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computer made parts?

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  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: CA Gold Country foothills.
computer made parts?
Posted by mishalah on Tuesday, August 11, 2015 1:31 AM

Does anyone out there have the ability to make computer generated parts from pictures or drawings?

"Help me....I've fallen and I can't get up."...my models are crushing me. my pics: https://public.fotki.com/dallas916/

  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Cape Coral Florida
Posted by BigTallDad on Tuesday, August 11, 2015 7:47 AM

mishalah

Does anyone out there have the ability to make computer generated parts from pictures or drawings?

 

I'm guessing, but I think you're talking about parts made on a 3-D printer. Right?

"In order to teach a dog, you must first be smarter than the dog" P.R. Ferguson

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Midwest
Posted by High octane on Tuesday, August 11, 2015 9:02 AM

Computer generated model parts, hmmm. I know that I'm "old fashioned" and very "old school" but I've been building model kits since the mid-50's and never had the need for these parts. I also feel that I'll be able to build in the future without computer generated parts as well. I know it's the supposedly "in thing" but I really don't care.

High octane

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Tuesday, August 11, 2015 10:03 AM

I hear ya High Octane. Not much even into the metal stuff. Brass bodies and so on.

Even though I'm a bit of a scratch-builder and parts basher,  this 3-D generated stuff has my curiosity peaked.

Computor generated parts still need the skills of hand finishing, modifying, priming and painting, and detailing. In some cases I could see the use of BMF, or one of the spray chromes on the market, and those all take developed talants from years of building and learning new techniques.

I see this new technology as a new tool in our arsenal of"Weapons" to have fun with, and to create pieces in a totally new way.

Down the road a bit I may have to invest in one of these new toys to see what fun I could have - Maybe get some "Bragging" rights too Smile, Wink & GrinSmile, Wink & Grin

 

 

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    January, 2010
Posted by dreamsinplastic on Tuesday, August 11, 2015 10:16 AM

Hey Mishalah.....Try TDR innovations for an example of 3D printed parts.They are made by "Shape-Ways". They ARE quite pricey!!

I'm sure I read somewhere on their web site,they can reproduce your renderings of what you want (Again,if you have the $'s).

I purchased some 1/12 parts for my SBC '57 chevy project.

4Bbl. carb,In/tk manifold,Dist. cap & base,water outlet(thermostat) housing.......I was IMPRESSED with the scale,detail and quality......Just saying......Doesn't cost anything to LQQK!!

I'm in the middle of a BIG move....From Corpus Christi TX to Tucson AZ.

NO building for awhile,til I set up my shop again !!

                   

 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    June, 2015
Posted by massmodeler on Tuesday, August 11, 2015 8:09 PM

No thanks on computer generated parts. That's not creative and it is not using your own hands and brains.

  • Member since
    July, 2007
Posted by FloridaBoy on Saturday, August 22, 2015 3:42 PM

At our last model car show held in Deerfield Beach, Fla, a couple of aftermarket vendors offered on their tables psrts made from a 3D printer.  As an old school modeler, I was impressed and already daydreamed of the possibilities in the future of this approach.

Just wait until the machines come cheaper!!!!!!

Ken Willaman
  • Member since
    March, 2010
Posted by 70CudaTJ on Sunday, August 23, 2015 9:19 AM

 

I can see both sides of the story here and as FloridaBoy said, the future possibilities are endless. The finish of parts will get better with technology advances. I can see them being used for parts that would be too delicate to make by hand or complex shapes that can't be copied easily by hand.

I do believe in making my own bits, been doing it for years, but think how much better detailed our models would be with this new level of detail? 3D modeling wont suit everyone though, but for a detail addict like me I can see a benefit in them and I will explore getting one for myself as they evolve and get cheaper. My 2 Cents


  • Member since
    August, 2008
  • From: kingsport,tn.
Posted by 01jeepxj on Sunday, August 23, 2015 5:14 PM

What TJ said. I can see some REALLY detailed engines! Other parts might include shifters with great detail, tools for the trunk etc. They might need "flash" cleanup like parts do now, but I can see some benefits.

And I'm REALLY old (fashioned)! My 2 Cents

Never try to teach a pig to sing. It's a waste of time and it only annoys the pig.

  • Member since
    March, 2010
Posted by 70CudaTJ on Monday, August 24, 2015 1:29 AM

G'day 01jeepxj, good to see you here, hope all is well with you?

  • Member since
    August, 2009
Posted by Spex84 on Monday, August 24, 2015 5:23 PM

I have made some parts suitable for video games. Making parts ("meshes") for 3D printing is a little tougher, because they have to be perfectly closed solids (no "false fronts" or paper-thin walls) and wall thickness and layout needs to be planned in order to maximize strength, detail and efficiency of printing...while minimizing cost. 

The idea that making CAD models is "uncreative" or uses "no brain power" is...not accurate. It's a process of creative problem-solving just like any other. Computer models don't magically build themselves...they take many hours of hard work to create.

If it's "cheating" to using 3D-printed parts (instead of scratchbuilding), then I suppose taking advantage of the entire resin aftermarket is "cheating" too.

So there's the issue: finding someone with the skills, but also the time and inclination to make parts suitable for printing. There are a variety of small aftermarket businesses springing up, offering wheels, engines, etc.

Paying someone to make specific custom 3D models and prep them for printing could get costly, quickly, especially considering how picky modelers can be about detail and accuracy.

That leaves learning the software yourself--I'd suggest Blender for modeling (it's free) and there are also some free programs that will allow you to create 3D-printable solid meshes with wall thickness, support structures, etc, as well as calculate the internal volume so you can estimate cost. Companies like Shapeways can print the parts and ship them to you.

 

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Monday, August 24, 2015 8:37 PM

Spex84

I have made some parts suitable for video games. Making parts ("meshes") for 3D printing is a little tougher, because they have to be perfectly closed solids (no "false fronts" or paper-thin walls) and wall thickness and layout needs to be planned in order to maximize strength, detail and efficiency of printing...while minimizing cost. 

The idea that making CAD models is "uncreative" or uses "no brain power" is...not accurate. It's a process of creative problem-solving just like any other. Computer models don't magically build themselves...they take many hours of hard work to create.

If it's "cheating" to using 3D-printed parts (instead of scratchbuilding), then I suppose taking advantage of the entire resin aftermarket is "cheating" too.

So there's the issue: finding someone with the skills, but also the time and inclination to make parts suitable for printing. There are a variety of small aftermarket businesses springing up, offering wheels, engines, etc.

Paying someone to make specific custom 3D models and prep them for printing could get costly, quickly, especially considering how picky modelers can be about detail and accuracy.

That leaves learning the software yourself--I'd suggest Blender for modeling (it's free) and there are also some free programs that will allow you to create 3D-printable solid meshes with wall thickness, support structures, etc, as well as calculate the internal volume so you can estimate cost. Companies like Shapeways can print the parts and ship them to you.

 

 

Spex

I like your take on all this Thumbs Up.

Any aspect of this hobby over the last 60 years has always been about skill and creatitivity and for some reason over the years there are always those few who "rise up" and for some reason, declare themselves the "Gurues" and "Definers of this hobby", deciding in their own wisdom what is acceptable and what isn't, and expect everyone to bow down and follow their magnanamous lead, because of "Who they think thet are to this hobby". This kind of thinking mearly stiffles people creativity and the hobby. The old out-dated dinasaurs of the hobby need to step aside for younger modelers with fresh new idea's about how this hobby should move forward.

To me, in my way of thinking, it's time to retire some of these antiquated restrictions on the people and their creativity idea's, and allow the creative new technology to be accepted, yes even embraced, as a very progressive "new creativity", that will sharpen the skills, and raise the bar of new challanges.

No part of this hobby has ever been easy for any of us, if we have continually pushed ourselves to new levels of skills. This new technology will challange us, and as usual, some will do better than others.

Over the years, since the invention of social media, I have seen well adjusted people turned into the majority of folks not having much or any self-worth, always worrying about what others think of them, and worrying about being accepted if they don't adhere to "the Political correctness MENTALITI" - Basically - NO BA##s.

How can a person have freedom to be themselves and be creative in their own way, when they have given up their individualism??? My 2 CentsMy 2 CentsMy 2 Cents - My 2 cents X3 Smile, Wink & Grin

SoapBox LaughLaugh

 

 

 

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    February, 2010
  • From: Surrey BC
Posted by Stanger on Saturday, August 29, 2015 1:19 AM

I just got a 3D printer a few weeks ago ( prices have come down introductory price $375 plus free shipping, can't beat that ). Still learning to use it but have printed some parts successfully - non automotive so far. This is just another tool to build the models and parts that I can't get any other way. 

Part of what I want to do is to scan, using a digital DSLR to take lots of pictures ( around 100 ) of a model in a smaller scale that I can't get in 1/25, load them into the photogrammetry program and then print it any size I want. It will still need a lot of work to make it a usable model body. I have made my own resin bodies and parts and built resin that I have bought ( working on a Jimmy Flintstone resin Hudson Hornet " Ranchero"  type pickup). I see no difference in using a printed body or part to add another model to my collection than building a model from plastic, resin or die cast. All that matters is the results.

I just downloaded a file to print a mitre chopping tool. So you can make your own tools to help you in your building. 

Gerry

  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: CA Gold Country foothills.
Posted by mishalah on Tuesday, February 12, 2019 4:51 PM

Hi Gerry;

 

First, I want to thank everyone for their input and information.  I did mean 3-D printer.  I have spent about 60 years trying all kinds of materials and manipulations for making parts for my models.  My early attempts....some are good, some were poor.  But as I got better and my models became show pieces and winners, I got more picky about what could be used or made to fit on the cars.  Now, I'm at the point where accuracy and clean lines are imperitive.  So, even if it takes a pro I'll go the way that gets me a part that works right. 

 

My challenge right now is the engine on my 1/8 scale Entex Porsche 934 Turbo Carrera.  I made a correct manifold and fan piece, and have parts for the fan drive and most everything else, but that alternator/fan shaft bracket is killin' me.  It's an irregular shape with different-sized spokes inside and a clamp bracket wrapped around to hold the alternator.  That bracket has stumped me because I don't mill parts from aluminum or plastic blocks.  I know a 3-D printer can create the part and "build" it in a very short time. 

Yeah, I looked at buying one for myself, but I'm almost 71 now and can't finish my WIPs I already have that only need simple stuff.  I'll post a pic if I can still remember how.  

Nope...completely forgot how to post pics.  :(

 

 

"Help me....I've fallen and I can't get up."...my models are crushing me. my pics: https://public.fotki.com/dallas916/

  • Member since
    January, 2019
Posted by ModelTexan1 on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 4:10 PM

I design and print my own parts now on almost every model I build.  This helps me compensate for some of the flaws in the kits (such as floating alternators) as well as improving details or kit-bashing.  For example, I have printed engines for curbside kits.  Look at my Tucker model postings (under ModelTexan or ModelTexan1) for what can be accomplished.  I think it is a great way to enhance our model skills.  Learning to "draw" your own parts can be challenging but no more so than making your own scratchbuilt parts by hand where you break down the part into shapes that are then glued together.  That technique has been used for decades and it applies very well to CAD for 3D printing; you just use a video screen instead of bits of plastic :)

 

  • Member since
    March, 2012
Posted by Night stone on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 8:39 PM

 

mishalah

Does anyone out there have the ability to make computer generated parts from pictures or drawings?

 

I had planned to get a 3d printed, but did my research and found out it takes a lot of work to make your own designs. So I just bought some items, there are pros and cons to the items. Here is a pics of some items I got

http://public.fotki.com/NightStone/

https://www.pinterest.com/night0001/

  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Canberra, Australia
Posted by aussiemuscle308 on Thursday, February 14, 2019 1:57 AM
wow mishalah, you found your original post from 2015.

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