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3D Printing For Parts

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  • Member since
    October, 2016
3D Printing For Parts
Posted by CanesBart on Friday, February 17, 2017 5:08 PM

A freind just sent me a 1/56 1951 Ford Truck, and a 1969 Charger he made on his 3D printer.  For miniature wargaming in 28mm (1/56 scale).

He made 30's and 40's cars, like Mercs and  such, for his "Pulp" wargaming that are frankly fantastic.  

They are solid, but look spot on, even the grille, windshield, trim detail and such.  Amazingly good looking.  Haven't recieved 'em yet, just saw the pics he sent me.

He has already printed out very detailed 1/56 figures, including a Dirty Harry, Ash from "Evil Dead" and a Shaun from "Shaun of the Dead", so I know you can get fine detail.  

Has anyone 3D printed a part for a 1/25 model?  

Mein gott!  If you can print out say, a grill, hood or wheel this way, it HAS to be more efficient han sculpting a prototype then casting in resin?

I am amazed by the quality.  Never paid much attention to it before, figured it was like a vacuform, limited to basic, simple shapes without too much concave curves or detail.  

 

He says the trick is in the digital design.

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Saturday, February 18, 2017 12:48 PM

A few months ago we got a 3D printer in our office at work. We have been working with it a bit trying to tweak it and figure it out. We have been printing off models of submarines and are starting to have some success. Once the models are printed of I take them home and assemble & paint them, and they are looking pretty cool. I have an LA class bomber on the bench right now. So far our print files are ones that we have found on line, but a draftsperson in the office is drawing up files for printing a detailed model of the Canadian navy subs. It's taking some sorting out as we try to work around the limitations of the machine, but we are making progress. 3D printing is something that will be a large part of the future of plastic modelling.

Power matters in the straights.
Lightness matters everywhere. - Colin Chapman

Trevor

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Saturday, February 18, 2017 1:50 PM

While I'm not against 3D printers, and do think they will make a very nice new "TOOL" in our arsenal of "TOYZZ", I myself see several things possibly being lost in the hobby.

Before CNC machining came along, Tool making, custom machining and pattern making were more of an "ART-FORM than a "Science, as it took skills not required in CNC work.

There was more pride in your work, as there were different levels of skills needed to qualify for a position, and be qualified to produce items from a blue print.

Now people just program a machine and walk away and the machine makes as many as you want.

I have already seen people making entire cars and kits on a 3D machine, and while this is great for all of us who want something that isn't mass-produced, and don't have the skills to scratch-build a non-existant model, I can see contest and rules changing quite a bit when everything that is really good was created by a machine, and all that's left to judge is finish, paint, detail and assembly. Maybe there'll be a separate class.

For me what would be lost as a scratch-builder is the pride of using the disciplines I have acquired over the years to create a part, or create a body by hand and the sense of accomplishment I get from a hand crafted part or entire finished model

Eventually I will probably buy one, but limit the usage to "Novelty", as staying a craftsman and using my skills that took years to develope, allows me to keep enjoying the hobby for the reasons I was first attracted to it.

Old School and New School meet somewhere in the middle CoolThumbs Up.

I love Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions and what would I do without Ebay.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    October, 2016
Posted by CanesBart on Monday, February 20, 2017 4:38 PM

Treehugger Dave

While I'm not against 3D printers, and do think they will make a very nice new "TOOL" in our arsenal of "TOYZZ", I myself see several things possibly being lost in the hobby.

Before CNC machining came along, Tool making, custom machining and pattern making were more of an "ART-FORM than a "Science, as it took skills not required in CNC work.

There was more pride in your work, as there were different levels of skills needed to qualify for a position, and be qualified to produce items from a blue print.

Now people just program a machine and walk away and the machine makes as many as you want.

I have already seen people making entire cars and kits on a 3D machine, and while this is great for all of us who want something that isn't mass-produced, and don't have the skills to scratch-build a non-existant model, I can see contest and rules changing quite a bit when everything that is really good was created by a machine, and all that's left to judge is finish, paint, detail and assembly. Maybe there'll be a separate class.

For me what would be lost as a scratch-builder is the pride of using the disciplines I have acquired over the years to create a part, or create a body by hand and the sense of accomplishment I get from a hand crafted part or entire finished model

Eventually I will probably buy one, but limit the usage to "Novelty", as staying a craftsman and using my skills that took years to develope, allows me to keep enjoying the hobby for the reasons I was first attracted to it.

Old School and New School meet somewhere in the middle CoolThumbs Up.

 

 

Totally see your point.   I scratchbuilt a stock '72 Duster grille, carved/sculpted myself in sculpey and then casted in resin.  Then I bought 3 of said from Vaughn.  His were better ONLY because his little parking lights had detailed lens and mine featured a sunken in base for Furure floor ploish lens, but anyway...

 

I am AMAZED at the detail of the grille on the 1/56 cars he made me.  Simply astounding.   And the wheel and tire detail.

This will be a thing!  No "cheating" to 3D print out the correct, unavailable hubcaps for a Al Bundy stock Duster, or a Bluesmobile, you still have to paint them and modify them to fit your model!

A '67 Lemans Hood for all the '67 GTO kits?  Boom!  Now you can make the Night of the Living Dead Lemans!

 

A '72 Duster Trunk?  Boom!  No you dont have to pay 200 bucks for a MPC body of a '72 Duster on Ebay from that guy who stock splits kits and charges 8 bucks shipping per part!

Treehugger, if you want to keep me in your camp, I have a list of basic parts I need scratchbuilt so I can convert kits into my TV/Movie cars!

 

 I'm pretty good, but not an artist when it comes to sculpting from scratch.  Im not good at molding and casting, I once carved a PERFECT '51 Ford F-1 Grille for my Sanford and Son Truck years ago.  Couldnt get the rubber mold right  :(  And THATS why Ken Kitchen is the "Sanford and Son Truck God" and not me  :)

 

So PM me, and together we will put the "art" back in ...uh...scratchbuilding! Big Smile

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