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Acrylic paint problem

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  • Member since
    July, 2011
Acrylic paint problem
Posted by shifter66 on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 3:30 PM

I'm having a problem with acrylic paint. After painting a model with acrylic (Tamiya) and waiting several days then clearing with acrylic and again waiting several days, I've had a problem with leaving fingerprints in the paint and almost ruining a nice paint job as I continue to work on the model. I do not have the problem with lacquer paints. Am I not waiting long enough for paint to dry and how long should you wait. I have tried wearing cotton and latex gloves but still have the problem. I am using an airbrush but I don't think that affects the problem. Thanks all

  • Member since
    November, 2004
  • From: UK
Posted by PatrickW on Wednesday, September 13, 2017 2:14 AM

I'm no specialist with airbrushes as I only use rattle cans, but is sounds like the paint is either not thinned enough or is painted to thickly (too many coats at once), or even the environment is not warm enough.

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Wednesday, September 13, 2017 9:40 AM

Most people paint intermittinly or as the need arises, so never really get acquainted with a particular brand of paint or type of paint and their characteristics,  or do test samples or experiment with the paint they're about to use which almost always creates "HAVOC" with the person painting.

You can't just pick up a model and "Blow Paint" and expect perfection especially if you rarely paint like most of us.

I do a refresher coarse before every paint job and I've been painting for decades.

There are way too many variables for any of us to think we can pick up an air brush or rattle can and effortlessly create perfection, unless you paint every day.

Getting a great paint job, especially one that wins awards is a huge accomplishment.

It takes very special skills and gifted talent, and the truth is not everyone can do it to the level they seek. That's why people leave here. This hobby isn't for everyone. It's not as easy as it looks.

Truth be told. Most people don't want to invest the time and money to gain the skills necessary to achieve the perfection they want.

Our society today wants everything instantly and absolutely perfect without even a thought that it may take some earned talent and time.

I love Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions and what would I do without Ebay.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    November, 2016
Posted by bluenote75 on Wednesday, September 13, 2017 11:10 AM

Treehugger Dave

Most people paint intermittinly or as the need arises, so never really get acquainted with a particular brand of paint or type of paint and their characteristics,  or do test samples or experiment with the paint they're about to use which almost always creates "HAVOC" with the person painting.

You can't just pick up a model and "Blow Paint" and expect perfection especially if you rarely paint like most of us.

I do a refresher coarse before every paint job and I've been painting for decades.

There are way too many variables for any of us to think we can pick up an air brush or rattle can and effortlessly create perfection, unless you paint every day.

Getting a great paint job, especially one that wins awards is a huge accomplishment.

It takes very special skills and gifted talent, and the truth is not everyone can do it to the level they seek. That's why people leave here. This hobby isn't for everyone. It's not as easy as it looks.

Truth be told. Most people don't want to invest the time and money to gain the skills necessary to achieve the perfection they want.

Our society today wants everything instantly and absolutely perfect without even a thought that it may take some earned talent and time.

 

 
The OP didn't say anything about being able to lay down a good paint job.  The OP's question was why the paint is still tacky/leaving fingerprints days after painting.
 
To the OP, I'm not sure why it would still be leaving fingerprints after several days.  I wonder if perhaps using a lacquer clear coat would dry harder and thus prevent fingerprints?
  • Member since
    July, 2011
Posted by shifter66 on Wednesday, September 13, 2017 12:46 PM

bluenote75

 I understand that I'm not a professional and don't paint everyday but I do like to model and want to do the best I can so any and all answers will be appreciated. I like the idea of maybe trying a lacquer clear coat. Thanks to all

 
Treehugger Dave

Most people paint intermittinly or as the need arises, so never really get acquainted with a particular brand of paint or type of paint and their characteristics,  or do test samples or experiment with the paint they're about to use which almost always creates "HAVOC" with the person painting.

You can't just pick up a model and "Blow Paint" and expect perfection especially if you rarely paint like most of us.

I do a refresher coarse before every paint job and I've been painting for decades.

There are way too many variables for any of us to think we can pick up an air brush or rattle can and effortlessly create perfection, unless you paint every day.

Getting a great paint job, especially one that wins awards is a huge accomplishment.

It takes very special skills and gifted talent, and the truth is not everyone can do it to the level they seek. That's why people leave here. This hobby isn't for everyone. It's not as easy as it looks.

Truth be told. Most people don't want to invest the time and money to gain the skills necessary to achieve the perfection they want.

Our society today wants everything instantly and absolutely perfect without even a thought that it may take some earned talent and time.

 

 

 
The OP didn't say anything about being able to lay down a good paint job.  The OP's question was why the paint is still tacky/leaving fingerprints days after painting.
 
To the OP, I'm not sure why it would still be leaving fingerprints after several days.  I wonder if perhaps using a lacquer clear coat would dry harder and thus prevent fingerprints?
 

bluenote75

 

 
Treehugger Dave

Most people paint intermittinly or as the need arises, so never really get acquainted with a particular brand of paint or type of paint and their characteristics,  or do test samples or experiment with the paint they're about to use which almost always creates "HAVOC" with the person painting.

You can't just pick up a model and "Blow Paint" and expect perfection especially if you rarely paint like most of us.

I do a refresher coarse before every paint job and I've been painting for decades.

There are way too many variables for any of us to think we can pick up an air brush or rattle can and effortlessly create perfection, unless you paint every day.

Getting a great paint job, especially one that wins awards is a huge accomplishment.

It takes very special skills and gifted talent, and the truth is not everyone can do it to the level they seek. That's why people leave here. This hobby isn't for everyone. It's not as easy as it looks.

Truth be told. Most people don't want to invest the time and money to gain the skills necessary to achieve the perfection they want.

Our society today wants everything instantly and absolutely perfect without even a thought that it may take some earned talent and time.

 

 

 
The OP didn't say anything about being able to lay down a good paint job.  The OP's question was why the paint is still tacky/leaving fingerprints days after painting.
 
To the OP, I'm not sure why it would still be leaving fingerprints after several days.  I wonder if perhaps using a lacquer clear coat would dry harder and thus prevent fingerprints?
 

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Atlanta GA
Posted by Zoom Zoom on Thursday, September 14, 2017 9:16 AM

I have not used Tamiya gloss acrylics for airbrushing bodies ever since my first experience w/them ended up in a dry lake bed disaster of cracking. That was 30-ish years ago. 

I have paid attention to those talented builders who have used it in more recent years and they claim it takes absolutely forever for it to cure. That's likely your issue. Using a food dehydrator might help. Or use lacquers instead. Tamiya flat acrylics work fine, I airbrush them w/o issue and they dry rapidly. You can use Tamiya lacquer thinner w/the acrylics (and regular lacquer thinner works sometimes too), that will also help them dry faster. It was developed to make their acrylics airbrush more like traditional solvent-based paints. 

Buy a box of white plastic spoons at the grocery store, test your paints on those when you are learning a new paint or experimenting, or just rusty.

Zoom Zoom, aka Bob Downie My Fotki Album The only cure for modeler's ADD is "final assembly and decal placement"

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