  does mention a way of doing the  front and rear windows that I Have done . Although I agree I still do those frames in separate pieces .Why ? Well , the one fact I remember from years of messing with cars and earning money from Bent ones is this .

   The frame trim pieces were different parts . You had the bottom ( installed first ) , Then each side followed by the last , The top strip . Why ? Well remember if they didn't have rubber gaskets , the strip of sealer was no where as good as what we have today .So like a shingle on a roof . they were done like this to shed the water away from underneath .

 Didn't always work , But that was the idea . Now also in this old but applicable today article he mentions clean side and vent frames . A great area for orange peeling , Right ? I very carefully take the car body .Holding it in a cotton gloved hand to protect the finish . I begin at the base of the " C " pillar .I take the X-Acto blade with a notch in it and gently scrape all the paint off the drip rail and the frames .

 The drip rail is easier if you take a number eleven blade ( new and sharp ) and gently run it between the base of the rail and the roof . When you scrape , you then get a nice tight line . Foiling  is not that difficult and doing it this way takes longer . I have NEVER entered cars in contests since the seventies .But I still have the first in place ribbons and plaques and trophies .

 The reason I stopped competing , I can Blame on British Petroleum / Shell . It's hard to enter a model when you're three thousand miles away from the venue . I still enjoy helping folks with their models though . Also something to bear in mind . Early Pick - Up trucks that had chrome window strips - It was a flexiple plastic chromed strip tapped into the rubber gasket ! So they get a very fine line , right in the center of the rubber ! Model On !!! OldCarGuy

gjgeracci
  • Member since
    September, 2017
Posted by Big Gary on Friday, September 29, 2017 7:29 PM

The use of Bare Metal foil for chrome is a subject I will be revisiting.  I have 2 projects in the words with Chrome trim and I'll be using some 10 year old BMF that's been in the fridge all that time. I hope it's still good.

  • Member since
    October, 2008
Posted by oldcarguy on Saturday, September 30, 2017 4:04 PM

Gary ;

 I would recommend taking it out of the fridge ! .I keep mine in a large book ( It's a heavy one too ! ) and in the dark of my closet , never have had problems . I never have put it in the fridge . I know you can do this with paint and C.A. I don't know about foil chrome .  O.C.G. 

gjgeracci
  • Member since
    July, 2008
  • From: Redding, CT
Posted by DanR67 on Saturday, September 30, 2017 6:35 PM

I just found Molotow Chrome Pens at Hobby Lobby and had only recenty read about them in another modeling magazine. They supposedly are the real deal and will provide a nice chrome finish. They might be worth checking out as an alternative to BMF, or just to touch up errors in the kit parts or foil.

http://s6.photobucket.com/albums/y235/Danr67/Models/

  • Member since
    October, 2015
Posted by Tim Boyd on Sunday, October 01, 2017 7:27 PM

oldcarguy

Hi ;

 I have enjoyed doing something I've always done .I read and article then put the mag away . Now , in doing this to the August 2016 issue I had forgotton to read the article on Foil - Chrome .

   Now , Tim Boyd  does mention a way of doing the  front and rear windows that I Have done . Although I agree I still do those frames in separate pieces .Why ? Well , the one fact I remember from years of messing with cars and earning money from Bent ones is this .

   The frame trim pieces were different parts . You had the bottom ( installed first ) , Then each side followed by the last , The top strip . Why ? Well remember if they didn't have rubber gaskets , the strip of sealer was no where as good as what we have today .So like a shingle on a roof . they were done like this to shed the water away from underneath .

 Didn't always work , But that was the idea . Now also in this old but applicable today article he mentions clean side and vent frames . A great area for orange peeling , Right ? I very carefully take the car body .Holding it in a cotton gloved hand to protect the finish . I begin at the base of the " C " pillar .I take the X-Acto blade with a notch in it and gently scrape all the paint off the drip rail and the frames .

 The drip rail is easier if you take a number eleven blade ( new and sharp ) and gently run it between the base of the rail and the roof . When you scrape , you then get a nice tight line . Foiling  is not that difficult and doing it this way takes longer . I have NEVER entered cars in contests since the seventies .But I still have the first in place ribbons and plaques and trophies .

 The reason I stopped competing , I can Blame on British Petroleum / Shell . It's hard to enter a model when you're three thousand miles away from the venue . I still enjoy helping folks with their models though . Also something to bear in mind . Early Pick - Up trucks that had chrome window strips - It was a flexiple plastic chromed strip tapped into the rubber gasket ! So they get a very fine line , right in the center of the rubber ! Model On !!! OldCarGuy

 

Hey Old Car.....this is Tim. 

In the article you referenced above, I did not mean to imply that the procedure I suggested was the only way to foil window trim, just that I (and others who use the approach I showed) generally find it to be quicker and easier than doing each individual molding (left, top, right, bottom) separately.  Of course, your approach also ends up using less foil.  

What I was trying to do was get people who had shied away from doing any chrome foiling at all to give BareMetal a try.  I wanted to show it is not as difficult as many people seem to think it is.  

From what I understand from the SA team (as well as the amount of personal email I recieved on this article) kit was one of the best recieved articles I've penned in a long time.  Either that, or those who didn't like it kept it to themselves (smile).  

Also, I've been using the new Molotow pens for almost a year now and my experience has generally been very favorable.  Plus they're much easier for wheel lip moldings, which can be a real pain with BareMetal.  But for now, I'm keeping to BareMetal for side moldings, roof rails and windshield frames, rocker moldings.  

Anyway, appreciated the comments and happy to see any methods and approaches to adding simulated chrome trim to model cars - it sure makes a difference in the appearance of the completed project. 

TIM BOYD 

  • Member since
    February, 2016
Posted by Plowboy on Monday, October 02, 2017 7:13 AM

Good foil work begins the minute you take the body out of the box. I start by sanding the inside edges where the inside and outside molds separate with 600 grit. I then scribe around the windshield and back light trim. This gives the trim a separated look and makes the foil easier to trim. After primer,I sand all the trim with 1000 grit. Once painted, I sand and polish the trim with the rest of the body. After the foil is applied, I polish it with a cotton cloth. The only thing I foil in one piece is the vent windows if they have them. The rest are separated as they are on the full scale version.

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