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Help with Tacky Glue

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  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Delaware
Help with Tacky Glue
Posted by AndrewMcD on Friday, November 8, 2019 8:42 AM

I've read that Tacky Glue is useful for prefitting pieces of a model prior to painting.  Can somebody explain a little about how to go about this?  For example I want to assemble the roll cage and other interior components on a Corvette model to ensure everything fits properly before painting and final assembly.  If Tacky Glue is used is it easy to break the joints and clean them prior to painting and reassembly.  Is there a particular solvent that allows easy disassembly and cleaning of parts that have been assembled for a test fit?

Thanks,

Andrew

  • Member since
    December 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Friday, November 8, 2019 10:44 AM

Tacky Glue usually refers to Aleen's Tacky Glue or Anita's Tacky Glue. These are PVA glues, a type that includes Elmer's Glue or any of those familiar white wood glues or craft glues. PVA glues are easily picked off or removed from plastic kit parts once they have dried. If necessary they can be softened or disolved with a good soak in water, and I've heard that vinager is even better though haven't tried it myself.

PVA glues work well for mocking up sub-assemblies. I do a lot of mocking up when building, often building whole chassis, engine, or interior assemblies in an effort to pre-determine any fit issues, or to facilitate the construction or modification of other assemblies. I use Elmer's Glue just because it's what I have on hand. I have used Aleen's Tacky glue and liked it better as it was tackier and tacked up faster than Elmer's.

I like the PVA glues for mocking up because it removes easily and cleanly from the parts once it has set up, or washes off with water before it has set up. The downside to PVA glues is they set up slowly, though I seldom find this to be a problem. I just move on to something else while it sets. It is also not very strong, but I use great gobs of the stuff where needed. No need for it to be pretty, just effective.

There are other methods for mocking up. Some guys use masking tape, though in most cases it hasn't worked well for me. Microscale makes Micro Liquitape for this purpose. It is a tacky and seemingly PVA glue, though it doesn't seem to remove as cleanly as other PVAs (though I do use it as an adhesive in certain situations). I also have a sticky mocking up paste in a little red container (forget the name) which I think is popular in the model train and doll house hobbies, but despite the claim in the lid, it doesn't clean off at all. There are others who use hot glue gun for mock ups. That might work very well, but I have yet to try it.

Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
       - Antoine de Saint-Exepury

Trevor

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Delaware
Posted by AndrewMcD on Saturday, November 9, 2019 6:32 AM

Thanks for the informative response, it is much appreciated. Picked up some Aleen's Tacky glue today and mocked up that Corvette roll cage and other interior components.  Doing the mock up shed light on some best approaches to use during final assembly as well as highlighting a few small alignment issuses that were resolved with a bit of sanding and trimming.  Disassembly of the Tacky Glue joints was no issue.  In some respects it was beneficial to use more glue than required as it seems easier to peel off a glob than scrape off a thin layer.  Thanks again for the assistance.

Andrew

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