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johnesposito

  • Member since May 2019
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About johnesposito

It is extremely important that sentences are coherent, with words and thoughts connected in proper relationships to avoid misunderstanding on the part of the reader.   Always proofread your writing to ensure pay someone to do my homework that the meaning of each sentence is clear, based on these guidelines: 

Placement of Sentence Parts:  Make sure that words are placed with the unit of thought to which they are related.   Misplacing even one word can change the meaning of a sentence, as demonstrated in the following examples: 

1.Only I study in the afternoon.   (I alone study in the afternoon.) 

2.I only study in the afternoon.   (I never do anything else in the afternoon.) 

3.I study only in the afternoon.   (I never study any other time.) 

Parallel Construction:  Ideas of equal value in a sentence should be expressed in the same form to help the reader recognize the similarity of the ideas.   Study these examples of “wrong” and “corrected” parallel construction: 

1.(Wrong)  When I study in the afternoon, I read my textbook, write my essays and to improve my spelling.   (Corrected)  When I study in the afternoon, I read my textbook, write my essays and improve my spelling. 

2.(Wrong)  The three objectives of studying in the afternoon are:  (1) to complete assignments quickly, (2) learning to spell and (3) making a good grade.   (Corrected)  The three objectives of studying in the afternoon are:  (1) completing assignments quickly, (2) learning to spell and (3) making a good grade. 

Complete Comparison:  When making comparisons in your sentences, supply all the words needed to complete the comparative thought. 

1.(Wrong)  I study faster.   (Corrected)  I study faster than my best friend. 

2.(Wrong)  I have been studying longer.   (Corrected)  I have been studying longer than anyone else in my class. 

Pronoun Reference:  (This is my worst editing nightmare.)  The word to which a pronoun refers must be clear to the reader.   It, he, she, they, you and this take the place of nouns (person, places or things), and must agree with the nouns to which they refer so that a consistent viewpoint is maintained.   If your reader has to re-read the sentence to determine the noun to which the pronoun refers, then your sentence is faulty. 

1.(Wrong)  After studying with my best friend, she thought we would get a good grade.   (Corrected)  After studying with me, my best friend thought we would get a good grade. 

2.(Wrong)  A student who completes assignments quickly will turn in their work on time.   (Corrected)  Students who complete assignments quickly will turn in their work on time. 

The English language is one of the most difficult languages in the world; there are rules, and then there are exceptions to those rules.   At editavenue.com, however, we pride ourselves on our expertise and ability to help you make your writing the best it can be.

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