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Headlight lenses

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  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Headlight lenses
Posted by Bainford on Thursday, August 10, 2017 7:55 AM

Does anyone know of an aftermarket source for quality headlight lenses?

Thanks

Power matters in the straights.
Lightness matters everywhere. - Colin Chapman

Trevor

  • Member since
    May, 2017
  • From: Douglas AZ>
Posted by littletimmy on Thursday, August 10, 2017 8:49 PM

 Back when I was still building model railroad stuff I discovered MV Products or it may be MV Lenses not sure which. But they have multiple sizes and colors so you can do headlights , taillights ,turnsignals and reverse lights. 

I have a pile of them in my spare parts box that I cant get to at the moment so give me a day or two and I'll come up with the correct name.

Dont worry about the thumb print.... paint it rust and call it battle damage

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Friday, August 11, 2017 9:18 AM

Thanks for the info, Timmy. I am familiar with MV Lenses. They do a pretty good job of replicating a headlight, but I am looking for a clear lens with an accurate lens pattern for scratchbuilt headlight assemblies. I thought someone out there might be casting copies of particularly good kit lenses, but so far I have found nothing. I may just have to make my own.

Power matters in the straights.
Lightness matters everywhere. - Colin Chapman

Trevor

  • Member since
    October, 2008
Posted by oldcarguy on Sunday, August 13, 2017 8:50 AM

YES !

 Yourself ! Save your money . Take a NEW bottle of styrene cement . Put about half in another clean bottle . Prefferably one with the brush removed . Now take as many models as you have in progress . Clip apart All the untinted clear sprue and insert in bottle . Wait four or five days and stir the new mixture gently . Add a few more drops of glue if it is stiff .

  Now take your oldest X - Acto #1 handle and round and polish the end to resemble a headlight .Now Etch the lines in there and polish it to a shine .Put a small blob of the Sprue Glue clear on it .Wait overnight and the next day pop it off , trim and install in headlight bezel .

  There's no need to spend hard earned bucks when you have the materials right at hand . If you build these things called models , you must have some patience , right ? Well , let it pay off for you .

gjgeracci
  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Sunday, August 13, 2017 1:52 PM

I've been using "mold putty" to make a mold of a particular lens & then cast them in "Laser Bond" glue.

Works pretty well for me.

 

Steve

 

DSCN6016DSCN5967

 

  • Member since
    October, 2008
Posted by oldcarguy on Sunday, August 13, 2017 2:05 PM

Now ;

 See there ? I never even thought about the Lazer Bond Glue . Good going there .

gjgeracci
  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Monday, August 14, 2017 10:53 AM

Thanks for the tips, guys. The Laser Bond product sounds like a viable solution. I figured that I would eventually have to scratch some lenses, but thought it would be worth checking if good accurate items were available. It seems not, though given the number of old kits available with chrome headlights, and the number of builders who strive for a more accurate option, I am somewhat surprised.

Time to start digging through the stash and look for nice accurate examples to copy. Just curious Steve, what are you using for 'mold putty'?

Power matters in the straights.
Lightness matters everywhere. - Colin Chapman

Trevor

  • Member since
    October, 2008
Posted by oldcarguy on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 12:10 PM

Hi

 Just need to comment . The Sprue Glue is not strong enough to harm molded headlights that are of the older chromed type . Good molds there .

gjgeracci
  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 1:23 PM

Power matters in the straights.
Lightness matters everywhere. - Colin Chapman

Trevor

  • Member since
    July, 2008
Posted by Foxer on Wednesday, August 23, 2017 12:40 PM

Laserbond, or, Bondic which I use, is the way to go as far as I'm concerned. I use it for a lot of small things I cast. With some silicone casting putty it only takes a few seconds to cast and cure.

Headlights DSC 1634

Headlights DSC 1635

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Wednesday, August 30, 2017 8:49 PM

Those results look very good. I wasn't familiar with silicone casting putty, so I just googled it up. Not sure how i missed this stuff, but it seems very useful stuff. This must be the same stuff Steve referred to above. And I have some Bondic that I haven't tried yet. Time to start ripping through kits in search of headlight masters.

Power matters in the straights.
Lightness matters everywhere. - Colin Chapman

Trevor

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by 195X on Wednesday, August 30, 2017 9:50 PM

Foxer

Laserbond, or, Bondic which I use, is the way to go as far as I'm concerned. I use it for a lot of small things I cast. With some silicone casting putty it only takes a few seconds to cast and cure.

Headlights DSC 1634

Headlights DSC 1635

 

That's pretty impressive. I am always dubious about the "As seen on TV" products and had wondered about the possible uses of the Lazer bond. Now I can't find it! lol. Definitely gonna scare some up now. Any chance one of you guys will do a quick tutorial?

Additional: I wonder if this is similar to the material the lazer 3d printers use?

My favorite color is clear. I am also ambidexterous, I can screw up equally well with either hand. I am 53 years old and been building for most of that time. :)

On the bench... somewhere. Pink Panther show car, 1978 Dodge Magnum Charger Daytona Midnight edition SE 300. Mongrel T.

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Thursday, August 31, 2017 10:31 AM

195X

 

 
Foxer

Laserbond, or, Bondic which I use, is the way to go as far as I'm concerned. I use it for a lot of small things I cast. With some silicone casting putty it only takes a few seconds to cast and cure.

Headlights DSC 1634

Headlights DSC 1635

 

 

 

That's pretty impressive. I am always dubious about the "As seen on TV" products and had wondered about the possible uses of the Lazer bond. Now I can't find it! lol. Definitely gonna scare some up now. Any chance one of you guys will do a quick tutorial?

 

Additional: I wonder if this is similar to the material the lazer 3d printers use?

 

Really no need for a tutorial.

It's pretty straight forward.

I use Alumilite 2 part mold putty for the molds.

mix some up according to instructions, make an impression in the putty of the head light that you want to replicate & let the mold cure.

When it's cured, remove the original lens, squeeze a little Laser Bond into the mold & zap it with UV light & the replica is complete.

I do like to use a lens with the detail engraving on the back side for making the mold.

The Laser Bond can be "heaped" up in the mold to give you a slightly crowned surface.

Doing it this way will give you a smooth shiny surface to the lens like a real head light.

If you use a lens with the engraving on the front, the duplicate will have a dull appearance.

 

Steve

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by 195X on Thursday, August 31, 2017 12:02 PM

Thank you Steve. I'm going to have to give it a try now. You're right, it's pretty straight forward. I'm going to have to test and see how it does on tail lights as well. Thanks for the tip. :)

My favorite color is clear. I am also ambidexterous, I can screw up equally well with either hand. I am 53 years old and been building for most of that time. :)

On the bench... somewhere. Pink Panther show car, 1978 Dodge Magnum Charger Daytona Midnight edition SE 300. Mongrel T.

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Thursday, August 31, 2017 1:35 PM

195X

Thank you Steve. I'm going to have to give it a try now. You're right, it's pretty straight forward. I'm going to have to test and see how it does on tail lights as well. Thanks for the tip. :)

 

Can't see any reason why it wouldn't work on tail lights as well.

You could either mold them clear & paint with clear red after, or you might be able to mix a little red dye or the like with the Laser Bond.

 

Steve

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by 195X on Thursday, August 31, 2017 1:39 PM

Yeah, I phrased that poorly. I'm sure it will work. I was thinking along the lines of tail lights that have a clear or "white" portion to them. Not sure adding a dye would help, but I suspect it may hinder the curing of the glue.

My favorite color is clear. I am also ambidexterous, I can screw up equally well with either hand. I am 53 years old and been building for most of that time. :)

On the bench... somewhere. Pink Panther show car, 1978 Dodge Magnum Charger Daytona Midnight edition SE 300. Mongrel T.

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Thursday, August 31, 2017 2:15 PM

Thanks for the detailed explanation, Steve. I agree with chosing lenses with the detail on the back side. And the idea of tinting the glue material red for a tail light is intriguing, too.

Power matters in the straights.
Lightness matters everywhere. - Colin Chapman

Trevor

  • Member since
    October, 2008
Posted by oldcarguy on Friday, September 29, 2017 2:38 PM

See !

 Now the clear portion is the back - up light lens .You did not necessarily get that option on the cheaper cars . Use the original and then do this .Put a piece of paper between the red and white Section .  This is after you've made a master mold of sculpey .

 Pour in a little clear . Oh  ! Make sure the paper is waxed paper . Let the Clear set up and then pour in the Red . Note .If you want the pattern and the pattern is on the outside Just over coat with a little more thinly , after set-up  .   O.C.G.

gjgeracci

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