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Nah, they'll never sell any !!

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  • Member since
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  • From: nottingham,england
Nah, they'll never sell any !!
Posted by arcturus on Friday, December 09, 2016 11:08 AM

We see a lot of threads about 'what modelling subjects we'd like to see made'
Yes I'd like some fuselage era chryslers, some 70 Lincolns etc, BUT the response we get to those types of cars is, they'll never sell, young people aren't interested in those types of cars and apparently model companies only make cars that will appeal to the younger market and cars they make alternative kits from.

But is that just nonsense?

Lets find out.

Look at Modelhaus, they went 20+ years casting unusual subjects and succeeding at it. They were simple, curbside kits and not cheap or even that easy to build sometimes either- They certainly were for the experinced builder, so I'm not even taking into consideration the younger less experienced builder here. Now if a cottage industry can sell simple expensive resins to mainly old timers  and still be popular in the sales department without all the marketing tools of a company like Revell, then why can't revell do it?  If modelhaus kits were $20 like a revell kit is, how many 76 Cadillacs or 75 Impala 4 doors would they of sold? Quite clearly the demand is there. 
Just going on Ebay and seeing how much people are paying for Promos and old models of Cadillacs and Toronados etc says that people are wanting them.

Look at a car like the 74 Impala 4 door modelhaus made or the 78 LTD 4 door AAM did. If Revell did such a thing, there could be no end of versions.

'But young people don't want old cars anymore?'
Well, revell have just released a 76 Torino, 70's Bronco, a couple of 57 Fords over the past year, and look at Moebius to. Not a modern car insight, yet obviously quite desirable enough to bother making them.
Also, old 70's and 80's cars are becoming more popular. Looking at the prices of those old 70's and 80's boats. I saw a mint condition mid 80's Olds 98 2 door sell for £12k here in the UK. 

I'm sure most of us have a fond memory of an 'average' car of the era.
I've bought a resin 76 Elcamino. I'd love about 3 versions but the fact they're expensive, and trans kits with bits you have to chrome yourself puts me off. If a regular manufacturer built one they'd sell. 


'Theres nothing you can do with a model of a 70's Lincoln or Cadillac?'
Well there is.....it may not be classic lowrider or Donk, stock car material, but we're model makers. We build anything we like, convert anything we like. Why wait for a model company to give us a few extra bits to build a different version?
I once saw a thread that said Moebius was thinking of making a Kaiser Manhatten or dragon. Someone said 'Who would build one of those?, they'll only make cars they can make a NASCAR from'
Why not have a Kaiser Manhatten and make a ficticious NASCAR version? MPC made a 79 Nova 2 door in Police package....that is ficticious.

And lastly, when we have one of these "What would we like to see cast" threads, just look at the amount of people that want odd subjects.

Diecast companies produce unusual subjects, and now theres a new craze of obscure 1:43 cars from Neo and BoS. Why is it profitable for them and not Revell?

I think large companies under estimate the desirability of old 70's-80's cars.



Because unlike some Robin hoods,I can speak with an english accent...
  • Member since
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  • From: arlington, tx.
Posted by rusty32rod on Friday, December 09, 2016 11:12 AM

   Sounds like a very valid point to me.

  • Member since
    August, 2016
Posted by mini man on Friday, December 09, 2016 12:44 PM

Well said!

Will build most anything,love American cars muscle etc.Britishvehicles are a buzz too,trucks are great - want to do a jet truck,building parts up...

Nigel.

 

U.K.

  • Member since
    February, 2016
Posted by Plowboy on Friday, December 09, 2016 1:38 PM

It's not that simple. Resin casters have very little invested in their molds. Most of that investment is their time. Mold rubber and resin aren't that expensive. They don't pay licensing fees. They don't pay for art work, packaging or shipping. They don't have the investment that a kit company has. The reason they charge so much for obscure subjects is they know they won't sell a great deal of them. If Revell did make a '74 Impala four door, would you pay $80 for it?

If you had $100,000 + to invest. Would you invest it into tooling for a '74 Impala four door? Do you really think you would sell enough to get your money back? Much less, make a profit? That's what a kit company has to look at.

The reason the companies could produce obscure subjects as promos is because they had an order from the car manufacturers. They knew they would sell X numbers. They could then convert those tools into kits. It was a sure thing. 

  • Member since
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  • From: nottingham,england
Posted by arcturus on Friday, December 09, 2016 2:27 PM

Would I invest $100K in a 74 4 door Impala? No idea, but I'd explore what I could do with one. Lowrider options, police car, factory stock, Taxi, and could later be used to cast a wagon, convertible and 2 door. They'd make great clunkers and sleepers so people would buy triple. I would of thought something like this would be more versatile than a 69 Shelby convertible for example which they produced.

 

Because unlike some Robin hoods,I can speak with an english accent...
  • Member since
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  • From: Podunkville USA
Posted by gloozalot on Friday, December 09, 2016 3:36 PM

Plowboy has the idea.  However the $100K is a little low.  Today, a 1/24-1/25 full detail quality, mulit-cavity production mold tool would run around a cool million or more for the engineering, design and machine work.  Then you can start adding labor, art work, packaging, materials, warehouse, shipping, Fees........    

To Err is human, to blame it on someone else shows management potential.  

 

 

  • Member since
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  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Friday, December 09, 2016 3:37 PM

For many years we had a large window of opportunity from the late 80's until Modelhaus closed. What an eclectic choice of subjects. There was also R&R Vacuum Craft, F&F Resin and several more. We still have Jimmy Flintstone who is still the best value if you have some pretty good kit bashing and scratch building skills.

Over the years all these companies and more have given us some cars that the kit makers will never produce.

Many of us were paying attention and spent the last 15 to 25 years buyng these and putting them away to build down the road when our choices of plastic kits no longer continued to satisfy us.

Diecast from companies like Franklin Mint and Danbury mint are very high quality subject matter that many don't come in plastic or resin, and can be modified and make very unique and beautiful shelf eye candy.

There's also the old AMT and Johan kits from the 50's and early 60's which can be somewhat spendy, but provide rare sbjects to enjoy and share.

Did I have to pay good money for these rare old pieces from many years past? YES I DID. But I paid it happily, because I have something to share that will always be interesting because they are rare, and rarely seen and there are impossible or nearly impossible to buy now.

Kit manufacturers simply don't have the time and money to create eveything we see listed as what guys would like to have, and they have to think of their bottom line in making choices.

The hobby itself seems to be in a bit of a shrinking process right now. Not sure if this will continue, or if it's just part of the hobby cycle, but the kit manufacturers are aware the hobby is shrinking and have to respond appropriately.

 

 

 

I love Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions and what would I do without Ebay.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
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  • From: nottingham,england
Posted by arcturus on Friday, December 09, 2016 4:54 PM

"The hobby itself seems to be in a bit of a shrinking process right now. Not sure if this will continue, or if it's just part of the hobby cycle, but the kit manufacturers are aware the hobby is shrinking and have to respond appropriately."

Could the fact a lot of resin companies who closed like Modelhaus and R&R who specialised in the common cars, be an oppertunity by the major players to fill the gap? Do they read forums? Do they see what resin companies were doing? Someone somewhere in Revell for example decided that kitting up a 57 Ford 2 door staionwagon was going to be a good idea and worth spending money. Who decides thats desirable or not? Who decides that a 57 Country squire wouldn't of been a more fancy choice? Who decided in Trumpeter that a 78 Montecarlo would be a desirable car to make? Personally, I think if you make a subject into a decent kit, with some options and scope for alternatives, then they'd sell. Have our tastes changed as cars have gotten older? We see a new 60's corvette kit come out we're Oh god, really??. We see a base model 57 Fairlane come out, we jump for joy. Now we've had a taste of different things through the resin companies, has it changed our taste in subject matter??

Because unlike some Robin hoods,I can speak with an english accent...
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Posted by gulftarpon on Friday, December 09, 2016 6:16 PM

While I would love it if we got a full line of new models every year, diminished expectations and age have now reached me. I would be happy with scaled up versions of the 1/43 kits and scaled down versions of the 1/18 diecasts that seem to be everywhere these days. I see all those cool offerings in scales that I have no interest in and imagine those companies making them in 1/25th. I wouldn't even quibble over the media. Plastic or metal would be okay.

  • Member since
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Posted by Goofy62 on Friday, December 09, 2016 7:27 PM

Plowboy

It's not that simple. Resin casters have very little invested in their molds. Most of that investment is their time. Mold rubber and resin aren't that expensive. They don't pay licensing fees. They don't pay for art work, packaging or shipping. They don't have the investment that a kit company has. The reason they charge so much for obscure subjects is they know they won't sell a great deal of them. If Revell did make a '74 Impala four door, would you pay $80 for it?

If you had $100,000 + to invest. Would you invest it into tooling for a '74 Impala four door? Do you really think you would sell enough to get your money back? Much less, make a profit? That's what a kit company has to look at.

The reason the companies could produce obscure subjects as promos is because they had an order from the car manufacturers. They knew they would sell X numbers. They could then convert those tools into kits. It was a sure thing. 

 

This subject keeps coming up over & over again & I keep saying the same things that you've said here, but nobodies listening.

Comparing a resin castor to a kit company is comparing apples to oranges.

There is "no" comparison.

Think of it this way.

There is a reason why Johan went from making almost entirely 4 door model kits to nothing but 2 door kits in just a few years.

The reason is because they had to compete with AMT who was doing nothing but 2 door hard tops & convertibles, & they were basically eating Johan's lunch!

As far as kit manufacturers go today, every subject created must have the potential to easily be transformed into a number of other kits.

Look what Moebius did with the '53 Hudson.

It went from a stock Hudson to a racing version, to a '52, to a convertible & then to a '54.

You have to maximize your tooling in order to stay in business.

What would you get from a '74 Chevy 4 door?

A stock version & a police car, that's about it.

 

Steve

  • Member since
    February, 2004
  • From: nottingham,england
Posted by arcturus on Friday, December 09, 2016 7:30 PM

gulftarpon

While I would love it if we got a full line of new models every year, diminished expectations and age have now reached me. I would be happy with scaled up versions of the 1/43 kits and scaled down versions of the 1/18 diecasts that seem to be everywhere these days. I see all those cool offerings in scales that I have no interest in and imagine those companies making them in 1/25th. I wouldn't even quibble over the media. Plastic or metal would be okay.

 

To be honest, I've been tempted lately to start collecting 1:43 cars. A friend of mine bought me the Neo 71 imperial 4 door. Made of resin but brilliantly detailed. At the moment, 1:43 have more to offer, just not in kit form. Although they do retail around £60+ mark.

Because unlike some Robin hoods,I can speak with an english accent...
  • Member since
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  • From: United States
Posted by pontiacowner on Tuesday, December 13, 2016 5:25 PM

Back when I was a kid, you could pretty well build everything the neighbors drove.  4 door, 2 door, convertible, hardtop, stationwagon.

John Harvey
  • Member since
    January, 2010
Posted by edseldave on Wednesday, December 14, 2016 1:31 AM

I think some of the 'cost' issue is BS .  Greenlight has announed they will be making a Pontiac Aztek !  Granted it will be in 1:43 scale , but in my opinion why waste tooling money on a car nobody wants & is regularily voted as one of GMs worst designs of modern times ...   Just because it was in a popular TV show doesnt mean it will sell in great numbers .  & what other purpose could they market this ugly car in ???  

I would much rather they make a stock version of the 80's Ford Country Squire that they have in the 'Vacation' movie series ...   Many people Ive talked too agree with me on that subject ..   A 1/25 Country Squire kit would be great too !!

  • Member since
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  • From: nottingham,england
Posted by arcturus on Thursday, December 15, 2016 1:29 AM

As far as kit manufacturers go today, every subject created must have the potential to easily be transformed into a number of other kits.

Look what Moebius did with the '53 Hudson.

It went from a stock Hudson to a racing version, to a '52, to a convertible & then to a '54.

"You have to maximize your tooling in order to stay in business.

What would you get from a '74 Chevy 4 door?

A stock version & a police car, that's about it."

 

What can you do with a 78 Monte Carlo? Stock?? Lowrider????...In fact Trumpeter never did anything with it except stock. They still tooled a brand new kit from it.

But as you pointed out with the Hudson. They made a stock car version of it, chopped the roof off, made a convertible, changed the grill, made the next year up.

So why not with a car like a 74 chevy 4 door, have a police version, taxi, even a lowrider (4 doors are used aren't they?) and then utilise the mold, change the roof line (Like revel did with the 57 ford to make the wagon) and have a 2 door Impala and convertible? 

 

Because unlike some Robin hoods,I can speak with an english accent...
  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Thursday, December 15, 2016 12:31 PM

arcturus

As far as kit manufacturers go today, every subject created must have the potential to easily be transformed into a number of other kits.

Look what Moebius did with the '53 Hudson.

It went from a stock Hudson to a racing version, to a '52, to a convertible & then to a '54.

"You have to maximize your tooling in order to stay in business.

What would you get from a '74 Chevy 4 door?

A stock version & a police car, that's about it."

 

What can you do with a 78 Monte Carlo? Stock?? Lowrider????...In fact Trumpeter never did anything with it except stock. They still tooled a brand new kit from it.

But as you pointed out with the Hudson. They made a stock car version of it, chopped the roof off, made a convertible, changed the grill, made the next year up.

So why not with a car like a 74 chevy 4 door, have a police version, taxi, even a lowrider (4 doors are used aren't they?) and then utilise the mold, change the roof line (Like revel did with the 57 ford to make the wagon) and have a 2 door Impala and convertible? 

 

 

First of all, Trumpeter is not an American kit manufacturer & I don't think that too many parallels can be made between the two.

I have no idea how well Trumpeter did with the '78 Monte Carlo, but my instinct tells me not very well.

Trumpeter does almost exclusively military models & their occasional forray into the model car market can be "financed" by their military sales.

Plus, you have to take into consideration the cost of those kits.

If Revell did a '74 Chevy 4 door kit & charged $50.00 for them, do you really think anyone would buy them?

As far as the taxi & police versions of a '74 Chevy kit is concerned, those are variations that could be contained in one kit with a few extra parts & decals.

No alterations to the original molds would be required.

In my opinion, few people are going to buy the original kit & then pay another $30.00 for extra decals & a light bar, which is what the manufacturer needs to happen to make the molds profitable.

As far as going to a wagon, or a 2 door or convertible, that would require major mold modifications which would defeat the purpose of maximizing the sales on a particular mold.

The wagon may be feasible requiring only a different body, interior & rear end treatment, but a hardtop or convertible would require virtually an all new set of molds.

It would need a body, interior, glass, changes to the chassis, etc.

Basically, the only things saved from the original kit would be the engine, some chassis parts and most of the chrome parts.

 

Steve

  • Member since
    February, 2004
  • From: nottingham,england
Posted by arcturus on Thursday, December 15, 2016 1:27 PM

"As far as the taxi & police versions of a '74 Chevy kit is concerned, those are variations that could be contained in one kit with a few extra parts & decals.

No alterations to the original molds would be required "

Didn't revell Make a seperate police, taxi, and firechief, version of their Caprice?....not to mention a slightly modified version of in the form of the SS Impala?

Because unlike some Robin hoods,I can speak with an english accent...
  • Member since
    February, 2004
  • From: nottingham,england
Posted by arcturus on Thursday, December 15, 2016 1:30 PM

I get a feeling the Montecarlo didn't do to well either. Maybe because of the inaccurate engine and undersized wheels, which were difficult to replace....or maybe because it was cheaper to buy an MPC version.
Having said that, the Revell seems to of done ok with their 77 montecarlo lowrider. That was a totally new mold of a car you can't do much with.

Because unlike some Robin hoods,I can speak with an english accent...
  • Member since
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Posted by CanesBart on Thursday, December 15, 2016 3:24 PM

Kits that would sell big time:  '74 Monaco 4 dr, '73 Delta 88 4 dr, 74-78 Firebirds NOT T/Aa, 70's Caddilacs and Continentals (I want to make a proper pimpmobile when they were cool Lincolns or El Dorados, and not 90's Monte Carlos with 24" rims)

A "Ash Delta 88" kit would sell, I'm certain.

 

Look at the prices of the few 4 dr kits, like the Johans and such.  They aint 80+ bucks because nobody wants them?

  • Member since
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Posted by Goofy62 on Thursday, December 15, 2016 5:57 PM



Didn't revell Make a seperate police, taxi, and firechief, version of their Caprice?....not to mention a slightly modified version of in the form of the SS Impala?

 

Yes but do you have any facts on how well the kit actually sold?

Could very well have been an attempt to recoup some revenue on a big turkey.

My guess is that the Caprice kit was geared mainly towards the Police & Fire crowd, which you have to admit, is a limited demographic, so your guess is as good as mine as to why they took the chance.

Just because a company did a kit Doesn't mean it was a success.

I'm sure the model kit highway is littered with failures.

 

Steve

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Thursday, December 15, 2016 6:09 PM

CanesBart

Kits that would sell big time:  '74 Monaco 4 dr, '73 Delta 88 4 dr, 74-78 Firebirds NOT T/Aa, 70's Caddilacs and Continentals (I want to make a proper pimpmobile when they were cool Lincolns or El Dorados, and not 90's Monte Carlos with 24" rims)

A "Ash Delta 88" kit would sell, I'm certain.

 

Look at the prices of the few 4 dr kits, like the Johans and such.  They aint 80+ bucks because nobody wants them?

 

That is purely opinion that any of those would sell based on your wants.

The guys who have to fork over a couple hundred thousand bucks for kit developement may have a differing opinion.

Unfortunately, in this case, it's their opinion which will rule the day.

The fact that old Johan 4 door kits sell for big dollars has absolutely nothing to do with the popularity of 4 door vehicles.

That is all about rareity.

The 2 door Johan kits from the same era sell for just as much or more than the 4 door kits.

The 4 door kits that do sell for huge amounts, like the '60-'62 Cadillacs, & '61/'62 Oldsmobiles Only go for those prices based on how rare they are.

Why are they so rare?

because they didn't sell well in the early 60s either.

Why do you think that Johan, along with all of the other manufacturers, went to all 2 door kits in '63?

 

Steve

  • Member since
    October, 2016
Posted by CanesBart on Friday, December 16, 2016 2:06 PM

Well of course its my opinion, Steve  Wink

And yes, your point is valid about the old Johan kits.  Mostly threw that out there because I am upset that I cant find a dang '74-78 Firebird or Caddilac kit/promo for less than the original sticker price of the prototype 1:1 car! Super Angry

But my opinion that a '74 Monaco and '73 Delta '88 would sell, I stand by.  Heck, IMO, the reason the '78 Monaco still sells enough to stay in current production is for want of a '74.  

 

BTW, is there a "Resin Registry", a reference which lists all or many of the resin bodies available by the multitude of resin makers?

 

I thought injection molding was a lot cheaper nowadays?  I remember even some garage companies coming out with nice injection molded 1/35 armor stuff (mostly from Russia, for some reason)

 

Maybe 3d Printers will hit auto modeling?

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Friday, December 16, 2016 6:18 PM

CanesBart

Well of course its my opinion, Steve  Wink

And yes, your point is valid about the old Johan kits.  Mostly threw that out there because I am upset that I cant find a dang '74-78 Firebird or Caddilac kit/promo for less than the original sticker price of the prototype 1:1 car! Super Angry

But my opinion that a '74 Monaco and '73 Delta '88 would sell, I stand by.  Heck, IMO, the reason the '78 Monaco still sells enough to stay in current production is for want of a '74.  

 

BTW, is there a "Resin Registry", a reference which lists all or many of the resin bodies available by the multitude of resin makers?

 

I thought injection molding was a lot cheaper nowadays?  I remember even some garage companies coming out with nice injection molded 1/35 armor stuff (mostly from Russia, for some reason)

 

Maybe 3d Printers will hit auto modeling?

 

I'd buy a '73 Delta 88 if it was a 2 door! Big Smile

I personally would much rather see a '69-'72 Dodge Polara or Monaco kit, but in a 2 door or convertible version.

The same era of Plymouth Fury would be nice too.

I know that I've seen some pretty comprehensive lists of resin casters as well as decals & other aftermarket parts in my browsing sessions, but I can't seem to remember them right off hand.

I don't know how much the actual cost of injection molding is, but there's a ton of work that needs to be done before the "molding" begins.

Developement & the making of the molds themselves is where the "real" money comes in.

I really think that 3d printing could really play an important role in the future of our hobby.

At some point the old method of developement & manufacturing will become cost prohibitive, especially for a shrinking pool of modelers, & as 3d printing becomes more refined & cheaper, which it will, we may be able to get a kit of nearly anything our hearts desire.

Probably going to be a few years yet, but I really believe it may be coming.

 

Steve

  • Member since
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Posted by trainwreck on Friday, December 16, 2016 6:55 PM

Just piping in here if that's alright!?!, I think I can build a convincing 2 dr. police car but I would be hard pressed to build a good looking 4 dr. "hot rod".( hell even Gapp & Roush couldn't pull it off) Just sayin' ,,,Trainwreck.

  • Member since
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  • From: Springfield, Missouri
Posted by chriscarrollogre on Friday, December 16, 2016 7:32 PM

Re: 3D printing. I've seen someone post elsewhere images of a 1/32 scale 1972-ish AMC Matador 4dr police car that they had 3D printed so that they could make a slot car out of it. There are several very nice 3D models of cop cars, for example (66 Ford Galaxie 4dr; 72 Chevrolet Bel Air 4dr; 72 AMC Matador 4dr; 74 Dodge Monaco 4dr; 76 Plymouth Volare 4dr, etc.) that could concievably be rendered into 3D printed models in any scale you'd like. So, I imagine it could be done.

You'd have to buy the 3D models (expensive!), either know how to do 3D modeling or learn it in order to convert the 3D models into something that could be 3D printed, and then pay for the 3D printing (also expensive!), but you could theoretically do it.

Re: Resin Registry. If anyone wants a copy of a sort of resin registry, I just made one that is slanted toward models that could be made into, or with some work altered into 4dr police cars (cos that's my area of interest). There are an amazingly largish number of resin 4dr models on the market, supposedly. I say supposedly, because my understanding is that even if a resin caster says on their website that they offer a kit you might want, they might not actually have any on hand, so it's always best to email them first to see if what you saw listed is actually available.

But I made a 3-page list of Chevys, Fords and Mopars from current sources. If any of you would like a copy of that list, I'd be happy to send you one. Just let me know.

-- probably the easiest and safest way to contact me if you want a copy of my list is to look for me as Christopher N. Carroll on Facebook, and PM me with your email address. That way, you don't have to plaster your email out in public, like, and I'll send a copy of the list to you.

CCarroll

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Posted by ambman on Saturday, December 17, 2016 11:47 AM

THANK YOU FOR BEING A 4 DOOR FAN TO .FOR SOME REASON MY POSTS ARE MADE FUN OF THESES GUYS WANT ONLY 2 DOORS/BOOORING,, 4 DOORS ARE GREAT FOR POLICE FIRE CABS ETC,,WHEN I GO TO THEN TOY FAIR IN NY I MEET WITH THE MODEL COMPANIES THEY WRITE THINGS DOWN THEN IM SURE THEY TOSS THEM IN THE ROUND FILE,,,,,,,,,,KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK

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Posted by Goofy62 on Saturday, December 17, 2016 1:45 PM

ambman

THANK YOU FOR BEING A 4 DOOR FAN TO .FOR SOME REASON MY POSTS ARE MADE FUN OF THESES GUYS WANT ONLY 2 DOORS/BOOORING,, 4 DOORS ARE GREAT FOR POLICE FIRE CABS ETC,,WHEN I GO TO THEN TOY FAIR IN NY I MEET WITH THE MODEL COMPANIES THEY WRITE THINGS DOWN THEN IM SURE THEY TOSS THEM IN THE ROUND FILE,,,,,,,,,,KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK

 

That's the problem.

Police fire & cabs are all they're good for.

The vast majority of builders today are building customs, rods, & racing subjects.

Nobody is going to build a '74 Dodge 4 door gasser or oval track car.

I build almost exclusively factory stock models, & while there may be some potential in that arena for a 4 door, there is still not enough interest in 4 door vehicles to justify the dollars involved.

There's by far not enough builders of the subjects you mention to justify a kit manufacturer sinking gobs of money into the project, & this thread is not about whether or not "some" people want or like them, it's about whether or not the kit companies will make them.

They will only make them if there is money to be made.

By the way, I think if you took a poll of model car builders in the country, a large majority would most likely find the 4 door cars "boring". Smile

 

Steve

 

  • Member since
    August, 2016
Posted by mini man on Saturday, December 17, 2016 3:53 PM

Goofy62

 

 
ambman

THANK YOU FOR BEING A 4 DOOR FAN TO .FOR SOME REASON MY POSTS ARE MADE FUN OF THESES GUYS WANT ONLY 2 DOORS/BOOORING,, 4 DOORS ARE GREAT FOR POLICE FIRE CABS ETC,,WHEN I GO TO THEN TOY FAIR IN NY I MEET WITH THE MODEL COMPANIES THEY WRITE THINGS DOWN THEN IM SURE THEY TOSS THEM IN THE ROUND FILE,,,,,,,,,,KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK

 

 

Nobody is going to build a '74 Dodge

 

Steve

 

 

I  hear a challenge there! Cool

Will build most anything,love American cars muscle etc.Britishvehicles are a buzz too,trucks are great - want to do a jet truck,building parts up...

Nigel.

 

U.K.

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Saturday, December 17, 2016 4:33 PM

 

 

 

Nobody is going to build a '74 Dodge

Steve

 

I  hear a challenge there! Cool

 

You mis-quoted me.

I didn't say that nobody is going to build a '74 Dodge, I said "nobody is going to build a '74 Dodge 4 door gasser or oval track car". Wink

 

Steve

  • Member since
    December, 2016
  • From: Springfield, Missouri
Posted by chriscarrollogre on Saturday, December 17, 2016 4:40 PM

Goofy62, I kinda agree that four-doors have a limited appeal. That's one reason I'd most likely not go through the hassle of making resin kits for sale, mastered from any 4dr sedans I may make. 

On the other hand, there are more than just a few dedicated groups, incl. police car collectors, and even demolition-derby modelers, who might go for a couple of 4drs if you were to make them.

It is surprising how many resin casters have made 4dr models, and how many are still listed as available on their websites. There has to be some sort of market out there for them to still say they'll sell you one.

In any case, I don't think a muscle car scene is complete without a police car lurking in the background. You can have all the muscle cars, pony cars, racers, ricers, and whatnot that you like - but you'll never have the thrill of a good old-fashioned car chase without a car to do the chasing with! So, I think at least one 4dr cop car deserves to be in anybody's collection, even if it is a diecast.

 

CCarroll

  • Member since
    August, 2015
Posted by htown2 on Saturday, December 17, 2016 6:07 PM

Lot of parallels between the 1:1 collector car and hotrod hobby and what's available in the model car world.  First off the demographics are pretty similar, mostly baby boomers.  (look at the audience during any Mecum auction and also look at the number of posters on here who say they started modeling in the sixties as kids). I know there are some younger people in both groups but a relatively small number.  Second the main driver for both 1:1 and model building seems to be nostalgia, either for the cars they actually owned back in the day or dreamed of owning.

So the question is who is nostalgic for a 74 Dodge 4 door?  Who has fond memories of driving one in high school or really wished they had.  Who wishes they would have never got rid of their 74 Dodge.  How many do you see at cruise nights.  How many bids would one get at a Mecum auction.

Now compare that with say a Hemi-cuda.

It's either the memory or the fantasy that most of us want to build when we buy a kit. Something we would like to own and drive in real life.

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