SEARCH SCALEAUTOMAG.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

August article on lacquer painting: Very good, but...

1142 views
9 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    November 2003
August article on lacquer painting: Very good, but...
Posted by mustangmuscle on Thursday, July 8, 2004 4:28 PM
I am a car modeler, not a professional paint jobber, and the one and only time I went to a paint shop to ask for advice, the guy did not cooperate a lot to help me find the products I wanted. and if he had a good primer, it came in gallons at a steep price, and I was not even sure it was the right product. I see you recommend the Dupont products, but they are not available everywhere, it seems PPG products are more available, but then I do not know which products to use.

I tried to look for online sources for automotive products, but I could not locate a single dealer, so I am stuck with paint shops, which I hate becaus everything is behind the counter, and if the guy is not cooperative...

In the end, it would be nice to have a source similar to MCW that distribute the Dupont Variprime and such in small quantities.

I guess I will stick to Testors enamels, Testors new lacquers and Tamiya lacquers for now. This is too bad, I would really like to experiment with lacquers, but it still seems too intimidating despite your good article. Perhaps I will give a try to MCW products soon, with their sealer (but I do not know if this is a good sealer, stopping ghost images from appearing....has anyone used it?)

A side question regarding this article, you mention the air pressure needed to shoot lacquer paint is above 35PSI, but then all modeling-grade compressors do not go beyond 30PSI, so once again I am stuck with my nice and silent Iwata compressor?!? Is there a way to airbrush lacquers at a lower pressure?

Oh, by the way, I agree with everyone else, the august issue is a very good one, lots of articles (not enough to keep me busy for two months, but...), presentaion is improving a lot, even the paper seems of a higher quality and whiter. Keep up the good job!

Thanks!

  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 6, 2004 6:26 PM
Try using Dupli-Color's Primer-sealer, you can get it at Wal-Mart! I've used it under nail polish, actual automotive lacquers, and Dupli-Color "Mirage" color shifting paint with great results. Lay down two coats, let it set for a few days, and you'll be ready to go. Just be sure not to load the color coats on too heavy or it'll be stripping time.
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 6, 2004 9:44 PM
Much of the content on my Cobra Colors website is directed at resolving the problems you've been encountering. You're welcome to click on the link below my signature, have a look around, and contact me via e-mail with any questions or comments you have. I'm always happy to help!
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by dubix88 on Saturday, August 7, 2004 7:26 AM
HEY,
I have been using plasti-cote. I got it from my stepdad from when he use to do rc boats and trucks, and he gets all his stuff at wal-mart.lol It works good and wont react with testors enamel or anything like that. I have also used dupli-color and it works great.

Randy
"If a woman has to choose between saving an infants life and catching a fly ball, she would choose to save the infant without even considering if there is a man on base." -Dave Barry Semper Fidelis
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, August 8, 2004 12:17 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by mustangmuscle

I am a car modeler, not a professional paint jobber, and the one and only time I went to a paint shop to ask for advice, the guy did not cooperate a lot to help me find the products I wanted. and if he had a good primer, it came in gallons at a steep price, and I was not even sure it was the right product. I see you recommend the Dupont products, but they are not available everywhere, it seems PPG products are more available, but then I do not know which products to use.

I tried to look for online sources for automotive products, but I could not locate a single dealer, so I am stuck with paint shops, which I hate becaus everything is behind the counter, and if the guy is not cooperative...

In the end, it would be nice to have a source similar to MCW that distribute the Dupont Variprime and such in small quantities.

I guess I will stick to Testors enamels, Testors new lacquers and Tamiya lacquers for now. This is too bad, I would really like to experiment with lacquers, but it still seems too intimidating despite your good article. Perhaps I will give a try to MCW products soon, with their sealer (but I do not know if this is a good sealer, stopping ghost images from appearing....has anyone used it?)

A side question regarding this article, you mention the air pressure needed to shoot lacquer paint is above 35PSI, but then all modeling-grade compressors do not go beyond 30PSI, so once again I am stuck with my nice and silent Iwata compressor?!? Is there a way to airbrush lacquers at a lower pressure?

Oh, by the way, I agree with everyone else, the august issue is a very good one, lots of articles (not enough to keep me busy for two months, but...), presentaion is improving a lot, even the paper seems of a higher quality and whiter. Keep up the good job!

Thanks!




For starters, I do understand your difficulty with the autobody paint dealer you tried to query--those guys generally have little clue as to how to advise a modeler, simply because they aren't in that business.

I've always had very good results with Acrylic Lacquer sandable primer-surfacers, through my airbrush. I used Sherwin-Williams & Martin Senour for years, but they no longer produce acrylic lacquers in spray cans (perfect for shooting through an airbrush), so I now use Plasticote, which is still acrylic lacquer.

PPG-Ditzler still makes acrylic lacquers in a wide variety of colors, but you do have to buy it in at least a pint can. MCW is mostly either DuPont or PPG-Ditzler, as I understand it, and you can use MCW's products will confidence, the stuff works, and works well.

I strongly recommend, however, that you use an airbrush.

Biscuitbuilder
  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: CA Gold Country foothills.
Posted by mishalah on Sunday, August 8, 2004 3:54 AM
The Dupli-Color and Plasti-Kote primers and paints are excellent. They come in real life colors as well as custom paints like the 3 part color shifting metallics. The primers will barrier against almost anything, but as with all plastic applications should be tested on scrap parts just in case.

If your local paint shop doesn't know what to say or do about model applications don't be surprised. A good supplier should be able to put any color into a spray can if you want, but it is much more expensive than regular rattle cans. Just ask that any color you choose be mixed so its not too HOT. They can control that.

Good luck.Smile

"Help me....I've fallen and I can't get up."...my models are crushing me. my pics: https://public.fotki.com/dallas916/

  • Member since
    February 2004
  • From: cen. Cal. coast
Posted by lacquerjack on Monday, August 9, 2004 2:32 AM
25-30 pounds will work if you add some extra thinner. Most of the current lacquers recommend a 1 to 1 combination; try going 1 to 1 1/4th (thinner) or up to 1 1/2 at the most. It will take more coats to cover and will require a bit of practice to get them smooth rather than dry (rough). They will flash dry much faster than the thicker mixture which is good; less chance of it attacking the plastic or filler. I'm not positive, but I think Veriprime is available by the quart. It's actual function is as a rust inhibiting, etching primer used over bare metal, then lacquer primer/surfacer is used over it. However, if M.G.'s way works for him, it should work for the rest of us. Can't wait to try it myself.
  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Denver
Posted by dag65 on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 5:14 PM
I have great luck with Duplicolor primers and House of Kolors Paints. Guess i got lucky that the guys at Allen Paint here in Denver like to talk and give advice.
Did you uy anything whilre you were there? That usually helps vs. going in and just stroking them for info.
I want to be a race car passenger: just a guy who bugs the driver. "Say man, can I turn on the radio? You should slow down. Why do we gotta keep going in circles? Can I put my feet out the window? Man, you really like Tide..." http://public.fotki.com/BigPoppa/darins_stuff-1/
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 13, 2004 12:54 PM
My local paint shop gave me a quote of $35.00 to mix up a pint of PPG '72 Olds Sequoia Green and put it in a spray can, with each additional can costing $7.50. To me, that's a lot of money for a model paint job! The guy told me he could include the gloss in the mixture so that I didn't have to do a base coat/clear coat application. I didn't know that he could control how "hot" the paint was though.

Jim
  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: N.E. of Indy-a-no-place, where cool was born
Posted by modelbuildngrandpa on Friday, August 13, 2004 2:35 PM
HEY JAABAT!!! Buy a small 1 or 2 HP air compressor, i see them at yard sales (or Sears) and than get a small "touch up" paint gun. They are cheap at Wally World or Farm and Fleet type stores. This set up will let you buy in part pints at your paint jobber and will be much easyer to deal with than an airbrush.(less fragle)
Wheres my #$%^@# bailout??

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

FREE MONTHLY NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our privacy policy