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MASKING GLASS

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  • Member since
    May, 2008
MASKING GLASS
Posted by ambman on Sunday, January 29, 2017 4:38 PM

THE BEST WAY TO MASK WINDSHILEDS TAILLIGHTS ETC ETC IS WITH MOLD BUILDER NO MATTER HOW LONG YOU LEAVE IT ON IT WONT RUIN THE PLASTIC AFTER APPLYING IT I STILL USE TAPE BUT YOU DONT HAVE TO GO CRAZY MASKING EVERY INCH TRY IT WITH SCARP PARTS FIRST..

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  • Member since
    November, 2003
Posted by jhaught on Monday, January 30, 2017 8:42 AM

The best way to have people read your posts is to use spellcheck, punctuation, and turn off caps lock ...

Jim Haught

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by ambman on Monday, January 30, 2017 10:52 AM

MY wife tells me the same thing.Its probably because i have numerous projects sitting on my desk and i do this in a hurry.Plus i try to get down stairs right away  b4 she tells me to take out the garbage.P.S. i sent some pictures of my build and i wonder if your photos are updated frequently .I  have not seen it.It was a 70 nypd cruiser..

  • Member since
    February, 2016
Posted by Plowboy on Monday, January 30, 2017 4:48 PM

Actually, the best way is to do all of your painting before you install the glass,tail lights etc. etc.

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by ambman on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 8:33 PM

That is true with some kits ...thanxxxxxxxx But the mold builder really works good ,also for aircraft.

  • Member since
    September, 2011
Posted by Arthur Anderson on Saturday, February 04, 2017 6:08 AM

Back to the basics here:  Real cars get painted, at the factory, BEFORE any glass, or lights are installed--which if you think about it, makes perfect sense!  And in the bargain, virtually every model car builder I've known (including myself) does it in exactly the very same way.

The same is true of any competent, conscientious body shop--particularly if the paint job is major, as in all over.

The problem with having these things installed on a model before painting is that this requires a ton of tedious, delicate masking   along with the very real risk of paint creeping through a wrinkle in the tape, not to mention the possibility of pulling the masked part(s) off the project when removing the tape.

Art

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by ambman on Saturday, February 04, 2017 6:12 PM

Maybe you are right ,but i have some diecasts that i want to paint ,and with past experience i have taken them apart and could not put them back together.So this is the only way.So this should  make a very interesting paint job .Its a 1/25 metro from firrst gear,not cheap.But if it works out it will be really nice 1960s nyc ambulance.With home grown bubble gum light.

  • Member since
    September, 2011
Posted by Arthur Anderson on Saturday, February 11, 2017 12:56 AM

ambman

Maybe you are right ,but i have some diecasts that i want to paint ,and with past experience i have taken them apart and could not put them back together.So this is the only way.So this should  make a very interesting paint job .Its a 1/25 metro from firrst gear,not cheap.But if it works out it will be really nice 1960s nyc ambulance.With home grown bubble gum light.

 

ambman

Maybe you are right ,but i have some diecasts that i want to paint ,and with past experience i have taken them apart and could not put them back together.So this is the only way.So this should  make a very interesting paint job .Its a 1/25 metro from firrst gear,not cheap.But if it works out it will be really nice 1960s nyc ambulance.With home grown bubble gum light.

 

I understand, however I think my advice still stands.  Having worked in product development for a producer of diecast miniature cars and trucks,  I know that there are many different ways those get assembled at the factory. I have the Metro model you mention, and its assembly is different from any 1/24 scale diecasts I've seen.

For starters, the glass appears to be glued in place, which ordinarily would be intimidating, however that assembly stage was done after the body shell was painted--even though the paint is probably a baked-on enamel, I suspect that the glass can be CAREFULLY pressed out of the body shell.  In order to do this, the model would need to be disassembled, and that will take some very careful study beforehand, as I can see no screw heads exposed underneath (I didn't take the time to thoroughly study my example but there have to be at least 2 (possibly4) self-tap screws holding the chassis in place.

Generally speaking, once the chassis is removed, most all the interior parts should come out easily--in the mass-production of pieces such as this, most often interior parts are trapped into place by the chassis being firmly held into the body.

If you can figure out how to remove the chassis and interior panels/details from the diecast body, you should be able to use masking tape to protect the inside surfaces of the glass from paint overspray (that would be "key" to a clean job of painting) and simply mask off the glass with good quality masking tape on the exterior of the windshield panes as well as the side and rear doors.  

Were I to repaint one of these, ideally the thing to do would be to figure out now to remove the "glass" parts completely, then strip the paint off the body and doors (mine has a fair amout of faint "orange peel" in the paint surface), in order to get down to the bare metal.  For this step--"Aircraft Grade" paint stripper is the ONLY stripper I'd use, as it's for use on "non-ferrous" metal--common paint strippers are meant for wood or steel, and will severely "etch" other metals such as Zamak, which is what your model is cast from!), then start afresh with an adhesion-promoting automotive primer, followed by the finish colors.  But, you might ask "why remove the glass"?  The simple, but straight-forward answer is, any paint strippers you would use sucessfully on baked enamel will destroy polystyene (which I can assure you those panes of window glass are molded in!), so removing them before stripping the paint is essential!

Once painted and polished, the glass can be reinstalled using a good clear epoxy or even the clear glue used for watch crystals.

I know this sounds like a ton of work, and in a way it is--but to do a really decent repaint, and ensure good, clear, clean "glass", that's the way I would do it (and I have disassembled and repainted several larger scale diecasts in the past)

Art Anderson

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by ambman on Saturday, February 11, 2017 6:34 PM

Thank you, it is complicated ,but a few years ago i sucssefuly did a nypd PATTY WAGON with masking tape and did not take it apart ,it came out nice. It is now in a collection owned by a officer,and he says its his favorite.I am heading to the ny toy fair soon ,cant wait to see what diecast are coming out,,,

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by ambman on Saturday, February 25, 2017 7:36 PM

I just took off masking tape ,and i am still looking at this thing and cant find any paint spots.The mold builder was on for 2 and a half weeks and no stains.Thank you for your response .The windows are hard to remove but i just carefully painted around them .Now for the fun part ,homemade decals,old nyc ambulance municipal hospital system .The computer is a wonderful thing,Can you imagine tring to find them on aweb site.And forget about expensive ebay

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Sunday, February 26, 2017 1:23 AM

There are circumstances where masking the glass is a necessity.

I have an AMT 1962 Mercury convertible annual that I will need to mask the glass on before painting.

It is a built up that will be restored at some point & the previous builder glued the glass so heavily that removing it has proven to be an impossibility without destroying the windshield frame.

The glass looks good as far as no glue mess that will be exposed when the resto is finished, but I have tried every trick in the book to remove it with no luck.

It won't be a major masking job as the frame will be foiled anyway, but it will still need to be masked before paint.

 

Steve

  • Member since
    July, 2008
Posted by Foxer on Sunday, February 26, 2017 7:07 AM

Could you post a link or at least give the product name for what you are advocating? I don't know what "mold builder" is.

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by ambman on Thursday, March 09, 2017 3:55 PM

On ebay its listed under mold maker

  • Member since
    October, 2016
Posted by CanesBart on Thursday, March 09, 2017 8:07 PM

Paint on latex rubber mask is great as well.

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